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2023 Israeli-Gazan War

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  • Neither is a signatory to the ICJ.
    Chimo

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    • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post

      That was my recollection as well...I guess the Gators divested? I have seen the Army Boat People play with them in the Chesapeake off Fort Story in the past.
      No longer necessary after the LCAC and the LPD/LSD/LHAs that had well decks that could embark them.

      LCACs allow us to land on 90% of the worlds shoreline. Before that LSTs and LCMs were limited to less than 10%. Needed the causeways to land supplies

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      • Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
        No longer necessary after the LCAC and the LPD/LSD/LHAs that had well decks that could embark them.

        LCACs allow us to land on 90% of the worlds shoreline. Before that LSTs and LCMs were limited to less than 10%. Needed the causeways to land supplies
        But you're taking the M1s and the M777s out of the equation. You're trading combat power for weight. The question is how much of this trade is legitimate?

        Chimo

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        • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
          But you're taking the M1s and the M777s out of the equation. You're trading combat power for weight. The question is how much of this trade is legitimate?
          LCACs are the only thing that can carry a M-1. Don't know about 777s but a LCAC could carry 2 M198s with prime movers

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          • Originally posted by Gun Grape View Post
            LCACs are the only thing that can carry a M-1. Don't know about 777s but a LCAC could carry 2 M198s with prime movers
            I cannot imagine the USMC trading supplies for a M1 while I can see the M198s. The question remains, would the USMC trade the weight for a M1? You've answered the 777 question.

            Chimo

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            • Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
              I cannot imagine the USMC trading supplies for a M1 while I can see the M198s. The question remains, would the USMC trade the weight for a M1? You've answered the 777 question.
              One of the reasons that the Corps got rid of their M-1s.

              I went on a Med Float (Landing Force 6th Fleet) mid 90s. It was the first MEU to bring tanks since the early 80s.

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              • Egyptian soldier killed in Israel border incident

                An Egyptian soldier has been killed in an incident involving Egyptian and Israeli troops in the border area near Rafah.

                The Egyptian and Israeli militaries are investigating what happened.

                Israeli media say there was an exchange of fire, but there are few other details and no reports of Israeli casualties.

                Tensions between Egypt and Israel have heightened since Israeli forces took control of the Gazan side of the Rafah crossing point three weeks ago as part of their offensive against Hamas.

                Egypt is a strong supporter of the Palestinians and has condemned Israel's military campaign in Gaza and the killing of thousands of civilians by Israel in the war.

                Egypt was the first Arab country to sign a peace deal with Israel 45 years ago and, although it has held, relations between the two sides have often been frosty. Deadly incidents between Egyptian and Israeli troops are rare, however.

                Hours before the shooting, Egypt's foreign ministry condemned an Israeli strike on Rafah which killed at least 45 people, according to Gaza's Hamas-run health ministry. It accused Israel of the "targeting of defenceless civilians".

                The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) said the attack had killed two senior Hamas officials and that it was reviewing reports that civilians were harmed as a result of the strike and fire it ignited.

                Like Israel, Egypt has maintained a blockade on its border with Gaza since Hamas came to power in 2006. Hamas is an off-shoot of the Islamist Muslim Brotherhood organisation, which is banned as a terrorist group in Egypt.

                Egypt has, however, kept channels open with Hamas and has been acting as a mediator in on-off indirect talks between Israel and the group to try to reach a ceasefire deal and release of Israeli hostages held by Hamas in Gaza.

                ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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                • Not good...
                  “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                  Mark Twain

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                  • Keep in mind, Nature, like the enemy, always gets a vote. And reminder the Allies built, towed and emplaced artificial harbors to Normandy called Mulberries in 1944. They had months to plan and build accordingly. And even though the Allies sank blockships to form a breakwater one of the piers was destroyed in a storm 2 weeks later. Their time to prepare this was days and weeks, not months. And there was no way to install a breakwater in this instance.


                    https://apnews.com/article/gaza-pier...9b814c36ea3526


                    US-built pier will be removed from Gaza coast and repaired after damage from rough seas

                    The U.S.-built temporary pier that has been taking humanitarian aid to starving Palestinians for less than two weeks will be removed from the coast of Gaza to be repaired after getting damaged in rough seas and weather, the Pentagon said Tuesday.

                    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S.-built temporary pier that has been taking humanitarian aid to starving Palestinians for less than two weeks will be removed from the coast of Gaza to be repaired after getting damaged in rough seas and weather, the Pentagon said Tuesday.

                    Over the next two days, the pier will be pulled from the beach and sent to the southern Israeli city of Ashdod, where U.S. Central Command will repair it, Pentagon spokeswoman Sabrina Singh told reporters. She said the fixes will take “at least over a week” and then the pier will need to be anchored back into the beach in Gaza.

                    “From when it was operational, it was working, and we just had sort of an unfortunate confluence of weather storms that made it inoperable for a bit,” Singh said. “Hopefully just a little over a week, we should be back up and running.”

                    The pier, used to carry in humanitarian aid arriving by sea, is one of the few ways that free food and other supplies are getting to Palestinians who the U.N. says are on the brink of famine amid the nearly 8-month-old war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza.

                    The two main crossings in southern Gaza, Rafah from Egypt and Kerem Shalom from Israel, are either not operating or are largely inaccessible for the U.N. because of fighting nearby as Israel pushes into Rafah. The pier and two crossings from Israel in northern Gaza are where most of the incoming humanitarian aid has entered in the past three weeks.


                    The setback is the latest for the $320 million pier, which only began operations in the past two weeks and has already had three U.S. service members injured and had four vessels beached due to heavy seas. Two of the service members received minor injuries but the third is still in critical condition, Singh said.

                    Deliveries also were halted for two days last week after crowds rushed aid trucks coming from the pier and one Palestinian man was shot dead.


                    The pier was fully functional as late as Saturday when heavy seas unmoored four of the Army boats that were being used to ferry pallets of aid from commercial vessels to the pier. The system is anchored into the beach in Gaza and provided a long causeway for trucks to drive that aid onto the shore.

                    Two of the vessels got stuck on the coast of Israel. One has already been recovered and the other will be in the next 24 hours with the help of the Israeli military, Singh said. The other two boats were stranded on the beach in Gaza and were expected to be recovered in the next two days, she said.

                    The suspension of the pier comes after the new sea route had begun to pick up steam, with more than 1,000 metric tons of food aid delivered.

                    U.S. officials have repeatedly emphasized that the pier cannot provide the amount of aid that starving Gazans need and said that more checkpoints for humanitarian trucks need to be opened. At maximum capacity, the pier would bring in enough food for 500,000 of Gaza’s people, and U.S. officials have stressed the need for open land crossings for the remaining 1.8 million.

                    The U.S. also has planned to continue to provide airdrops of food, which likewise cannot meet all the needs.

                    A deepening Israeli offensive in the southern city of Rafah has made it impossible for aid shipments to get through the crossing there, which is a key source for fuel and food coming into Gaza. Israel says it is bringing aid in through another border crossing, Kerem Shalom, but humanitarian organizations say Israeli military operations make it difficult for them to retrieve the aid there for distribution.
                    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                    Mark Twain

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                    • I was kind of wondering why the DoD didn't go with a more 'permanent' structure rather than a floating dock. Nothing fancy just a few piles with some spans bolted on and a road bed off the beach. Something good enough to hold up for a couple of years at most under steady use. The Isrealis would just blow it up once it wasn't being used by the US anyway so its not like it would become a permanent asset for the Gazans.

                      As I said just wandering out loud since I have zero knowledge of the practicalities, no critism intended.
                      Last edited by Monash; 30 May 24,, 10:08.
                      If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

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                      • https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/cd11z2j34k4o

                        Four Israeli hostages freed in raid in central Gaza


                        Finally some good news!
                        That said, there are already media commentators bemoaning the fact that around 50 Gazans were killed, whien the IDF moved in; under heavy fire, to liberate the hostages in two locations.
                        IMO, I say fuck ‘em!
                        Better them, than having the 4 liberated hostages join the more than the 30-40 hostages that have been reported killed while being held hostage!

                        When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow. - Anais Nin

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                        • Originally posted by Amled View Post
                          https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/cd11z2j34k4o



                          Finally some good news!
                          That said, there are already media commentators bemoaning the fact that around 50 Gazans were killed, whien the IDF moved in; under heavy fire, to liberate the hostages in two locations.
                          IMO, I say fuck ‘em!
                          Better them, than having the 4 liberated hostages join the more than the 30-40 hostages that have been reported killed while being held hostage!
                          Now all they have to do is repeat that process what? Thirty or forty times over to rescue all the remaining hostages (and be as successful every time.) At the rate they're going it should only take the IDF 10 years or so to rescue everyone.
                          Last edited by Monash; 09 Jun 24,, 13:30.
                          If you are emotionally invested in 'believing' something is true you have lost the ability to tell if it is true.

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                          • It’s been said numerous times; both in this thread and elsewhere, that the Gaza War has no good solutions. Only those that are bad, and those that are worse!
                            In the case in point the IDF apparently chose one of the bad ones. They had intelligence on the location of hostages; bird in the hand so to speak, and chose to liberate them! What else could they have done???
                            Let them linger in captivity? Risk the chance that they might be killed? How would they ever justify that to their family and friends? “Yes, we knew their location, but the collateral cost would have been too high?”
                            As said, no good solutions, only bad ones!



                            When we blindly adopt a religion, a political system, a literary dogma, we become automatons. We cease to grow. - Anais Nin

                            Comment



                            • Some, hopefully, good news from Gaza. With the lopsided casualties the Gazans took in the operation to rescue the 4 hostages over the weekend might finally have Netanyahu recognizing it can't go on the way he and the other hardliners want. If he is smart he will also work on the peace deal, treaty and diplomatic recognition from Saudi.

                              Hamas says it accepts UN-backed Gaza truce plan, US cites 'hopeful sign' | Reuters


                              Hamas says it accepts UN-backed Gaza truce plan, US cites 'hopeful sign'

                              By Daphne Psaledakis and Nidal Al-Mughrabi

                              TEL AVIV/CAIRO, June 11 (Reuters) - Hamas accepts a U.N. resolution backing a plan to end the war with Israel in Gaza and is ready to negotiate details, a senior official of the Palestinian militant group said on Tuesday in what the U.S. Secretary of State called a hopeful sign.
                              But Qatari and Egyptian mediators have not received formal replies from Hamas or Israel to the U.N.-backed truce proposal, an official close to the talks told Reuters, and both sides suggested on Tuesday the plan fit their clashing goals, raising doubt whether any genuine headway towards a deal had been made.

                              Discussions also touching on post-war plans for Gaza will continue over the next couple of days, Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in Tel Aviv after talks with Israeli leaders.
                              Blinken met Israeli officials on Tuesday in a push to end the eight-month-old Israeli air and ground war against Hamas that has devastated Gaza, a day after President Joe Biden's proposal for a truce was approved by the U.N. Security Council.

                              Ahead of Blinken's trip, Israel and Hamas both repeated hardline positions that have scuttled previous rounds of truce mediation, while Israel has pressed on with assaults in central and southern Gaza, among the bloodiest of the war.
                              Biden's proposal envisages a ceasefire and phased release of hostages in exchange for Palestinians jailed in Israel, ultimately leading to a permanent end to the war.
                              On Tuesday, senior Hamas official Sami Abu Zuhri, who is based outside Gaza, said it accepted the ceasefire resolution and was ready to negotiate over the specifics.

                              This required a formula stipulating the total withdrawal of Israeli troops from Gaza and a swap of hostages held in Gaza for Palestinians jailed in Israel, he told Reuters.
                              "The U.S. administration is facing a real test to carry out its commitments in compelling the occupation to immediately end the war in an implementation of the U.N. Security Council resolution," Abu Zuhri said. Blinken said the Hamas statement was "a hopeful sign" but definitive word was still needed from the Hamas leadership inside Israeli-besieged Gaza. "That's what counts, and that's what we don't have yet."

                              After Blinken left for Jordan, a senior Israeli government official, who asked not to be identified, said the published proposal would enable Israel to achieve its war goals.
                              The official repeated Israel's longstanding stance that Hamas' military and governing capabilities in Gaza must be annihilated, and all hostages freed with Gaza posing no threat to Israel in the future.The war began when Hamas-led Palestinian militants stormed into southern Israel from Gaza on Oct. 7, killing more than 1,200 people and seizing more than 250 as hostages, according to Israeli tallies. Israel's retaliatory air and ground onslaught in Gaza has killed at least 37,164 Palestinians, the Gaza health ministry said in an update on Tuesday, and reduced most of the narrow, coastal enclave to wasteland, with malnutrition widespread.




                              Family members and supporters demand the immediate release of the hostages kidnapped during the deadly October 7 attack, as they protest outside a meeting attended by U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, amid the ongoing conflict in Gaza between Israel and Hamas, in Tel Aviv, Israel June 11,... Purchase Licensing Rights, opens new tab Read more

                              The U.S. is Israel's closest ally and biggest arms supplier but, along with much of the world, has become sharply critical of the huge civilian death toll in Gaza and the destruction and humanitarian calamity wrought by the Israeli offensive.
                              In the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, Palestinians reacted warily to the Security Council vote, fearing it could prove yet another ceasefire initiative that goes nowhere.
                              "We will believe it only when we see it," said Shaban Abdel-Raouf, 47, a displaced family of five sheltering in the central city of Deir Al-Balah, a frequent target of Israeli firepower.
                              "When they tell us to pack our belongings and prepare to go back to Gaza City, we will know it is true," he told Reuters via a chat app.

                              POST-WAR PLANNING 'IMPERATIVE', BLINKEN SAYS

                              Blinken said his talks were also addressing day-after plans for Gaza, including security, governance, and reconstruction of the enclave. "We've been doing that in consultation with many partners throughout the region. Those conversations will continue...it's imperative that we have these plans," he said.
                              As part of his eighth trouble-shooting trip to the Middle East since the Gaza conflict ignited, Blinken also sought steps to prevent months of border clashes between Israel and Lebanon's Hezbollah from escalating into a spillover war. On Monday, Blinken had talks in Cairo with President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi of Egypt, a key mediator in the war, in Cairo before proceeding to Israel, where he met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defence Minister Yoav Gallant.
                              Blinken's consultations in Israel on Tuesday included centrist former military chief Benny Gantz - who resigned from Israel's war cabinet on Sunday over what he said was Netanyahu's failure to outline a plan for ending the conflict.

                              Blinken, speaking later in the day at a conference in Jordan on the humanitarian response for Gaza, announced $404 million in aid for Palestinians and called on other donors to also step up.
                              Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi told the gathering on the Dead Sea that nations should force Israel to stop what he called the use of hunger as a weapon and remove obstacles to the distribution of humanitarian aid in Gaza.
                              Fighting continued with little respite on Tuesday as Israeli forces stepped up strikes on Gaza's southern city of Rafah, skirting the border with Egypt, a day after four soldiers were killed by a blast in a booby-trapped house claimed by Hamas.

                              Biden has repeatedly declared that ceasefires were close over the past several months, but there has been only one, week-long truce, in November, when over 100 hostages were freed in exchange for about 240 Palestinians held in Israeli jails. Israeli forces rescued four hostages held by Hamas in a commando raid into a crowded urban refugee camp in central Gaza on Saturday during which 274 Palestinians were killed by heavy Israeli firepower, according to Gaza's health authorities.


                              Reporting by Daphne Psaledakis in Tel Aviv and Nidal al-Mughrabi in Cairo; writing by Mark Heinrich; editing by Angus MacSwan, William Maclean
                              “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                              Mark Twain

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                              • I placed it here because I believe the war in Gaza is linked to hostilities in Lebanon-Israeli border. And a reminder that Israel can keep focused on multiple areas at once.


                                Hezbollah fires most rockets yet in war after Israel kills a top commander | Reuters

                                Hezbollah fires most rockets yet in war after Israel kills a top commander

                                By James Mackenzie and Laila Bassam
                                • Summary
                                • Abdallah was most senior Hezbollah figure killed since October
                                • Israel says it killed him in a strike on a command centre
                                • Hezbollah says it will increase intensity, force of attacks
                                • Group fires dozens of rockets into Israel

                                JERUSALEM/BEIRUT, June 12 (Reuters) - Hezbollah fired the most rockets it has launched at Israel in a single day since cross-border hostilities broke out eight months ago, as part of its retaliation on Wednesday for an Israeli strike which killed a senior Hezbollah field commander.
                                The Iran-backed Hezbollah and Israel have been trading fire since the eruption of the Gaza war in October, in steadily intensifying hostilities that have fuelled concern of a bigger confrontation between the heavily armed adversaries.

                                The Israeli strike in the south Lebanon village of Jouaiyya late on Tuesday killed three Hezbollah fighters alongside the senior field commander Taleb Abdallah, also known as Abu Taleb, Israel and three security sources in Lebanon said.
                                He was the most senior Hezbollah commander killed during eight months of hostilities, one of the sources said.
                                The Israeli military confirmed that it had killed him as well as the three other Hezbollah fighters in a strike on a command and control centre.

                                The sources in Lebanon said he was Hezbollah's commander for the central region of the southern border strip.
                                Hezbollah said it carried out at least 17 operations against Israel on Wednesday, including eight in response to what it called the "assassination" by Israel in Jouaiyya.
                                In one, Hezbollah fighters fired guided missiles at an Israeli military factory. In another, the group said it had attacked Israeli military headquarters in Ein Zeitim and Ami'ad, and an Israeli military air surveillance station in Meron.

                                A security source said the group fired some 250 rockets at Israel throughout Wednesday, the most in a day in this conflict so far. More than 100 rockets were launched at once, one of the group's biggest barrages since the hostilities began in October.
                                Speaking at a funeral procession for Abdallah in the Hezbollah-controlled southern suburbs of Beirut, senior Hezbollah official Hashem Safieddine said the group would increase the intensity, force and quantity of its operations against Israel in retaliation for his killing.
                                "If the enemy is screaming and moaning about what happened to it in northern Palestine, let him prepare himself to cry and wail," Safieddine said.SOUNDING SIRENS










                                Item 7 of 7 Members of Hezbollah carry the coffin of Taleb Abdallah, also known as Abu Taleb, a senior field commander of Hezbollah who was killed by what security forces say was an Israel strike yesterday night, during his funeral in Beirut's southern suburbs, Lebanon June 12, 2024. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir
                                [7/7]Members of Hezbollah carry the coffin of Taleb Abdallah, also known as Abu Taleb, a senior field commander of Hezbollah who was killed by what security forces say was an Israel strike yesterday night, during his funeral in Beirut's southern suburbs, Lebanon June 12, 2024. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir Purchase Licensing Rights, opens new tab

                                Sirens sounded in northern Israel.
                                Israeli jets hit a number of launch sites in southern Lebanon on Wednesday after projectiles were fired towards northern Israel, the military said.
                                The Israeli military earlier said Hezbollah had fired a barrage of around 50 launches from southern Lebanon into the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights.
                                In a second announcement, Israel said approximately 90 projectiles were identified crossing from Lebanon, a number of which were intercepted while others fell in several locations in northern Israel, causing fires in a number of areas.
                                It was not clear if the Israeli statements were referring to two separate launches.
                                The Israeli military said it fighter jets hit Hezbollah launch sites in two areas in southern Lebanon, while artillery shelled a third location.
                                It said there had been no casualties on the Israeli side but firefighters were battling fires started by the Hezbollah strikes in various areas.
                                Abdallah, the Hezbollah commander killed on Tuesday, was senior to Wissam Tawil, a high-level Hezbollah commander killed in an Israeli strike in January, said the sources in Lebanon, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
                                The Palestinian militant group Hamas called Abdallah a great leader, in a statement offering condolences for his death.
                                The security sources said the four Hezbollah members were likely targeted during a meeting.
                                Israeli strikes have killed some 300 Hezbollah fighters in Lebanon - more than it lost in 2006, when the sides last fought a major war, according to a Reuters tally which puts the number of civilians killed at around 80. Attacks from Lebanon have killed 18 Israeli soldiers and 10 civilians, Israel says.
                                The Israeli military says it has killed more than 320 Hezbollah members, including at least 100 targeted after field operatives gathered "precise high-quality intelligence" on them.
                                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                                Mark Twain

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