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Afghanistan: how the US army battled it out with the British

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  • #31
    "...I would have thought if things were integrated that assets could be allocated to critical missions?"

    Then integrate the troops as well and not, instead, generate nat'l fiefdoms out of specific geographic areas.

    Let's be clear that when we talk about "integrated pools" of air assets what we REALLY are talking about is a U.S. lift mission to support all NATO forces nationwide. I think this article (and links) reveal that a shortage of choppers, per se, was never the problem. The problem always there was matching assets to requirements and recognizing technical limitations...EARLY ON.

    We were in Afghanistan between 2001-2006 before the Brits made their first serious foray into Helmand. The U.S. Army had already accumulated hundreds of flying hours over a range of climatic and geographic conditions that should have provided a data base-line. Whether this was true, or accessed if true, is the question? The link suggests the U.K. has made huge strides since 2006. One has to wonder to what purpose now?

    Puma, Chinook and Serendipity-Grand Logistics 4 April 2011
    "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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    • #32
      Originally posted by S2 View Post
      Then integrate the troops as well and not, instead, generate nat'l fiefdoms out of specific geographic areas.

      Let's be clear that when we talk about "integrated pools" of air assets what we REALLY are talking about is a U.S. lift mission to support all NATO forces nationwide. I think this article (and links) reveal that a shortage of choppers, per se, was never the problem. The problem always there was matching assets to requirements and recognizing technical limitations...EARLY ON.

      Puma, Chinook and Serendipity-Grand Logistics 4 April 2011
      Sir, my point was related to logistical resupply and the eventual evacuation of the British. It was an impression gained through the Rotor Pool for Medevac. Your previous response made me wonder whether or not this was the wrong impression and did not apply to other scenarios. Nat'l fiefdoms always seem to take root in these multinational expeditions. It isn't British centric, It has been around AFAIK for Australians, since Vietnam. Said article suggests they have made huge strides, you say to what purpose? But I am rather surprised that it doesn't really seem as integrated at the basic level of stopping poorly supplied units being in effect overrun by not being able to request help from anyone other than your own 'nat'l fiefdom' as you put it...
      Ego Numquam

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      • #33
        Chunder Reply

        "...Said article suggests they have made huge strides, you say to what purpose?..."

        A bit after-the-fact seeing that our deployments are in the other direction now. Hopefully these airframes shall find useful employment down the road should it again come to that.
        "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
        "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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        • #34
          Originally posted by zraver View Post
          The article wasn't about Au-US relations though.
          The article gave the impression it was harking over from British imperialism/class, sleeping separately that is - as if it was a core point.
          As another nation that does the same I thought it was worthy to point out. If the journalistic material is looking to make a point, he may need to dig deeper, because it most likely goes beyond not singing coombayah at bed time.

          Regards
          Ego Numquam

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