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  • Arms Sale

    Nearly 69 % of global arms sale is from the US, to the value of $38b in 2008.

    U.S. increases share of global arms sale amid recession
    WASHINGTON, Sept. 7 (Xinhua) -- The United States increased its share to more than two-thirds of all global arms sale last year, further bolstering its status as the number one weapons supplier in the world amid global economic recession.

    According to a new Congressional study, Washington inked arms deals valued at 37.8 billion U.S. dollars in 2008, accounting for 68.4 percent of the global total.

    That's a substantial hike over the 25.4-billion-dollar U.S. arms sales in 2007, Monday's New York Times commented on the figures.

    Italy was the number two arms seller last year, with a distant total at 3.7 billion dollars, followed by Russia.

    The U.S. arms sale increase was particularly noticeable against worldwide trends, affected by global economic downturn.

    The value of global arms sales recorded at 55.2 billion dollars last year, down 7.6 percent from that of the year before.
    Last edited by Merlin; 16 Sep 09,, 01:44.

  • #2
    Cash strapped Russia is on a drive to sell more arms.

    Russia seeks Mideast arms sales boost
    15 Sept [UPI] BEIRUT, Lebanon, Sept. 15 (UPI) -- Russia's defense industry is in the throes of a major sales drive in the Middle East as it seeks to bolster its dwindling fortunes.

    Saudi Arabia and Syria are the main targets, but swelling political tensions in the ever-volatile region, as well as a deep Arab distrust of Russian-built hardware that goes back to the Middle East's wars of the 1960s, could militate against Moscow's plans.

    Libya, Algeria and Yemen, all Soviet customers during the Cold War, are also on Moscow's target list. But the real prize is Saudi Arabia, for decades a U.S. bulwark in the Gulf but now pursuing a more independent foreign policy.

    There have been several reports in recent weeks, primarily out of Moscow, that negotiations with Saudi Arabia on a package of contracts worth some $2 billion was "nearing completion." ....

    Since the 1960s, the Saudis have bought their military equipment almost exclusively from the United States and Britain, with France trailing third.

    But according to Russian sources, the Saudis seek up to 150 helicopters, including Mi-17 and Mi-35 models and other weapons systems. The state media reported on Aug. 25 that negotiations to acquire an unspecified number of Mi-171B transport/assault helicopters were in the final stages. ....

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    • #3
      This $7.8 billion very advanced missile sale from US to Turkey is one of the biggest arms sale. While the Obama administration is happy with the revenue, and thinks of this sale as part of their Nato security umbrella, the Turkey media are not happy with it. They have their relation with their neighbors to weigh and balance. Iran share a common border with Turkey.


      Missile sale may worsen Turkey, Iran ties
      13 Sept [HurriyeDaily] The Obama administration’s disclosure of a possible $7.8 billion sale of its most advanced version of the Patriot air-defense missile to Turkey has sparked regional concerns with some warning that the arms package might deteriorate Ankara’s relations with Tehran.

      “For Turkey’s part, purchasing the Patriot missiles mean engaging in a conflict with Iran,” said professor Ímer Alpaslan Aksu.

      The Pentagon has notified Congress over weekend about it plans to sell the Patriot PAC-3 anti-missile batteries and related gear to Turkey, the only NATO ally bordering Iran. The Pentagon estimated the cost at $7.8 billion, which would be one of the biggest U.S. government-to-government arms sales in years and would mark a return of Turkey as a major U.S. arms buyer. ...
      Last edited by Merlin; 16 Sep 09,, 03:50.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Merlin View Post
        Nearly 69 % of global arms sale is from the US, to the value of $38b in 2008.
        Historically, the USSR had a far bigger share of the market than Russia does today, but the Cold War is over now. People don't like Russian weapons.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Silent Hunter View Post
          Historically, the USSR had a far bigger share of the market than Russia does today, but the Cold War is over now. ...
          I guess all these decades, the US would still be top in global arms manufacture and sale.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Silent Hunter View Post
            Historically, the USSR had a far bigger share of the market than Russia does today, but the Cold War is over now. People don't like Russian weapons.
            Which "people" did you mention? For example new NATO's members in Eastern Europe: are they ALLOWED to buy Russian weapons? Or the same with new governments in Iraq and Afghanistan?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by hanswu25 View Post
              Which "people" did you mention? For example new NATO's members in Eastern Europe: are they ALLOWED to buy Russian weapons? Or the same with new governments in Iraq and Afghanistan?
              I meant defence procurement people in general. Now I like Russian fighter jets a lot, but they're not up to the same standard as Western ones. Never have been. The USSR relied on numerical superiority.

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