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U.S. Response to Russia's Invasion of Ukraine

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    That high speed whirring you are hearing are Allen Dulles, George HW Bush, Ronald Reagan & other ghosts of the Republican Party spinning in their graves!

    Fvcking fellow travellers, indeed.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    GOP Rep. Mike Turner: Russian propaganda is 'being uttered on the House floor'
    House Intelligence Chair Mike Turner on Sunday said several of his GOP colleagues have repeated Russian propaganda on the House floor.


    Rep. Mike Turner, R-Ohio, at the Capitol on Jan. 9.

    GOP Rep. Mike Turner said Sunday that Russian propaganda has taken hold among some of his House Republican colleagues and is even "being uttered on the House floor."

    "We see directly coming from Russia ... communications that are anti-Ukraine and pro-Russia messages, some of which we even hear being uttered on the House floor," Turner, chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, said in an interview on CNN's "State of the Union."

    "There are members of Congress today who still incorrectly say that this conflict between Russia and Ukraine is over NATO, which of course it is not," he added.

    Turner's office did not immediately respond to NBC News' request for clarification about which members of Congress he was referring to.

    His comments come on the heels of remarks House Foreign Affairs Committee Chair Michael McCaul made this week about how Russian propaganda has taken root among the GOP.

    McCaul, a Texas Republican, told Puck News that he thinks "Russian propaganda has made its way into the United States, unfortunately, and it’s infected a good chunk of my party’s base."

    Turner and McCaul each tied Russia and its leader, Vladimir Putin, to other authoritarian leaders, including President Xi Jinping of China and Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea.

    "[The propaganda] makes it more difficult for us to really see this as an authoritarian versus democracy battle, which is what it is," Turner told CNN, adding, "President Xi of China, Vladimir Putin himself have identified as such."

    McCaul described explaining to colleagues that the threat of Russian propaganda is similar to threats made by other U.S. adversaries.

    "I have to explain to them what’s at stake, why Ukraine is in our national security interest," he said. "By the way, you don’t like Communist China? Well, guess what? They’re aligned [with Russia], along with the ayatollah [of Iran]. So when you explain it that way, they kind of start understanding it."

    The committee chairs' remarks about Russian propaganda came as they spoke about the need for Congress to approve more military aid to Ukraine.

    "Ukraine needs our help and assistance now, and this is a very critical time for the U.S. Congress to step up and provide that aid," Turner told CNN.

    The House in recent months has stalled on efforts to pass Ukraine aid, with Speaker Mike Johnson refusing to put an aid package the Senate passed in February that would provide resources to Ukraine, Israel and Taiwan on the House floor.

    Last week, Rep. Don Bacon said on NBC News' "Meet the Press" that he had commitments from Johnson and McCaul that they would allow a bipartisan Ukraine military aid package to advance to a vote.

    Rep. French Hill echoed this point on CBS' "Face the Nation" Sunday morning, saying he believes Johnson will bring Ukraine aid to the floor "immediately after completing the work on [the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] and FISA's extension — that deadline of April 19 makes it a priority for the first few days we're back."

    "I believe he's fully committed to bringing it up to the floor immediately thereafter," Hill added.

    But Bacon, R-Neb., also warned that Johnson could face a vote to oust him from the speakership if he moves forward with Ukraine aid.

    On Sunday, Turner downplayed the notion that Johnson's position was at risk over Ukraine aid.

    "I don't think he's at any risk," Turner said. "I think that what people have been referring to as the 'chaos caucus,' those individuals who are seeking attention for themselves and trying to stop all of the important work in Congress, are now seen as merely disruptive."

    Democrats have signaled that they could join several Republicans in helping to save Johnson's speakership if a motion to vacate, such as the one filed by Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene just before the House left for a two-week Easter recess, were brought to a vote.
    _______________

    Russia Russia Russia....

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    One of the great impacts of Sweden & Finland joining NATO is it is bringing into the light expanding involvement and cooperation with Scandinavian defense firms.

    https://www.defensenews.com/industry...ions-facility/

    Saab to expand US footprint with new munitions facility

    By Jen Judson
    Mar 26, 09:30 AM
    A Boeing-Saab Ground-Launched Small Diameter Bomb is fired during a test at Andoya Test Center in Norway. (Courtesy of Boeing and Saab)Saab is growing its footprint in the U.S. with a new facility that will manufacture ground combat weapons and missile systems, the head of the company’s American branch told Defense News.

    The new site is part of a global manufacturing push from the Swedish company to quadruple its global capacity to produce its ground combat weapons, Erik Smith said in a recent interview.

    “We certainly see a very broad and very large market opportunity for the kind of products that we have today and the kinds of products that are being developed right now,” Smith said. “As this facility ramps up, what you will see is a combination of products that Saab is very well known for and some new products that really haven’t hit the market yet.”

    The facility will feature advanced manufacturing capability and an innovation center to enhance munitions production capacity stateside, according to Smith. He also said it will support the production of components for the Ground-Launched Small Diameter Bomb, or GLSDB, system as well as close combat weapons.

    Saab is in the process of selecting a site, having issued a request for proposals. Six states are in the running, although Smith decline to identify candidates. He said the company plans to choose a site and break ground by the end of 2024, with plans to begin production by 2026.

    The company has rapidly expanded its locations across the U.S. in recent years. Last year, the company established two facilities focused on unmanned underwater vehicles in Rhode Island and Massachusetts as well as in California to support its work with U.S. Marine Corps training.

    In 2021, Saab opened an advanced aerostructure manufacturing facility in West Lafayette, Indiana, where it builds the rear fuselage for Boeing’s T-7 trainer aircraft.

    The company is based in Syracuse, New York, and runs its surveillance side of the business there.

    “We’ve had pretty substantial growth in our land systems portfolio,” Smith said, including winning a large contract in 2021 to provide a next-generation force-on-force training system to the Marine Corps.

    Additionally, the Air Force awarded a contract to Saab and its partner Boeing for the GLSDB system, which the company began to deliver to the service in 2023.

    A year ago, the U.S. pledged to send the GLSDB to Ukraine. The bomb has a range of 93 miles and can be launched from mobile artillery systems like the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System.

    For the new facility, the plan is to follow a similar model to what Saab did with its West Lafayette site. In that case, the first engineering and manufacturing development fuselages were built in Sweden, then, in parallel, Saab built the Indiana plant with high-end technology to produce the fuselages beginning with low-rate initial production, Smith explained.

    “We’re going to take advantage of some of the advanced technologies that are out there in manufacturing today and the evolution of the manufacturing space and capability since many, including our weapons and ammunition factories, were built many, many years ago,” Smith said. “You can imagine there’s some significant opportunities for efficiency improvement and … capability improvement overall, in terms of building these kinds of systems.”

    The facility will not just produce systems but will also have capability to test and integrate capability, he added.

    The facility in West Lafayette is about 100,000 square feet and is one of Saab’s larger facilities in the country, but the footprint needed for land combat systems is expected to be “significant,” Smith said.

    “I would envision this facility employing hundreds of people,” he added. And like in West Lafayette, the land secured for the facility will allow for a large amount of growth over time, he added.

    Saab is the 33rd largest defense contractor in the world, according to Defense News’ Top 100 list.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    One of the fun things in my job, one of the very few, I know which programs these funds are coming from. I also know some great Americans who moved heaven and earth. And their efforts were matched by some great trading partners in our vendors who agreed to expedite these refunds.

    This is, at best, a life ring. They need a lifeboat.

    Also with the EU going to provide frozen Russian assets worth Euro 2-3 billion this summer to Ukraine, if I was Ukraine I'd scrape up seed money to start getting contracts in place with US & Korean vendors of munitions, especially 155mm ammo.

    https://www.reuters.com/business/aer...ls-2024-03-12/

    US preparing new weapons package for Ukraine, officials say

    By Mike Stone, Idrees Ali and Patricia Zengerle
    March 12, 20241:10 PM EDT






    Item 1 of 2 Ukrainian servicemen of 79th brigade take part in training, amid Russia's attack on Ukraine, in Donetsk region, Ukraine March 4, 2024. REUTERS/Oleksandr Ratushniak/File Photo


    WASHINGTON, March 12 (Reuters) - The United States is preparing a new military aid package for Ukraine that could be worth as much as $400 million, two U.S. officials told Reuters on Tuesday, the first such move in months as additional funds for Kyiv remain blocked by Republican leaders in Congress.
    The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said an announcement was expected later on Tuesday.
    One of the officials said that the funding for this package is from credits refunded to the Pentagon for recent purchases and is expected to contain artillery.

    The U.S. Army, in particular, has been making huge purchases of munitions and vehicles to replenish stocks sent to Ukraine.
    The last drawdown was in December 2023 when funds to replenish stocks fell to zero.
    The White House has been scrambling to find ways to send more military assistance given the situation on the battlefield and the resistance to the funding from Republican hardliners.
    U.S. officials have also looked at options for seizing some $285 billion in Russian assets immobilized in 2022 and using the money to pay for Ukraine weaponry.

    The announcement is set to come as Poland’s president and prime minister meets President Joe Biden at the White House later on Tuesday to talk about ways to bolster support for Ukraine.
    The new weapons package was first reported by Reuters earlier on Tuesday.
    Using the funds that have been returned to replenish stocks opens a narrow window to urgently allow more aid to be sent from existing stocks as the Biden administration waits for supplemental funding to be passed by lawmakers.

    Biden, a Democrat, has backed military aid to Ukraine since Russia's full-scale invasion in 2022, while his likely Republican opponent in the Nov. 5 U.S. election, former president Donald Trump, has a more isolationist stance.
    Republican House of Representatives Speaker Mike Johnson, an ally of Trump, has so far refused to call a vote on a bill that would provide $60 billion more for Ukraine.
    The measure has passed the Democratic-run Senate, and both Republicans and Democrats in the House say it would pass if the chamber's Republican leaders allowed a vote.

    Leaders of U.S. intelligence agencies urgently pressed members of the House of Representatives on Tuesday to approve additional military assistance for Ukraine, saying it would not only boost Kyiv as it fights Russia but discourage Chinese aggression.
    Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy said on Monday that the situation along the front of the country's war with Russia was the best in three months, with Moscow's troops no longer advancing after their capture last month of the eastern city of Avdiivka.
    Zelenskiy, in an interview with France's BFM television, said Ukraine had improved its strategic position despite shortages of weaponry, but suggested the situation could change again if new supplies were not forthcoming.
    He said earlier that Russia is preparing a new offensive against Ukraine starting in late May or summer. Zelenskiy has said 31,000 Ukrainian soldiers have been killed since February 2022.
    Russia's capture of Avdiivka gave the Kremlin's forces breathing room in defending the Russian-held regional center of Donetsk, 20 kilometres (12 miles) to the east.
    Earlier this month, a top military commander said that Ukrainian troops were forced to leave several settlements neighboring Avdiivka due to Russia's continued offensive amid its own depleting stockpiles of munitions.
    Denmark will provide a new military aid package including Caesar artillery systems and ammunition to Ukraine worth around 2.3 billion Danish crowns ($336.6 million), the Danish Defence Ministry said in a statement on Tuesday.
    European Union countries are set to agree on a new 5 billion-euro ($5.46 billion) top-up to a fund used to finance military shipments to Ukraine, the Financial Times reported on Tuesday, citing four officials briefed on the discussions.

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Donald Trump won’t give ‘a penny’ to Ukraine if elected, Orbán says
    Hungarian leader praised Republican front-runner as a “man of peace.”


    According to Orbán, Trump has a “detailed plan” to end the war in Ukraine, which marries with Hungary’s interests

    Donald Trump will totally stop funding Ukraine if he wins the U.S. election in November, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán said following a meeting between the right-wing figureheads.

    “He will not give a penny in the Ukraine-Russia war,” Orbán told Hungarian state media Sunday. “Therefore, the war will end, because it is obvious that Ukraine can not stand on its own feet.”

    The longtime allies met last Friday at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, a summit which was lambasted by U.S. President Joe Biden.

    In an interview following the meeting — during which Trump and Orbán discussed “a wide range of issues” — the Hungarian prime minister praised the Republican front-runner as a “man of peace” who would bring an end to the all-out war in Ukraine, which Russian President Vladimir Putin has been waging since February 2022.

    “If the Americans don’t give money and weapons, along with the Europeans, the war is over,” he said. “And if the Americans don’t give money, the Europeans alone can’t finance this war. And then the war is over.”

    Trump, a confirmed NATO-skeptic, is dominating the Republican presidential primary, and currently leads Democratic incumbent Biden in polls across several key swing states.

    According to Orbán, Trump has a “detailed plan” to end the war in Ukraine, which marries with Hungary’s interests. Orbán, who has maintained contact with Putin amid Russia’s full-scale invasion, has repeatedly said he is opposed to sending more money and weapons to Kyiv.

    The Hungarian prime minister also recently endorsed Trump’s bid to return to the White House this year, solidifying a yearslong bromance.
    ___________

    We already knew that Trump would gift wrap Ukraine to Putin and Russia Russia Russia.

    I was going to say "And there goes Trump, back down on his knees in front of Putin".

    Except of course he never left.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by S2 View Post
    Wrong thread for Albanian air base? Maybe over in Worldwide Response?
    Ooops!

    Fat fingered it!

    Leave a comment:


  • S2
    replied
    Wrong thread for Albanian air base? Maybe over in Worldwide Response?

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by statquo View Post
    Is there a difference?
    One you can counter with real intel. The other is a lost cause no matter what you do.

    Leave a comment:


  • statquo
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    Disinformation or Trump's love for Putin?
    Is there a difference?

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by statquo View Post
    But if that guy in his mom's basement trolling the message boards and spewing disinformation is having an effect in shaping of the actual battlefield, is he still a civilian?
    If I believe a troll over my reccee, I should be shot!

    Originally posted by statquo View Post
    My question was more about state sponsored disinformation campaigns that have shaped the battlefield through troll farms. But even if there is a single person spewing disinformation and is having a real time effect on the battlefield, state sponsored or not, are they still a civilian?
    Only if you're stupid enough to believe a troll over your reccee.

    Originally posted by statquo View Post
    Has information warfare not evolved with social media, the anonymity of social media and the easiness of it beyond government spokespeople like Baghdad Bob and Lavrov that it should be treated as no different than actual battlefield systems? Disinformation campaigns have cut off ammo to the Ukrainians in the same way as a kinetic campaign against logistics systems and have led to Russian gains on the battlefield.
    Disinformation or Trump's love for Putin?

    Leave a comment:


  • statquo
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    But getting back to Statquot's point about info war against the Ukrainians, taking out the node can be legitimate military targetting but deliberately targeting the liars can be considered as actions against civilians in violations of the GC. Lying to the enemy is not a war crime nor does it make you an enemy combatant. If the person making the lie happens to die when the node is taken out is taken out, then that's collateral damage.
    But if that guy in his mom's basement trolling the message boards and spewing disinformation is having an effect in shaping of the actual battlefield, is he still a civilian? My question was more about state sponsored disinformation campaigns that have shaped the battlefield through troll farms. But even if there is a single person spewing disinformation and is having a real time effect on the battlefield, state sponsored or not, are they still a civilian?

    Has information warfare not evolved with social media, the anonymity of social media and the easiness of it beyond government spokespeople like Baghdad Bob and Lavrov that it should be treated as no different than actual battlefield systems? Disinformation campaigns have cut off ammo to the Ukrainians in the same way as a kinetic campaign against logistics systems and have led to Russian gains on the battlefield.







    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Russian disinformation is about immigration. The real aim is to undercut Ukraine aid


    Phill Cady holds a sign during a "Take Our Border Back" rally on Feb. 3, 2024, in Quemado, Texas. Online actors tied to the Kremlin have begun pushing misleading and incendiary claims about U.S. immigration in an apparent bid to target American voters ahead of the 2024 election.

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For Vladimir Putin, victory in Ukraine may run through Texas' Rio Grande Valley.

    In recent weeks, Russian state media and online accounts tied to the Kremlin have spread and amplified misleading and incendiary content about U.S. immigration and border security. The campaign seems crafted to stoke outrage and polarization before the 2024 election for the White House, and experts who study Russian disinformation say Americans can expect more to come as Putin looks to weaken support for Ukraine and cut off a vital supply of aid.

    In social media posts, online videos and stories on websites, these accounts misstate the impact of immigration, highlight stories about crimes committed by immigrants, and warn of dire consequences if the U.S. doesn't crack down at its border with Mexico. Many are misleading, filled with cherry-picked data or debunked rumors.

    The pivot toward the United States comes after two years in which Russia's vast disinformation apparatus was busy pushing propaganda and disinformation about its invasion of Ukraine. Experts who study how authoritarian states use the internet to spread disinformation say eroding support for Ukraine remains Russia's top priority — and that the Kremlin is just finding new ways to do it.

    “Things have shifted, even in the last few days," said Kyle Walter, head of research at Logically, a tech company that tracks disinformation campaigns. While experts and government officials have long warned of Russia's intentions, Walter said the content spotted so far this year "is the first indication that I’ve seen that Russia is actually going to focus on U.S. elections.”

    This month Logically identified dozens of pro-Russian accounts posting about immigration in the U.S., with a particular interest in promoting recent anti-immigration rallies in Texas. A recent Logically assessment concluded that after two years spent largely dedicated to the war in Ukraine, Russia’s disinformation apparatus has “started 2024 with a focus on the U.S.”

    Many posts highlight crimes allegedly committed by recent immigrants or suggest migrants are a burden on local communities. Some claims were posted by accounts with tiny audiences; others were made by state media sites with millions of followers.

    This week the accounts seized on the recent death of a Georgia nursing student and the arrest of a Venezuelan man who had entered the U.S. illegally and was allowed to stay to pursue his immigration case. The killing that quickly became a rallying cry for former President Donald Trump and other Republicans who suggest that migrants commit crimes more often than do U.S. citizens. The evidence does not support those claims.

    The content, crafted in English, has quickly found its way to websites and platforms popular with American voters. Footage of a recent anti-immigration protest broadcast by Russian outlet RT, for example, was racking up thousands of views this week on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter, and prompting angry replies from other users.

    The Russian outlet Sputnik ran a story this week about growing calls to build a U.S.-Mexico border wall, a priority for Trump, who failed to complete the job as president. An analysis of other sites that later linked to the Sputnik piece shows than half were in the U.S., according to data from the online analytics firm Semrush.com. Overall, Americans make up the English-language Sputnik's largest audience.

    U.S. officials have warned that Russia could seek to meddle in the elections of dozens of countries in 2024, when more than 50 nations accounting for half of the world's population are scheduled to hold national votes. While Russia has a strategic interest in the outcome of many of them — the European Parliament, for one — few offer the opportunity and the prize that America does.

    For Russia's bid to conquer Ukraine, this year's U.S. election stakes couldn't be higher. President Joe Biden has pledged to fully back Ukraine. Republicans have been far less supportive. Trump has openly praised Putin and the former president has suggested he would encourage Russia to attack America's NATO allies if they don't pay their fair share for the military alliance.

    More than half of Republicans believe the U.S. is spending too much on Ukraine, according to a recent poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that found Democrats to be much more supportive of additional aid.

    Soon after the war started, Russia mounted a disinformation campaign designed to cut into support for Ukraine. Claims included wild stories about secret U.S. germ warfare labs or Nazi conspiracies or that Ukrainian refugees were committing crimes and taking jobs from people who had welcomed them.

    That effort continues, but Russia also has shifted its attention to issues with no obvious tie to Moscow that are more likely to create cracks in the unity of its adversaries — for example immigration, or inflation, high-profile topics in the U.S. and Europe.

    “They're very savvy and understand the right buttons to push," said Bret Schafer, senior fellow and head of the information manipulation team at the Alliance for Securing Democracy, a Washington-based nonprofit. "If your ultimate objective is to reduce support for Ukraine, your inroad might be talking about how bad things are on the southern border. Their path to win this thing is to get the U.S. and the E.U. to stop sending weapons and aid to Ukraine.”

    A message left with the Russian Embassy in Washington wasn't immediately returned.

    America’s election may also be a tempting target for other authoritarian nations such as China and Iran that, like Russia, have shown a willingness to use online propaganda and disinformation to further their objectives.

    The online landscape has dramatically shifted since Russia sought to meddle in America's 2016 presidential race won by Trump. Platforms such as Facebook and Instagram have banned many Russian state accounts and built new safeguards aimed at preventing anyone from exploiting their sites. In one recent example, Meta, the owner of Facebook, announced last fall that it had identified and stopped a network of thousands of fake accounts created in China in an apparent effort to fool American voters.

    Other platforms, including X, have taken a different approach, rolling back or even eliminating content moderation and rules designed to stop disinformation. Then there is TikTok, whose ties to China and popularity with young people have set off alarms in several state capitals and Washington.

    Artificial intelligence is another concern. The technology now makes it easier than ever to create audio or video that is lifelike enough to fool voters.

    Social media is no longer the only battleground either. Increasingly, Russia and other disinformation spreaders use encrypted messaging sites or websites that masquerade as legitimate news outlets.

    “A lot of their activity has moved off the major platforms to places were they can operate more freely,” said John Hultquist, chief analyst at Mandiant Intelligence, a cybersecurity firm monitoring Russian disinformation.

    Walter, Logically's research director, said he is most concerned about disinformaton on X and TikTok this year, given their lack of controls and their popularity, especially with young voters. TikTok's ties to China have raised national security concerns.

    He said that while election years tend to highlight the dangers of disinformation, the most effective information operations are launched years in advance. America's adversaries have spent a long time studying its politics, building online networks and cultivating domestic divisions.

    Now comes the payoff.

    “They don’t need to put a ton of effort into causing disinformation," Walter said. "They’ve already laid the groundwork leading up to 2024.”

    ________

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Biden officials weigh giving Ukraine weapons without replacing U.S. stocks right away

    Biden administration officials met Tuesday at the Pentagon to discuss ways to fill some of Ukraine’s urgent needs for artillery and ammunition quickly, including possibly drawing down U.S. stockpiles without replenishing them immediately or without waiting for more money from Congress, say two senior administration officials and a congressional official.

    In the meeting, officials discussed various ways the Pentagon could resupply critical artillery and ammunition that Ukraine is expected to run out of soon, even while the White House’s request for new funding from Congress remains stalled, the officials said. No decisions have been made, according to the officials.

    The discussions reflect growing alarm in the administration that Ukraine is poised to run out of key weaponry in the next few weeks, including 155 mm artillery rounds and air defense munitions.

    Not all administration officials support the idea of sending a tranche of aid to Ukraine as a stopgap move, however. Some administration and congressional officials are concerned that such a move could imperil White House negotiations with Congress, particularly House Republican leaders, to get roughly $60 billion in new Ukraine aid through the chamber. Other officials are wary of the idea because it could put the U.S. military’s stockpiles below levels that are considered necessary for sufficient readiness.

    But after months of fiercely protecting stockpiles in the name of military readiness, Pentagon officials are now warming to the idea of accepting some risk to U.S. readiness in order to keep Ukraine in the fight.

    A spokesperson for the White House National Security Council said, "We are focused on urging the House of Representatives to pass the national security supplemental package as soon as possible. Ukraine needs the full resources in that package and Speaker Johnson should put it to a vote, where it would overwhelmingly pass, since there is no other way to fully meet Ukraine's needs."

    In a statement, a Pentagon spokesperson said, “The DoD continues to urge Congress to pass a supplemental to support Ukraine in its time of need and to replenish our stocks.”

    The House is not expected to move on Ukraine aid until at least late March. But even if that happens, the process is not expected to be swift, given GOP opposition in the House to a Senate bill that passed earlier this month.

    The Pentagon still has about $4 billion in congressionally approved Presidential Drawdown Authority funding, meaning it can provide $4 billion worth of weapons and equipment from U.S. stockpiles to Ukraine. But the Pentagon does not have enough approved funding available to replace the weapons and equipment after the U.S. sends it. Without funding, Biden administration officials must decide whether the risk of depleting of U.S. stockpiles without guarantees of when they’ll be replenished is a risk worth taking.

    The idea of providing artillery and ammunition from U.S. stockpiles, even without a supplemental, has been on the table for a few weeks, according to a congressional official, but it is a last resort move when Congress has no more options. The official said that there is momentum now and that if the president approves this now, it could undermine progress that is being made in Congress and damage their argument that the supplemental is critical now.

    Two congressional officials say the goal is to pass Ukraine funding in the third week of March in order to sustain that country in its war against Russia and they anticipate a vote by the end of March. If the House can’t get the funding passed by then, the administration can take the ammunition from U.S. stockpiles, “but to do it now would absolutely kill us,” one congressional official said.
    _______

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    But getting back to Statquot's point about info war against the Ukrainians, taking out the node can be legitimate military targetting but deliberately targeting the liars can be considered as actions against civilians in violations of the GC. Lying to the enemy is not a war crime nor does it make you an enemy combatant. If the person making the lie happens to die when the node is taken out is taken out, then that's collateral damage.

    Leave a comment:

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