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2021-2022 Russo-Ukrainian War

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  • TopHatter
    replied
    Germany and Netherlands to supply six more howitzers to Kyiv

    MADRID (Reuters) - Germany and the Netherlands will deliver six additional howitzers to Ukraine, the defence ministers of both countries said on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Madrid on Tuesday.

    Each country will provide three of the artillery weapons, Germany's Christine Lambrecht and Kajsa Ollongren from the Netherlands told reporters, on top of 12 howitzers the countries have already sent to Ukraine.

    "We show our resolve and our commitment to Ukraine, and not to give in to this Russian aggression," Ollongren said.

    Commenting on NATO's announcement to have more than 300,000 troops at high readiness from 2023 in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, Lambrecht said Germany would provide one division, some 15,000 troops, for these forces, including around 65 planes and 20 ships.

    "Germany is ready to do its share, NATO must be strong and this needs to show in troop numbers as well," Lambrecht told reporters.
    __________

    Every bit helps but for cryin' out loud, get that that shit to Ukraine NOW and quit dragging your feet!

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Some more info from Trent Telenko presenting a logistics side effect from and increased use of artillery.

    A thread by Trent Telenko


    These photos from @UAWeapons show a very important reality of the war in Ukraine.

    Intense artillery wars fill the roads with super sharp debris like these fragments from a detonated M31A1 GMLRS.

    Tire logisticswith a global starvation hook.

    There are two things militaries always get wrong in a major war.

    The amount of artillery munitions used and the amount of tires you need to support a war.






    Major wars create road debris from h--l.

    Military trucks and wheeled light utility vehicles run over that debris and lose their tires.





    And if you don't maintain those military truck tires before the war the situation is an order of magnitude worse.





    Artillery fragmentation simply chews up everything, but especially unarmored trucks and lighter vehicles.

    And the truck or utility part that is hardest to replace are the tires...




    ...because so many are lost so quickly at rates much faster than replacement production.

    Russia trying to replace tactical trucks with civilian vehicles only makes the problem worse.




    All that does is cost shift tire losses to the Russian economy.

    There is some photographic evidence that the use of lots of Russian civilian vehicles in Ukraine is hitting the tire supply in the Russian economy.





    This is incredibly bad news for world food security. Summer is when the agricultural sector buys a lot of tractor and other tires to support farming.

    Does anyone think the Putin Regime is paying attention to that knock on effect of the "Ukraine Special Operation?"





    The Russo-Ukrainian War is about to enter a new and much more dangerous phase for the Global South because Russia's "Special Operation" in Ukraine is going to jeopardize the Russian harvest.

    And Russia is a major grain exporter.

    9/End

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by Red Team View Post

    Col.

    I do not have the source off the top of my head, but I remember reading something about their encrypted comms working off of local civilian 5G towers. As moronic as that sounds from a layman's perspective, that at least puts some incentive on the Russians not to destroy infrastructure that they themselves may be reliant on.
    The Ukrainians have done a variety things to improve the resilience and to harden their cell networks.

    Here are 3 good articles discussing what has been done. Also discussed is cell networks cranking up in the separatist areas.

    Another area where the Ukrainians learned and applied lessons from the 2014 War.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/0...-work-00014487

    https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-...le-for-ukraine

    https://blog.adaptivemobile.com/the-...ukraine-part-3

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by Monash View Post
    Again perhaps its a matter of numbers. By all accounts Russia is already short of PGMs which leaves area attack missions using multiple unguided rackets for each cell tower. Certainly doable, but is that an efficient use of resources given their other priorities? They might not think so.
    At 20,000 rounds a day flattening empty buildings, I think they can spare a few.

    Leave a comment:


  • Monash
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    No, not planes. Rockets. I trust the Russian birdbrains not to miss a target as I trust a whore house with my credit card.
    Again perhaps its a matter of numbers. By all accounts Russia is already short of PGMs which leaves area attack missions using multiple unguided rackets for each cell tower. Certainly doable, but is that an efficient use of resources given their other priorities? They might not think so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by Monash View Post
    Possibly but that means putting planes up in the air and the Russian air force seems to be struggling re: number of combat missions they can sustain on a daily basis.
    No, not planes. Rockets. I trust the Russian birdbrains not to miss a target as I trust a whore house with my credit card.

    Leave a comment:


  • Monash
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    Even if they don't have enough HARMs, it's 1960s technology and technique to trianagulate the location of stationary sigs. Then, plaster the area with dumb munitions. If you can phone home, plaster the area again.

    In the mean time, the Russians should take advantage of a weakened Ukrainian C3 and press their advantage.

    But then again, that may be asking too much Russian co-ordination. Lord knows the Ukrainians could not take advantage of a destroyed CAA HQ.
    Possibly but that means putting planes up in the air and the Russian air force seems to be struggling re: number of combat missions they can sustain on a daily basis.

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Originally posted by Red Team View Post
    I do not have the source off the top of my head, but I remember reading something about their encrypted comms working off of local civilian 5G towers. As moronic as that sounds from a layman's perspective, that at least puts some incentive on the Russians not to destroy infrastructure that they themselves may be reliant on.
    Yeah moronic. They've got at least 3 birds in orbit for that kind of thing ... unless they're not working.

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    Even if they don't have enough HARMs, it's 1960s technology and technique to trianagulate the location of stationary sigs. Then, plaster the area with dumb munitions. If you can phone home, plaster the area again.

    In the mean time, the Russians should take advantage of a weakened Ukrainian C3 and press their advantage.

    But then again, that may be asking too much Russian co-ordination. Lord knows the Ukrainians could not take advantage of a destroyed CAA HQ.

    Leave a comment:


  • Red Team
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    It amazes me that the Russians have not knock down every cell tower nor flatten every TV broadcast dish yet. They've got plenty of HARMs.
    Col.

    I do not have the source off the top of my head, but I remember reading something about their encrypted comms working off of local civilian 5G towers. As moronic as that sounds from a layman's perspective, that at least puts some incentive on the Russians not to destroy infrastructure that they themselves may be reliant on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Monash
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    It amazes me that the Russians have not knock down every cell tower nor flatten every TV broadcast dish yet. They've got plenty of HARMs.
    Do they? The thing is that a whole lot of numbers 'numbers' around Russia's military capabilities have proven to be somewhat 'rubbery' - at least when compared to when compared to pre-war western intelligence assessments. Also are their HARMS' designed to engage that kind of civilian EM traffic and do they have any land based launch platforms? Plus there's a huge number of cell towers and at one missile per tower it may not be practicable, especially as towers can be replaced quickly (most companies keep at least a small stock of portable/emergency equipment on hand and lots more could be shipped in fairly quickly from the EU etc.

    Just trying to think through reasons why they haven't done as you suggested BTW.
    Last edited by Monash; Today, 01:46.

    Leave a comment:


  • Officer of Engineers
    replied
    It amazes me that the Russians have not knock down every cell tower nor flatten every TV broadcast dish yet. They've got plenty of HARMs.

    Leave a comment:


  • S2
    replied
    How we fight remains part of the back drop to this war. David Barno shares thoughts here-

    The Other Big Lessons That the U.S. Army Should Learn From Ukraine

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Originally posted by Monash View Post
    Just imagine being one of the staff assigned to his HQ. (With my luck I'd probably be assigned the job of de linting his bellybutton every morning before helping him get dressed).
    A mental picture I did not need...

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
    Confirmed: Fake news

    The photo is of a fat man wearing a Ukrainian uniform

    https://www.reddit.com/r/AbsoluteUni...tary_personel/
    Kinda figured that would be the case. He looked far more like the morbidly obese Gravy SEALs here in the U.S.

    Leave a comment:

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