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Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar Captured In Karachi

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  • Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar Captured In Karachi

    Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar Captured In Karachi-NYT Feb.16, 2010

    This is an absolutely HUGE story. Baradar, chronicled in this NEWSWEEK article last summer, is the operational head of the Quetta Shura and their #2 man after Omar himself.

    Powerful news indeed.
    "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

  • #2
    Baradar Captured

    Bump...
    "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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    • #3
      This is a huge story, but why did the ISI burn him?
      Last edited by zraver; 16 Feb 10,, 05:31.

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      • #4
        Zraver Reply

        The article suggests that there's been an internal shift in thinking by COAS and, perhaps, his comments recently about defining strategic depth indicate such.

        “'A peaceful and friendly Afghanistan can provide Pakistan a strategic depth.' He asked the US and Nato to come out with a clear strategy on Afghanistan.

        General Kayani who last week participated in Nato commanders’ conference in Brussels said Pakistan was prepared to train the Afghan National Army which would help improve relations between the two nations. He said he hoped the offer would get a positive response.


        'If we get more involved with the ANA (Afghan National Army) there’s more interaction and better understanding,' General Kayani said.

        'We have opened all doors ... It’s a win-win for Afghanistan, the United States, Isaf and Pakistan,'”

        There are a lot of ways to view his comments but it's entirely possible that he sees that Afghanistan can be neither peaceful while an insurgency rages nor friendly while Pakistan harbors its enemies. Whatever trust deficit has existed between America and Pakistan, the trust deficit between Afghanistan and Pakistan has been even more wide.
        "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
        "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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        • #5
          Meetings

          We've had a bevy of meetings involving him recently to include his Corps Commanders conference held in Rawalpindi as well as Generals McChrystal, Jones (NSC), and Caldwell (Cdr, NATO Training Mission).
          "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
          "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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          • #6
            This is the result of the enormous pressure being brought on by the Americans on both Pakistan.

            Unfortunately it is a tango with one step forward and two steps backward. This is the way the leadership in Pakistan has behaved post 9/11.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by zraver View Post
              This is a huge story, but why did the ISI burn him?
              Maybe the Pakistanis have come to their senses.

              The participation of Pakistan’s spy service could suggest a new level of cooperation from Pakistan’s leaders, who have been ambivalent about American efforts to crush the Taliban. Increasingly, the Americans say, senior leaders in Pakistan, including the chief of its army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, have gradually come around to the view that they can no longer support the Taliban in Afghanistan — as they have quietly done for years — without endangering themselves. Indeed, American officials have speculated that Pakistani security officials could have picked up Mullah Baradar long ago.
              Source:Secret Joint Raid Captures Taliban’s Top Commander

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              • #8
                sumob Reply

                "This is the result of the enormous pressure being brought on by the Americans on both Pakistan."

                Perhaps but not overnight. They've withstood eight years of pressure heretofore. Something else has occurred and it's probably occurred with Kiyani more than anyone else.

                Kiyani has seen the potential of combatting the TTP in SWA, SWAT, and Buner. He's also been privy to our intelligence support. He's aware of the beneficial effects that have occurred because of PREDATOR, i.e. B. Mehsud, H. Mehsud and many, many other enemies of Pakistan. He quite likely KNOWS that India isn't presently attacking Pakistan from diplomatic consulates in Afghanistan. He's had DEEP conversations with everybody whom matters on these issues within the United States. As such he knows our intentions, plans, and long-term objectives.

                While our leadership principles have no doubt delivered a drum-beat message, I don't think he's the kind of man to be pummelled into submission. More likely, he's seen the light and "come to Jesus" as we say.


                "Unfortunately it is a tango with one step forward and two steps backward. This is the way the leadership in Pakistan has behaved post 9/11."

                If one step, it's one giant leap for mankind. There's no question in my mind that Pakistan sees that it will have to ENGAGE Afghanistan if it wishes long term security instead of holding it hostage by the barrel of a gun. Engagement means competing with India on diplomatic and economic fronts while mending bridges with all elements of Afghan society. No zero sum for either India or Pakistan with Afghanistan being the clear winner...as it should be.

                Naturally, we'll need to see what evolves but EVOLUTION will be the key word. The Corps Commanders conference the other day may have been momentous.
                "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
                "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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                • #9
                  S2 reply

                  I quite agree with you with regards to General Kayani. He has proved to a very astute leader of PA. His role since taking over as COAS has definitely helped Pakistan recover from the political crisis his predecessor had pushed it into.

                  If one step, it's one giant leap for mankind. There's no question in my mind that Pakistan sees that it will have to ENGAGE Afghanistan if it wishes long term security instead of holding it hostage by the barrel of a gun. Engagement means competing with India on diplomatic and economic fronts while mending bridges with all elements of Afghan society. No zero sum for either India or Pakistan with Afghanistan being the clear winner...as it should be.

                  This is the only way forward for this region. As Pakistan moves forward on this they will find full support from Prime Minister Singh.

                  The Corps Commanders conference the other day may have been momentous.

                  Sir, that is an understatement.

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                  • #10
                    I think the best bet is to simply wait and watch. With the Pakistanis, you can never be jumping to conclusions too early. Only time will tell what the game plan is, and if Pakistan has finally come to its senses. I know I'm probably naturally biased, and by all means Kiyani may have seen the light, but the actions seem very un-Pakistan like and too good to be true; I'll wait and watch to see what unfolds in the next few weeks, maybe months.
                    Cow is the only animal that not only inhales oxygen, but also exhales it.
                    -Rekha Arya, Former Minister of Animal Husbandry

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by S-2 View Post
                      There's no question in my mind that Pakistan sees that it will have to ENGAGE Afghanistan if it wishes long term security instead of holding it hostage by the barrel of a gun. Engagement means competing with India on diplomatic and economic fronts while mending bridges with all elements of Afghan society.
                      S2,

                      I have heard about Afghan invasion of Pakistani positions along the disputed border though I not sure about the time-line (before the Russian invasion). Pakistan may even have legitimate fears that a stable Afghanistan may open a second front or incite Pashtoo aspirations when Pakistan is at its most vulnerable - when engaged in a war with India.

                      For a viable security framework, Afghanistan may have to accept the Durand line & the territorial integrity of Pakistan. Given that even the Taliban refused to accept the Durand line, what amount of influence can America wield in getting the Afghan govt to accept the Durand line? Or is America even interested?

                      Though this issue may look a tad pre-mature at this point of time, I presume it would nevertheless be in the minds of everybody with stakes in the region.
                      Last edited by pChan; 16 Feb 10,, 11:33.

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                      • #12
                        Given the history between the two nations, I am sure Pakistan will be looking forward to some sort of guarrantee from the US.

                        However the Durand line remains on the paper only as locals Pashtuns do not recognis this border.

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                        • #13
                          sumob Reply

                          "Given the history between the two nations, I am sure Pakistan will be looking forward to some sort of guarrantee from the US."

                          pChan's point is well-made and is a legitimate fear of Pakistanis. It will (or has been) need to be addressed and consolidated.

                          Part of what we've witnessed with Afghan taliban sanctuary is intended, I believe, to assure that Pashtun nationalist aspirations within their own country are deflected westward onto Afghanistan and not the reverse. The Punjab, admitted or not, remains the heart of Pakistan and that's easily tracked by the absence of government services the further west one heads past the Indus river.
                          "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
                          "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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                          • #14
                            pChan Reply

                            "Pakistan may even have legitimate fears that a stable Afghanistan may open a second front or incite Pashtoo aspirations when Pakistan is at its most vulnerable..."

                            Part of my response is encompassed in my reply to sumob. However, the real answer to such lies in Pakistani reconciliation with all ethnic elements of Afghanistan. Their relations with tajiks, hazara, uzbeks, and turkomen because of long Pakistani support to the pashtun taliban are abysmal. If we are ever successful in raising forth a nation that provides equal political access for all ethnic elements of Afghanistan then Pakistan must understand that they've some hatchets to bury with the aforementioned if they expect to be able to engage and compete for favor effectively inside Afghanistan.

                            If they do so, Pakistan currys favor with elements of Afghan society that don't hold pashtun aspirations. That would be valuable for all concerned.
                            "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
                            "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

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                            • #15
                              Sir,Baradar was considered to be an effective commander,even a brilliant one,but also one that was sometimes at odds with the rest of the Taliban leadership.I'm not saying that Pakistan plays at two heads,but they could.Solve the internal Taliban power struggles,get a pat on the back from US.
                              Those who know don't speak
                              He said to them, "But now if you have a purse, take it, and also a bag; and if you don't have a sword, sell your cloak and buy one. Luke 22:36

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