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  • Murdered Pakistani Journalist Had Claimed ISI Threat

    Murdered Pakistani Journalist Had Claimed ISI Threat



    By LEE FERRAN
    June 1, 2011
    A Pakistani journalist found apparently tortured to death this week had said he had been threatened by the country's intelligence service because of his sometimes scathing reports on the Pakistani armed forces and terror groups, colleagues and a Human Rights Watch official said today.

    Syed Saleem Shahzad, the 40-year-old Pakistan bureau chief for Asia Times Online, was found dead on Tuesday a week after the news outlet published an exclusive report written by Shahzad that suggested al Qaeda had infiltrated the Pakistani navy ahead of a brazen assault on a naval base. Police said his body showed signs of torture.

    Though militants are often suspected in the deaths of journalists in Pakistan, after Shahzad's death both a colleague of his and a researcher for Human Rights Watch in Pakistan came forward to say Shahzad had said in past months he felt threatened by Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency.

    A spokesperson for the ISI told The Associated Press any alleged link between the ISI and Shahzad's death was "absurd" and Shahzad's brother-in-law said "never was there any threat," according to a report by National Public Radio. Pakistan's Interior Minister, Rehman Malik, visited Shahzad's home to offer his condolences and told reporters it was possible the journalist was killed over a personal matter.

    But in October 2010, Shahzad told his editor at the Asia Times Online he had been summoned to the ISI offices after publishing another exclusive report about Pakistan's release of a major Taliban figure. During the meeting, the ISI demanded Shahzad retract the story and reveal his sources, but Shahzad refused, prompting a veiled threat, according to a report today by Asia Times Online.

    Shahzad described the ISI meeting in an email to Human Rights Watch researcher Ali Dayan Hasan and said, "I am forwarding this email to you in case something happens to me or my family in the future."

    Asia Times Online reported Shahzad sent a similar email to his editor there. When the editor suggested Shahzad lay low a while following the ISI meeting, he reportedly responded, "If I hold back and don't do my job, I might as well just make the tea."

    In a rare public statement, an unnamed ISI official told Pakistan's state news agency today the meeting with Shahzad was cordial and no such threats were ever made.

    "It is regrettable that some sections of the media have taken upon themselves to use the incident for targeting and maligning the ISI," the report said, paraphrasing the official. "Baseless accusations against the country's sensitive agencies for their alleged involvement in Shahzad's murder are totally unfounded."

    Shahzad's colleagues at Asia Times Online and his own biography posted there reveal a history of run-ins with the feared intelligence agency.

    "More recently, I am known for writing bold stories about sensitive institutions like the apex court and the armed forces," Shahzad wrote in the biography when he was in his early 30s. "Exposing the role of the Inter-Services Intelligence agency in Pakistani politics landed me in trouble, but intervention at a very high level by leaders of the national press forced the state apparatus to take a step back."

    Colleague: 'It Had to Be the ISI'

    Secretary of State Hillary Clinton condemned Shahzad's killing late Tuesday night after Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari ordered an immediate inquiry into the death.

    "[Shahzad's] work reporting on terrorism and intelligence issues in Pakistan brought to light the troubles extremism poses to Pakistan's stability," Clinton said in a statement. "We support the Pakistani government's investigation into the circumstances surrounding his death."

    However, in a pair of biting editorials, Shahzad's colleagues at Asia Times Online criticized the government for its investigations into the deaths of journalists in Pakistan.

    "These are honorable and noble sentiments that will resonate around the world," one editorial said of Zardari's promise of inquiry. "The trouble is, like an echo, the words will quickly fade, and most likely nothing will be done... It will be business as usual in a country that had the most journalist deaths in the world in 2010 - 44 - and four prominent newsmen killed this year for simply doing their job. None of their killers has been brought to justice. Not one."

    Pakistan ranks among the top ten most dangerous countries for journalists according to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists. The CPJ estimates 20 percent of the murders of journalists are attributable to "government officials."

    After his visit to Shahzad's home, Interior Minister Malik said orders had been given that journalists should carry small arms in order to protect themselves, Pakistan's Geo News reported.

    In another sarcasm-laced editorial, another of Shahzad's colleagues and "brother" directly accuses the ISI of being behind Shahzad's disappearance and death.

    "After all, when a Pakistani journalist -- not a foreigner -- writes that al-Qaeda is infiltrated deep inside the Pakistani military establishment, one's got to act with utmost courage. So you abduct the journalist. You torture him. And you snuff him," writes Pepe Escobar. "Now they finally got him. Not an al Qaeda or jihadi connection. Not a tribal or Taliban connection... It had to be the ISI -- as he knew, and told us, all along."

    Malik told reporters that should any evidence emerge connecting the ISI to Shahzad's death, he would investigate.

    Shahzad was buried in his hometown of Karachi today as hundreds of friends, relatives and colleagues mourned, according to an AP report.

    Pakistani Journalist Saleem Shazhad Killed, Had Claimed ISI Threats - ABC News
    Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
    -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

  • #2
    Saleem Shahzad's most recent piece written just prior to his murder

    Al-Qaeda had warned of Pakistan strike

    By Syed Saleem Shahzad



    ISLAMABAD - Al-Qaeda carried out the brazen attack on PNS Mehran naval air station in Karachi on May 22 after talks failed between the navy and al-Qaeda over the release of naval officials arrested on suspicion of al-Qaeda links, an Asia Times Online investigation reveals.

    Pakistani security forces battled for 15 hours to clear the naval base after it had been stormed by a handful of well-armed militants.

    At least 10 people were killed and two United States-made P3-C Orion surveillance and anti-submarine aircraft worth US$36 million each were destroyed before some of the attackers escaped through a cordon of thousands of armed forces.

    An official statement placed the number of militants at six, with four killed and two escaping. Unofficial sources, though, claim there were 10 militants with six getting free. Asia Times Online contacts confirm that the attackers were from Ilyas Kashmiri's 313 Brigade, the operational arm of al-Qaeda.

    Three attacks on navy buses in which at least nine people were killed last month were warning shots for navy officials to accept al-Qaeda's demands over the detained suspects.

    The May 2 killing in Pakistan of Osama bin Laden spurred al-Qaeda groups into developing a consensus for the attack in Karachi, in part as revenge for the death of their leader and also to deal a blow to Pakistan's surveillance capacity against the Indian navy.

    The deeper underlying motive, though, was a reaction to massive internal crackdowns on al-Qaeda affiliates within the navy.

    Volcano of militancy
    Several weeks ago, naval intelligence traced an al-Qaeda cell operating inside several navy bases in Karachi, the country's largest city and key port.

    "Islamic sentiments are common in the armed forces," a senior navy official told Asia Times Online on the condition of anonymity as he is not authorized to speak to the media.

    "We never felt threatened by that. All armed forces around the world, whether American, British or Indian, take some inspiration from religion to motivate their cadre against the enemy. Pakistan came into existence on the two-nation theory that Hindus and Muslims are two separate nations and therefore no one can separate Islam and Islamic sentiment from the armed forces of Pakistan," the official said.

    "Nonetheless, we observed an uneasy grouping on different naval bases in Karachi. While nobody can obstruct armed forces personnel for rendering religious rituals or studying Islam, the grouping [we observed] was against the discipline of the armed forces. That was the beginning of an intelligence operation in the navy to check for unscrupulous activities."

    The official explained the grouping was against the leadership of the armed forces and opposed to its nexus with the United States against Islamic militancy. When some messages were intercepted hinting at attacks on visiting American officials, intelligence had good reason to take action and after careful evaluation at least 10 people - mostly from the lower cadre - were arrested in a series of operations.

    "That was the beginning of huge trouble," the official said.

    Those arrested were held in a naval intelligence office behind the chief minister's residence in Karachi, but before proper interrogation could begin, the in-charge of the investigation received direct threats from militants who made it clear they knew where the men were being detained.

    The detainees were promptly moved to a safer location, but the threats continued. Officials involved in the case believe the militants feared interrogation would lead to the arrest of more of their loyalists in the navy. The militants therefore made it clear that if those detained were not released, naval installations would be attacked.

    It was clear the militants were receiving good inside information as they always knew where the suspects were being detained, indicating sizeable al-Qaeda infiltration within the navy's ranks. A senior-level naval conference was called at which an intelligence official insisted that the matter be handled with great care, otherwise the consequences could be disastrous. Everybody present agreed, and it was decided to open a line of communication with al-Qaeda.

    Abdul Samad Mansoori, a former student union activist and now part of 313 brigade, who originally hailed from Karachi but now lives in the North Waziristan tribal area was approached and talks begun. Al-Qaeda demanded the immediate release of the officials without further interrogation. This was rejected.

    The detainees were allowed to speak to their families and were well treated, but officials were desperate to interrogate them fully to get an idea of the strength of al-Qaeda's penetration. The militants were told that once interrogation was completed, the men would be discharged from the service and freed.

    Al-Qaeda rejected these terms and expressed its displeasure with the attacks on the navy buses in April.

    These incidents pointed to more than the one al-Qaeda cell intelligence had tracked in the navy. The fear now was that if the problem was not addressed, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) supply lines could face a new threat. NATO convoys are routinely attacked once they begin the journey from Karachi to Afghanistan; now they could be at risk in Karachi port. Americans who often visit naval facilities in the city would also be in danger.

    Therefore, another crackdown was conducted and more people were arrested. Those seized had different ethnic backgrounds. One naval commando came from South Waziristan's Mehsud tribe and was believed to have received direct instructions from Hakeemullah Mehsud, the chief of the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (Pakistan Taliban). Others were from Punjab province and Karachi, the capital of Sindh province.

    After Bin Laden was killed by American Navy Seals in Abbottabad, 60 kilometers north of Islamabad, militants decided the time was ripe for major action.

    Within a week, insiders at PNS Mehran provided maps, pictures of different exit and entry routes taken in daylight and at night, the location of hangers and details of likely reaction from external security forces.

    As a result, the militants were able to enter the heavily guarded facility where one group targeted the aircraft, a second group took on the first strike force and a third finally escaped with the others providing covering fire. Those who stayed behind were killed.

    Next: Recruitment and training of militants

    Syed Saleem Shahzad is Asia Times Online's Pakistan Bureau Chief and author of Inside al-Qaeda and the Taliban: Beyond Bin Laden and 9/11 published by Pluto Press, UK. He can be reached at saleem_shahzad2002@yahoo.com

    (Copyright 2011 Asia Times Online (Holdings) Ltd. All rights reserved. Please contact us about sales, syndication and republishing.)

    Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan
    Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
    -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

    Comment


    • #3
      Here is the email SS sent out. I don't really see any sort of serious or direct threat in it. SS himself admits in it that the meeting was very polite and cordial, and he is interpreting the last comments related to a 'favor' from the Admiral as a 'threat', when it is by no means an obvious or clear threat.

      Ali Dayan Hasan of Human Rights Watch has forwarded me an email that the late Shahzad had forwarded to him in October 2010 with the words “I am forwarding this email to you for your record only if in case something happens to me or my family in future.”

      (Beginning of email)

      For future reference:

      Meeting details as on October 17, 2010 at the ISI headquarters Islamabad between DG Media Wing ISI, Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir and Syed Saleem Shahzad, the Bureau Chief Pakistan for Asia Times Online (Hong Kong). Commodore Khalid Pervaiz, the Deputy Director General of Media Wing ISI was also present during the conversation.

      Agenda of the meeting: discussion on Asia Times Online story published on October 15, 2010, titled Pakistan frees Taliban commander (see Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan).

      The meeting discussed the following issues.

      1-Syed Saleem Shahzad told Rear Admiral Adnan that an intelligence channel leaked the story. However, he added that story was published only after a confirmation from the most credible Taliban source. Syed also explained that DG ISPR was sent a text message about the story, but he did not respond.

      2- Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir had the view that story caused a lot of embracement for the country but observed that issuing a denial from the government side is no solution. He suggested Syed Saleem Shahzad should write a denial of the story.

      3- Syed Shahzad refused to comply with demand and termed it impractical.

      4-Rear Admiral Adnan was curious to know the source of the story as it is a shame that information would leak from the office of a high profile intelligence service.

      5- Syed Shahzad called it an intelligence leak but did not specify the source.

      6-The conversation was held in an extremely polite and friendly atmosphere and there was no mince word in the room at any stage. Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir also offered Syed Saleem Shahzad a favor in following words.

      “I must give you a favor. We have recently arrested a terrorist and have recovered a lot of data, dairies and other material during the interrogation. The terrorist had a hit list with him. If I find your name in the list, I will certainly let you know,”
      Pakistan journalist Saleem Shahzad dead: Another one bites the dust | Asian Correspondent

      The ISI appeared to be more interested in his alleged source within the ISI than anything else, and killing SS months later would not have benefitted them in tracking that source down.
      Pakistan is not going to be a theocratic state to be ruled by priests with a divine mission - Jinnah
      https://twitter.com/AgnosticMuslim

      Comment


      • #4
        Several weeks ago, naval intelligence traced an al-Qaeda cell operating inside several navy bases in Karachi, the country's largest city and key port.

        "Islamic sentiments are common in the armed forces," a senior navy official told Asia Times Online on the condition of anonymity as he is not authorized to speak to the media.

        "We never felt threatened by that. All armed forces around the world, whether American, British or Indian, take some inspiration from religion to motivate their cadre against the enemy. Pakistan came into existence on the two-nation theory that Hindus and Muslims are two separate nations and therefore no one can separate Islam and Islamic sentiment from the armed forces of Pakistan," the official said.

        "Nonetheless, we observed an uneasy grouping on different naval bases in Karachi. While nobody can obstruct armed forces personnel for rendering religious rituals or studying Islam, the grouping [we observed] was against the discipline of the armed forces. That was the beginning of an intelligence operation in the navy to check for unscrupulous activities."

        The official explained the grouping was against the leadership of the armed forces and opposed to its nexus with the United States against Islamic militancy. When some messages were intercepted hinting at attacks on visiting American officials, intelligence had good reason to take action and after careful evaluation at least 10 people - mostly from the lower cadre - were arrested in a series of operations.

        "That was the beginning of huge trouble," the official said.

        Those arrested were held in a naval intelligence office behind the chief minister's residence in Karachi, but before proper interrogation could begin, the in-charge of the investigation received direct threats from militants who made it clear they knew where the men were being detained.

        The detainees were promptly moved to a safer location, but the threats continued. Officials involved in the case believe the militants feared interrogation would lead to the arrest of more of their loyalists in the navy. The militants therefore made it clear that if those detained were not released, naval installations would be attacked.

        It was clear the militants were receiving good inside information as they always knew where the suspects were being detained, indicating sizeable al-Qaeda infiltration within the navy's ranks. A senior-level naval conference was called at which an intelligence official insisted that the matter be handled with great care, otherwise the consequences could be disastrous. Everybody present agreed, and it was decided to open a line of communication with al-Qaeda.

        Abdul Samad Mansoori, a former student union activist and now part of 313 brigade, who originally hailed from Karachi but now lives in the North Waziristan tribal area was approached and talks begun. Al-Qaeda demanded the immediate release of the officials without further interrogation. This was rejected.

        The detainees were allowed to speak to their families and were well treated, but officials were desperate to interrogate them fully to get an idea of the strength of al-Qaeda's penetration. The militants were told that once interrogation was completed, the men would be discharged from the service and freed.

        Al-Qaeda rejected these terms and expressed its displeasure with the attacks on the navy buses in April.

        These incidents pointed to more than the one al-Qaeda cell intelligence had tracked in the navy. The fear now was that if the problem was not addressed, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) supply lines could face a new threat. NATO convoys are routinely attacked once they begin the journey from Karachi to Afghanistan; now they could be at risk in Karachi port. Americans who often visit naval facilities in the city would also be in danger.

        Therefore, another crackdown was conducted and more people were arrested. Those seized had different ethnic backgrounds. One naval commando came from South Waziristan's Mehsud tribe and was believed to have received direct instructions from Hakeemullah Mehsud, the chief of the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (Pakistan Taliban). Others were from Punjab province and Karachi, the capital of Sindh province.
        With respect to the excerpt above from SS's last article - it is a positive comment on the military's efforts to crack down on terrorist sympathisers within its ranks, and according to SS, the military was successful enough to really make Al Qaeda angry.

        This does not sound like the kind of 'negative reporting' that would push the ISI to 'murder' the journalist responsible.
        Pakistan is not going to be a theocratic state to be ruled by priests with a divine mission - Jinnah
        https://twitter.com/AgnosticMuslim

        Comment


        • #5
          Am,

          Here is the email SS sent out. I don't really see any sort of serious or direct threat in it. SS himself admits in it that the meeting was very polite and cordial, and he is interpreting the last comments related to a 'favor' from the Admiral as a 'threat', when it is by no means an obvious or clear threat.
          It is a veiled threat.

          Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir also offered Syed Saleem Shahzad a favor in following words.

          “I must give you a favor. We have recently arrested a terrorist and have recovered a lot of data, dairies and other material during the interrogation. The terrorist had a hit list with him. If I find your name in the list, I will certainly let you know,”
          Saleem Shehzad was already fearing for his life from the ISI as he had already discussed this with his colleagues who are now raising their voice for his sake.

          The ISI appeared to be more interested in his alleged source within the ISI than anything else, and killing SS months later would not have benefitted them in tracking that source down.
          He was tortured before being killed. The torture may just have been to extradite information.
          Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
          -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Agnostic Muslim View Post
            With respect to the excerpt above from SS's last article - it is a positive comment on the military's efforts to crack down on terrorist sympathisers within its ranks, and according to SS, the military was successful enough to really make Al Qaeda angry.

            This does not sound like the kind of 'negative reporting' that would push the ISI to 'murder' the journalist responsible.
            Read the article again and you may get to the real problem which might make ISI uncomfortable. Saleem Shehzad exposed openly in the media how deeply infiltrated AQ is within the Pakistani military.
            Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
            -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

            Comment


            • #7
              Pakistan journalist Saleem Shahzad dead: Another one bites the dust


              Four days ago, Saleem Shahzad, a journalist working for the Asia Times, penned this report on the extent of al-Qaeda’s infiltration in the Navy at lower levels, and how the attack on PNS-Mehran tied into an investigation of the same. At the top of the story, we read that “this is the first article in a two-part report”. How wrong he was.

              Two days ago, Saleem Shahzad disappeared.

              Today, he re-appeared, dead.

              I am more angry than sad right now. I literally cannot believe that the ISI acted with such impunity. They can pick someone one up, torture and murder them, and expect absolutely no legal recrimination.

              Remember, these people’s job is to protect us. But they torture and kill us, and protect Osama bin Laden and Hafiz Saeed instead.

              They do this in Balochistan most every day, what with student activists, nationalists, and regular party workers ending up in gutters, but they have made the entirely rational calculation that no one in Pakistan cares about Balochistan — watch the video in this Cafe Pyala post if you don’t believe me. This feels somehow different, because his abduction was front page news. And yet they still went ahead and killed him.

              When Saleem Shahzad disappeared, I honestly thought he’d just get beaten up and abused, like they did Umar Cheema. I never actually considered the possibility that they would kill him, especially when Human Rights Watch had “credible” information that he had been picked up by the ISI.

              I suppose it’s too much to ask anyone to actually investigate this. Our “independent” judiciary stopped making a fuss about missing people when it was no longer politically convenient to do so, i.e when Musharraf was no longer around. I expect more of the same here.

              Update: Ali Dayan Hasan of Human Rights Watch has forwarded me an email that the late Shahzad had forwarded to him in October 2010 with the words “I am forwarding this email to you for your record only if in case something happens to me or my family in future.”

              (Beginning of email)

              For future reference:

              Meeting details as on October 17, 2010 at the ISI headquarters Islamabad between DG Media Wing ISI, Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir and Syed Saleem Shahzad, the Bureau Chief Pakistan for Asia Times Online (Hong Kong). Commodore Khalid Pervaiz, the Deputy Director General of Media Wing ISI was also present during the conversation.

              Agenda of the meeting: discussion on Asia Times Online story published on October 15, 2010, titled Pakistan frees Taliban commander (see Asia Times Online :: South Asia news, business and economy from India and Pakistan).

              The meeting discussed the following issues.

              1-Syed Saleem Shahzad told Rear Admiral Adnan that an intelligence channel leaked the story. However, he added that story was published only after a confirmation from the most credible Taliban source. Syed also explained that DG ISPR was sent a text message about the story, but he did not respond.

              2- Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir had the view that story caused a lot of embracement for the country but observed that issuing a denial from the government side is no solution. He suggested Syed Saleem Shahzad should write a denial of the story.

              3- Syed Shahzad refused to comply with demand and termed it impractical.

              4-Rear Admiral Adnan was curious to know the source of the story as it is a shame that information would leak from the office of a high profile intelligence service.

              5- Syed Shahzad called it an intelligence leak but did not specify the source.

              6-The conversation was held in an extremely polite and friendly atmosphere and there was no mince word in the room at any stage. Rear Admiral Adnan Nazir also offered Syed Saleem Shahzad a favor in following words.

              “I must give you a favor. We have recently arrested a terrorist and have recovered a lot of data, dairies and other material during the interrogation. The terrorist had a hit list with him. If I find your name in the list, I will certainly let you know,”

              (end of email)

              Update II: An earlier version of this post credited Declan Walsh for the photo above; it is actually courtesy Shahzad’s Facebook page.

              Pakistan journalist Saleem Shahzad dead: Another one bites the dust | Asian Correspondent
              Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
              -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

              Comment


              • #8
                Now they are bumping off their own journalists? ISI has been digging its own grave for quite sometime now.
                Last edited by hammer; 02 Jun 11,, 12:32.
                Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie!'...till you can find a rock. ;)

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Government itself has arrested a former SSG-N officer who was kicked out after a court martial from the navy 10 years ago.

                  PNS Mehran: Ex-Navy commando Kamran among five arrested

                  I don't think there was any point of silencing this ONE guy over a generally accepted fact. I think this conjecture is just being used to overplay the "infilitrated" aspect. It was a lapse in security by allowing former navy officers to have such influence to aid terrorists attacking the base.

                  Furthermore Saleem Shahzad's emphasis has been on Islamic sentiments in Pakistan navy, which is a no-brainer in almost all facets of Pakistani life. The unease with the junior officers is not related to Islamic sentiments but taking dictates from America and a lack of a foreign policy based Pakistan's national interests. For that matter, most people in Pakistan feel that way.

                  Is this something worth killing a guy for? I just don't see it. Imran Khan said worse things about the army.

                  Imran warns of rift in army over terror war

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The Abduction was most certainly done by the ISI or affiliated agencies.. They probably did not intend to kill him..a previous example was someone called Umer Chema abducted and beaten by the ISI..In Shahzad'S case the beating must have gone a little out of hand.. considering the fella had survived a bullet wound recently so.. few hard slaps and blows while questioning must have had unintended consequences..

                    Cheers

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Currywurst View Post
                      The Abduction was most certainly done by the ISI or affiliated agencies.. They probably did not intend to kill him..a previous example was someone called Umer Chema abducted and beaten by the ISI..In Shahzad'S case the beating must have gone a little out of hand.. considering the fella had survived a bullet wound recently so.. few hard slaps and blows while questioning must have had unintended consequences..

                      Cheers
                      Killing someone is a little more than 'a little out of hand'. If you do not intend to kill someone you threaten them or their family and perhaps rough then up a little as a warning. He was found tortured and beaten to death.. that is intentional. That is murder.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tronic View Post
                        Read the article again and you may get to the real problem which might make ISI uncomfortable. Saleem Shehzad exposed openly in the media how deeply infiltrated AQ is within the Pakistani military.
                        There is nothing in the article that suggests institutional ISI complicity with AQ or other terrorists, which is a much more serious charge that has been made by plenty of other Pakistani and foreign journalists, all of whom are still alive.

                        While SS does point to extremist 'cells within the military' this is not a new allegation or argument, and he also provides a lot of detail about the military's efforts to combat those cells and how the military's efforts really squeezed AQ.

                        I think it is you who has to read SS's comments without a mind prejudiced against the ISI.
                        Pakistan is not going to be a theocratic state to be ruled by priests with a divine mission - Jinnah
                        https://twitter.com/AgnosticMuslim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tronic View Post
                          It is a veiled threat.
                          No it is not - if you were a high profile figure, would you not want law enforcement or intelligence to warn you if you appeared on a terrorist target list? Trying to interpret an offer for information regarding any potential threats in the future is really pushing the 'indirect threat' argument. Under your argument, no journalist or public figure should ever be warned about potentially being a terrorist target lest the provision of such information be interpreted as a 'threat'.

                          Saleem Shehzad was already fearing for his life from the ISI as he had already discussed this with his colleagues who are now raising their voice for his sake.
                          SS quite clearly mentioned in his email that the meeting with ISI officials took place in a very friendly and cordial manner. SS may have indeed feared for his life (the world he lived in and the job he did made that clear), but that does not translate to the ISI being the threat to his life, nor is there any information to support the allegation of ISI complicity in his abduction and death.

                          He was tortured before being killed. The torture may just have been to extradite information.
                          Why now? Why no one else? Again, quite a few other journalists have written a lot worse about the ISI and Pakistani Military.
                          Pakistan is not going to be a theocratic state to be ruled by priests with a divine mission - Jinnah
                          https://twitter.com/AgnosticMuslim

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Asim Aquil View Post
                            The Government itself has arrested a former SSG-N officer who was kicked out after a court martial from the navy 10 years ago.

                            PNS Mehran: Ex-Navy commando Kamran among five arrested

                            I don't think there was any point of silencing this ONE guy over a generally accepted fact. I think this conjecture is just being used to overplay the "infilitrated" aspect. It was a lapse in security by allowing former navy officers to have such influence to aid terrorists attacking the base.

                            Furthermore Saleem Shahzad's emphasis has been on Islamic sentiments in Pakistan navy, which is a no-brainer in almost all facets of Pakistani life. The unease with the junior officers is not related to Islamic sentiments but taking dictates from America and a lack of a foreign policy based Pakistan's national interests. For that matter, most people in Pakistan feel that way.
                            His emphasis was not on Islamic sentiments within Pak navy, either this is denial mode, or you haven't read his article I've posted. Go to my second post.


                            Is this something worth killing a guy for? I just don't see it. Imran Khan said worse things about the army.

                            Imran warns of rift in army over terror war
                            Imran Khan is saying nothing which the army doesn't want him to. His anti-US dribble helps the Pak army milk more from the US. We all saw this tactic being employed by the Pak army during the Raymond Davis saga.
                            Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
                            -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Agnostic Muslim View Post
                              No it is not - if you were a high profile figure, would you not want law enforcement or intelligence to warn you if you appeared on a terrorist target list? Trying to interpret an offer for information regarding any potential threats in the future is really pushing the 'indirect threat' argument. Under your argument, no journalist or public figure should ever be warned about potentially being a terrorist target lest the provision of such information be interpreted as a 'threat'.
                              Saleem Shehzad certainly didn't think it was a courteous heads up. He feared for his life and sent that email to Human Rights Watch, lest something happens to him. Its not me who considered that a threat, it was Saleem Shehzad.



                              SS quite clearly mentioned in his email that the meeting with ISI officials took place in a very friendly and cordial manner. SS may have indeed feared for his life (the world he lived in and the job he did made that clear), but that does not translate to the ISI being the threat to his life, nor is there any information to support the allegation of ISI complicity in his abduction and death.
                              Yet, that is not what Saleem Shehzad communicated to his boss, his colleagues or even to his friends at Human Rights Watch. His email too, was sent quoting specifically that line as a veiled threat. Whether you wish to believe it or not doesn't matter, Human Rights Watch and all of Saleem Shehzad's colleagues are in an uproar against the ISI.


                              Why now? Why no one else? Again, quite a few other journalists have written a lot worse about the ISI and Pakistani Military.
                              I take it Umar Cheema was also not abducted by the ISI.

                              Who Attacked Umar Cheema?

                              Umar Cheema, an investigative reporter for a major Pakistani newspaper, The News, has long tackled difficult and risky topics. His articles have questioned the conduct and performance of the Army and the intelligence services and detailed accusations of corruption against President Asif Ali Zardari.

                              Now he is taking perhaps the biggest risk of his career: speaking publicly about being abducted by assailants he believes were associated with the spy agency.

                              As Mr. Cheema told Jane Perlez of The Times, he was on his way home from dinner recently when men in black commando garb stopped his car, blindfolded him and drove him out of town, where he was beaten and videotaped in humiliating positions. Six hours later, he was dumped on a road 100 miles from Islamabad.

                              “I have suspicions and every journalist has suspicions that all fingers point to the ISI,” he said, referring to the Inter-Services Intelligence agency. He said that earlier this year, an ISI officer summoned him to a coffee shop in Islamabad and warned him to fall into line.

                              Other journalists and politicians who got on the wrong side of the Pakistani military and intelligence services have also been threatened and attacked. Most are too fearful to talk openly about their ordeals. Mr. Cheema has long stood apart. He won a Daniel Pearl Journalism Fellowship in 2008 and during that time worked in The Times’s newsroom for six months. He has done all Pakistanis a favor by refusing to be intimidated.

                              Under Pakistan’s civilian government, journalists today are more free to do their jobs than during the years of the military dictatorship. But according to the most recent State Department human rights report, news media outlets, reporters and their families are still often the targets of threats and attacks by security forces, political parties and militants. The government needs to make clear that it will no longer abet or condone this behavior. And it needs to find out who abducted Mr. Cheema and bring them to justice.
                              A version of this editorial appeared in print on September 29, 2010, on page A30 of the New York edition.

                              Who Attacked Umar Cheema? - NYTimes.com
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