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  • astralis
    replied
    looks like "warishell" likes the soft power of manga...it sure turned his brain soft.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Power by definition is a force. Thought is not a force. Policy is force. Dumbass.

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  • WarisHell
    replied
    Its What the Media Does With It

    Especially in the US, which has the hard power.

    Soft power is what outsiders think of a country.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by WarisHell View Post
    Soft power as in cute Pandas, information "products" ie tokens that other people like and want and that give nation states influence through popular culture.

    Example of nation state with little military power but huge soft power: Tibet - it has mountains and monks and those little flags, and you know who.

    Example of an east asian state with mega soft power (ATM at least): Japan, it has manga, Fuji, sushi, Pacific Island Buddhas, big city lights, Zen gardens, beer drinking cows, pagodas, tenpura, kimonos, samurai, ninjas, world famous beers, sake, etc etc - Heck, even their school uniforms exert soft power.

    People want to go there and be part of it, a la the huge wave following wabi sabi filled Lost in Translation - Relevantly including huge numbers of Han, Song and Koreans.

    Thats soft power.
    In case you haven't noticed, the Dali Lama is living in exile with no influence in his homeland and Japan has lost the economic leadership role.

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  • WarisHell
    replied
    The Other Soft Power

    Soft power as in cute Pandas, information "products" ie tokens that other people like and want and that give nation states influence through popular culture.

    Example of nation state with little military power but huge soft power: Tibet - it has mountains and monks and those little flags, and you know who.

    Example of an east asian state with mega soft power (ATM at least): Japan, it has manga, Fuji, sushi, Pacific Island Buddhas, big city lights, Zen gardens, beer drinking cows, pagodas, tenpura, kimonos, samurai, ninjas, world famous beers, sake, etc etc - Heck, even their school uniforms exert soft power.

    People want to go there and be part of it, a la the huge wave following wabi sabi filled Lost in Translation - Relevantly including huge numbers of Han, Song and Koreans.

    Thats soft power.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    What? Soft power is directly proportional to military strength.

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  • WarisHell
    replied
    Its About Soft Power

    Until PRC gets a decent amount of soft power, it has to consider using force as an operational option.

    It doesnt have many choices.

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  • Deltacamelately
    replied
    Cactus,

    I was reffering to Col Dennis Blasko's assessment that the PLA is willing to consider war as an operational objective.

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  • Cactus
    replied
    Originally posted by Deltacamelately View Post
    It is about the Colonel's assessment, that while we see that the PLA is eyeing asymetric/asynchronous warfare as a factor of detterance, they don't have any qualms in considering detterance as an OPOBJ.
    Sorry, Major, I don't quite understand you here. Can you re-word?

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  • Deltacamelately
    replied
    Originally posted by Cactus View Post
    DCL, why is it so? In other words, why are you still looking at future conflicts and expecting conventional war, when it is constantly being proved that the nature of present and future conflicts will be broader spectrum warfare? Strategic deterrence still has a role at the highest-end of the spectrum (obviously), and the lowest-end as well (ex. bio-terrorism). It is a different matter whether the countries of the sub-continent understand it and prepare for it, or not.
    Cactus,
    Have you already watched both the videos?
    You are missing the point, its not about how and why we are looking at future conflicts in the conventional sense. Our military mind is closer to the west and we have already considered detterance as a byproduct and even in the immediate future will continue pursuing detterance as part of a robust offence-defence construct. It is about the Colonel's assessment, that while we see that the PLA is eyeing asymetric/asynchronous warfare as a factor of detterance, they don't have any qualms in considering detterance as an OPOBJ. This is very very strange if not erronous. This means that they have considered this in a far more complex and wider perspective and want the US to consider this in their scheme of things.

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  • snowhole
    replied
    No problem. :)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Just ordered it. My much appreciated thanks.

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  • snowhole
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    They sent their Officer Training Manual, THE SCIENCE OF MILITARY TECHNOLOGY
    Sir,

    Col Dennis Blasko mentioned the Science of Military Strategy in the great lecture you posted in the China Reading List.

    CJO - Abstract - <em>The Science of Military Strategy</em>. EDITED BY PENG GUANGQIAN AND YAO YOUZHI. Beijing: Military Science Publishing House, 2005. 504 pp. $40.00; RMB 52.00. ISBN 7-80137-892-X.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Cactus View Post
    DCL, why is it so? In other words, why are you still looking at future conflicts and expecting conventional war, when it is constantly being proved that the nature of present and future conflicts will be broader spectrum warfare? Strategic deterrence still has a role at the highest-end of the spectrum (obviously), and the lowest-end as well (ex. bio-terrorism). It is a different matter whether the countries of the sub-continent understand it and prepare for it, or not.
    It's a strange thing about Chinese practice of deterrence. They sent their Officer Training Manual, THE SCIENCE OF MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, translated into English, 200 copies to the US CNO to be distributed as the USN sees fit ... but they did not send any to Taiwan, India, Vietnam, etc.

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  • Cactus
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    I would never have thought to goto battle to achieve deterrence.
    Establishing credibility is the first step towards achieving deterrence. In the Cold War it was a step generally not needed between the two superpowers and their direct allies because of their immediate history. The Chinese did not have that, so they bought it the hard way with blood in Korea, Tibet and Vietnam. There are a whole host of nations battling in Afghanistan now to achieve the same.

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