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  • Ukraine Elections and Political Developments

    The Ukraine presidential election will be held on May 25. The front runner is a recent entry, Petro Poroshenko, aka the Chocolate King. He hardly seems like the kind of candidate that Russia would approve of, given his western leanings. Can he win?



    Petro Poroshenko (C) with his wife and son


    Entrepreneur Petro Poroshenko is seen as one of the front-runners for the Ukrainian presidency, and will be hoping to gain the support of those who see a European future for Ukraine.

    He is an experienced MP, though currently unaffiliated to any of the country's political parties, and the only oligarch to have supported the pro-European opposition from the start.

    The 48-year-old is known as "the chocolate king" for his ownership of Ukraine's largest confectionery manufacturer, Roshen.

    He also owns 5 Kanal TV, the most popular news channel in Ukraine, which has shown clear pro-opposition sympathies during the political crisis. Forbes estimated his wealth at $1.6bn (961m) in March 2013.
    Suprising support

    A poll published on 26 March showed 25% cent of Ukrainians supported Mr Poroshenko, putting him far ahead of political heavyweights like former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko and leading politician Vitaly Klitschko, with 8% and 9% respectively.

    Only two months ago Mr Klitschko was believed to be the opposition's key presidential candidate. He has since pulled out of the race, and thrown his support behind Mr Poroshenko.
    Petro Poroshenko and Vitaly Klitschko Former boxer Mr Klitschko (R) has given up his own presidential ambitions to throw his weight behind Mr Poroshenko

    Ukrainian media have interpreted this somewhat surprising support for Mr Poroshenko as a reaction to the opposition's dithering and inability to find common ground during and after the anti-government protests that toppled former President Viktor Yanukovych.

    Some believe the reaction against opposition leaders and the novelty of Mr Poroshenko's candidacy give him good grounds to defeat Ms Tymoshenko, his main rival in the election.
    'New way of living'

    Mr Poroshenko comes from the mainly Russian-speaking Odessa region in southern Ukraine, although his political stronghold is believed to be in the central Vinnytsya region, where he started his business and political career.

    He kicked off his presidential campaign in Vinnytsya with a rally there on 29 March.
    Newspaper picture of Poroshenko and Tymoshenko Yulia Tymoshenko - for whom Mr Poroshenko served as foreign minister - is now one of his main rivals

    The main slogan of Mr Poroshenko's election campaign is "A new way of living".

    He portrays himself as a pragmatic politician who sees Ukraine's future in Europe, but hopes to mend relations with Russia, using the diplomatic skills he developed as Ukrainian foreign minister.

    His pledges are to implement local governance reform, grant more powers to the country's regions, facilitate economic reforms, and improve the investment climate.
    Long experience

    Mr Poroshenko has been elected to parliament several times and has worked with both the pro-European and pro-Russian political camps in Ukraine.

    He was foreign minister in Ms Tymoshenko's government from 2009 to 2010, and briefly an economic development and trade minister in 2012.

    He was one of the founders of Viktor Yanukovych's Party of Regions. After helping to set it up in 2001, however, he left the same year to lead Viktor Yushchenko's Our Ukraine electoral bloc.

    He was also one of the main figures of the Orange Revolution that brought Mr Yushchenko and Ms Tymoshenko to power in 2004. Mr Yushchenko is a godfather to Mr Poroshenko's children.

    [url=http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26822741]BBC News - Profile: Petro Poroshenko, Ukraine's 'chocolate king'[/u
    To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

  • #2
    This is the line-up: The number 2 guy, Klitschko, the former boxer, has dropped out to support the number Poroshenko.





    The submission to the Central Election Commission (CEC) of documents for the registration of candidates for president of Ukraine in early presidential elections has ended.
    Main candidates for Ukrainian president determined
    To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

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    • #3
      Ukrainian media have interpreted this somewhat surprising support for Mr Poroshenko as a reaction to the opposition's dithering
      Eh, in my opinion Klitchko stepping back has far more to do with Ms Tymoshenko's person. And not just those leaked anti-Russian tirades, the woman isn't really considered kosher by most of the Ukrainian electorate.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kato View Post
        Eh, in my opinion Klitchko stepping back has far more to do with Ms Tymoshenko's person. And not just those leaked anti-Russian tirades, the woman isn't really considered kosher by most of the Ukrainian electorate.

        This is detailed run down of most of the candidates. Seems balanced. It may shed more light on Klitchko's change of heart. Seems he is considered too inexperienced. He'll like run for mayor of Kiev and has Poroshenko's support.

        The Election for President of Ukraine: An Analysis | Euromaidan PR
        To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

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        • #5
          Klitchko dropped out so as to not fracture/dilute the anti-Yanukovych coalition. No one with any sense wants the moderate vote diluted so that a far-right nationalist could eek out a win. Tymoshenko would do well to follow Klitchko's lead.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Minskaya View Post
            Klitchko dropped out so as to not fracture/dilute the anti-Yanukovych coalition. No one with any sense wants the moderate vote diluted so that a far-right nationalist could eek out a win. Tymoshenko would do well to follow Klitchko's lead.
            Does that seem remotely likely? She doesn't come across as the 'bow out gracefully' type.

            I'm not au fait with Ukraine's Presidential elections Minnie. Is there a first round & then a final one if nobody gets over 50% or does it work some other way? How do you expect it to fall at this point?
            sigpic

            Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Minskaya View Post
              Klitchko dropped out so as to not fracture/dilute the anti-Yanukovych coalition. No one with any sense wants the moderate vote diluted so that a far-right nationalist could eek out a win. Tymoshenko would do well to follow Klitchko's lead.
              Minnie:

              What do think about Poroshenko?
              To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
                Does that seem remotely likely? She doesn't come across as the 'bow out gracefully' type.
                It is a possibility. Have her views changed since Maidan or is she still vainglorious and a power addict? We shall see.

                Originally posted by Bigfella View Post
                I'm not au fait with Ukraine's Presidential elections Minnie. Is there a first round & then a final one if nobody gets over 50% or does it work some other way? How do you expect it to fall at this point?
                Not sure if any changes have been made, but I believe a 50% majority is required. Barring some major gaffe by Poroshenko, I believe he has enough border-to-border support to win.

                I think the episode below (captured on video and broadcast throughout Ukraine) endeared him to many Ukrainians who were unsure. On the night of 12 March, he visited the Crimean capital of Simferopol to protest the looming referendum and annexation to Russia. He boldly walked through Simferopol while hounded and cursed by an angry pro-Russian crowd. No way around it. This... is chutzpah.

                sigpic

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Minskaya View Post
                  It is a possibility. Have her views changed since Maidan or is she still vainglorious and a power addict? We shall see.
                  I hope so, but I'm not confident. Vainglorious power addicts tend to see themselves at the centre of every narrative. The big hope is that if she looks set to lose she pulls out rather than be embarrassed & tries t opposition it as 'for the good of the nation'.

                  Not sure if any changes have been made, but I believe a 50% majority is required. Barring some major gaffe by Poroshenko, I believe he has enough border-to-border support to win.

                  I think the episode below (captured on video and broadcast throughout Ukraine) endeared him to many Ukrainians who were unsure. On the night of 12 March, he visited the Crimean capital of Simferopol to protest the looming referendum and annexation to Russia. He boldly walked through Simferopol while hounded and cursed by an angry pro-Russian crowd. No way around it. This... is chutzpah.
                  I see that the Putinistas have adopted his concept of free speech - one way. Gutsy move. I guess Poroshenko was too high profile to get the Reshat Ametov treatment.
                  sigpic

                  Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

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                  • #10
                    Very insightful interview from February, as the demonstrations in Kiev were ramping up. For me, a westerner, it helped me better understand the POV of both Ukraine and Russia.

                    To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

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                    • #11
                      Very informative video. I love that Poroshenko is fluent in English, it really helps me understand his character.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JAD_333 View Post
                        Very insightful interview from February, as the demonstrations in Kiev were ramping up. For me, a westerner, it helped me better understand the POV of both Ukraine and Russia.
                        Recorded November 25th last year.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by snapper View Post
                          Recorded November 25th last year.
                          Thanks, snapper. I heard the word February in the interview, ass-umed. :)
                          To be Truly ignorant, Man requires an Education - Plato

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                          • #14
                            First aired November 25th but probably recorded earlier (around 20th) as he speaks about Vilnius with hope and by the 25th everyone knew Yanukovych wouldn't sign.

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                            • #15
                              One other option;



                              The Ukrainian Internet Party candidate.



                              Use of Dark Side of the Force



                              The Sith Lord "promises to build the Death Star to protect Ukraine’s borders, make Sith the second official language and raise salaries to cosmic levels".
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by snapper; 02 Apr 14,, 11:03.

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