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China is the latest victim of Pakistan’s Islamist problem

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  • China is the latest victim of Pakistan’s Islamist problem

    China is the latest victim of Pakistan’s Islamist problem


    Locals in Balochistan tout China as the latest colonizing power

    July 20, 2021 | 9:52 am

    The aftermath of Wednesday’s bus attack, which killed 12 people, nine of whom were Chinese (Getty)


    Nine Chinese engineers were killed in an explosion near Pakistan’s Dasu hydroelectric dam last Wednesday. The government initially said that their bus suffered a ‘mechanical failure’ after it plunged into a ravine, but officials eventually admitted that the incident was a terror attack after Beijing decided to send its own investigators.

    China has now postponed work on the $65 billion China Pakistan Economic Corridor, a network of roads and infrastructure projects. The program represents Beijing’s largest overseas investment and is a critical part of its Belt and Road Initiative. While no one has claimed responsibility for Wednesday’s attack, the blast was orchestrated at a time when multiple militant groups are targeting China’s presence in the country.

    Since the 2015 inauguration of the project, which links the Pakistani region of Balochistan with Xinjiang, Baloch separatists have targeted Chinese projects in the province. The region was designated an independent khanate in the months before partition but ended up being consumed by the new Muslim state. As a result, it has seen decades of military operations to oversee the extraction of its rich resources, leading separatists to declare it an ‘occupied territory’. Meanwhile, the locals tout China as the latest colonizing power, with militias like the Balochistan Liberation Army launching multiple terror attacks aimed at Chinese industry.
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    But the most high-profile attacks have come not from Baloch separatists but the Pakistani Taliban. In April, the group launched a car bomb at the province’s most luxurious hotel where the Chinese ambassador was staying.

    Extremists have been able to capitalize on anti-China sentiment, further exacerbated by the persecution of Uighur Muslims. Islamabad has not helped the situation: Uighur refugees living in Pakistan have reportedly been abducted and handed over to the Chinese authorities. Balochs see a cruel irony in the Corridor, linking together two persecuted minorities. And so, even as the Afghan Taliban ban Uighur militants from joining their ranks in a bid to woo China, their counterparts in Pakistan are gradually transforming their anti-West rhetoric into a Sinocentric narrative.

    Pakistan is now working under complete Chinese influence — subordination, even — having given Beijing excessive control in the form of the Economic Corridor. From globally propagating China’s narrative of Uighur abuse to accepting trade terms dictated by Beijing, Islamabad’s subservience is unflinching.

    China today is heavily invested in a military-dominated autocratic Pakistan, from exploiting local resources, to enforcing heavily skewed economic deals, to mapping a totalitarian digital future, to strengthening the army’s influence over infrastructure projects and in turn the state. However, one front where Pakistan is not following Chinese instructions is its failure to completely eradicating jihadist groups in the country.

    Beijing was already irritated by persistent delays to the project, last week’s attack has reaffirmed their frustration at Islamabad. This was aptly expressed by the editor of Chinese state media outfit Global Times, who tweeted that ‘China’s missiles and special forces can be put into action’ against perpetrators of the terror attack on Chinese workers ‘if Pakistan’s capability is not enough’.
    The problem for Islamabad is that the country’s foreign policy is geared towards promoting the Taliban in neighboring Afghanistan. Pakistan is continuing a decades-old plan for South Asia, Kashmir and Kabul in particular, with the military establishment believing that an Islamized region would align with Pakistan’s interests over Hindu India. The ongoing negotiations between the diplomatically malleable Afghan Taliban and the Hindutva regime in India, however, is putting spanner into those works for Pakistan.

    The Islamist spillover into its own regions has risks, particularly when the Chinese are involved, but it also has its benefits too. The Pakistani army uses jihadist groups to target ethnic nationalist groups and to keep tabs on the civilian leadership. The gory assumption that jihadists can be tamed to hunt specific prey has killed over 80,000 Pakistanis.

    Now, Pakistan faces the task of convincing Beijing that it can protect Chinese infrastructure and citizens from these groups, even as it is unable to protect its own. That requires abandoning its decades-old commitment to South Asian jihad, albeit to conform to a new brand of grotesque totalitarianism.

    This article was originally published on The Spectator’s UK w
    I've been on sabatical for the past 5 years, so I'm playing catch up. Any comments analysis welcome to help bring me up to speed.
    In the realm of spirit, seek clarity; in the material world, seek utility.

    Leibniz

  • #2
    Originally posted by Parihaka View Post
    China is the latest victim of Pakistan’s Islamist problem



    I've been on sabatical for the past 5 years, so I'm playing catch up. Any comments analysis welcome to help bring me up to speed.
    Andrew Small covers both countries.

    Most dangerous country in the world to be Chinese ? You guessed it...

    Now that both are in an embrace let's see where it goes. Wish more of one on the other

    Pakistan will be China's Afghanistan.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 25 Jul 21,, 00:01.

    Comment


    • #3
      Insignificant

      Nine lives are less than nothing when the Pakistani PM himself clears everything that comes out of his mouth from Beiling. Pakistan is too important for Beijing and vice versa
      "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" ~ Epicurus

      Comment


      • #4
        And it appears the Chinese are trying to make nice with the Taliban, the spawn of the ISI.

        https://www.reuters.com/world/china/...on-2021-07-28/

        China says Taliban expected to play 'important' Afghan peace role


        Reuters


        Taliban meet Chinese officials as U.S. withdraws

        KABUL, July 28 (Reuters) - China told a visiting Taliban delegation on Wednesday it expected the insurgent group to play an important role in ending Afghanistan's war and rebuilding the country, the Chinese foreign ministry said.

        Nine Taliban representatives met Foreign Minister Wang Yi in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin on a two-day visit during which the peace process and security issues were discussed, a Taliban spokesperson said.

        Wang said the Taliban is expected to "play an important role in the process of peaceful reconciliation and reconstruction in Afghanistan", according to an account of the meeting from the foreign ministry.

        He also said that he hoped the Taliban would crack down on the East Turkestan Islamic Movement as it was a "direct threat to China's national security," referring to a group China says is active in the Xinjiang region in China’s far west.


        The visit was likely to further cement the insurgent group's recognition on the international stage at a sensitive time even as violence increases in Afghanistan. The militants have a political office in Qatar where peace talks are taking place and this month sent representatives to Iran where they had meetings with an Afghan government delegation.


        "Politics, economy and issues related to the security of both countries and the current situation of Afghanistan and the peace process were discussed in the meetings," Taliban spokesperson Mohammed Naeem tweeted about the China visit.

        Naeem added that the group, led by Taliban negotiator and deputy leader Mullah Baradar Akhund, was also meeting China's special envoy for Afghanistan and that the trip took place after an invitation from Chinese authorities.

        Asked about the Taliban visit, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in New Delhi that it was a "positive thing" if Beijing was promoting a peaceful resolution to the war and "some kind of (Afghan) government ... that's truly representative and inclusive."

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        "No one has an interest in a military takeover by the Taliban, the restoration of an Islamic emirate," he said in an interview with CNN-News18 television.

        Security in Afghanistan, with which China shares a border, has been deteriorating fast as the United States withdraws its troops by September. The Taliban has launched a flurry of offensives, taking districts and border crossings around the country while peace talks in Qatar's capital have not made substantive progress.

        "(The) delegation assured China that they will not allow anyone to use Afghan soil against China," Naeem said. "China also reiterated its commitment of continuation of their assistance with Afghans and said they will not interfere in Afghanistan's issues but will help to solve the problems and restoration of peace in the country."

        Reporting by Kabul bureau; Additional reporting by Beijing bureau; Editing by Kevin Liffey, William Maclean and Grant McCool
        “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
        Mark Twain

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        • #5
          Wang said the Taliban is expected to "play an important role in the process of peaceful reconciliation and reconstruction in Afghanistan", according to an account of the meeting from the foreign ministry.

          He also said that he hoped the Taliban would crack down on the East Turkestan Islamic Movement as it was a "direct threat to China's national security," referring to a group China says is active in the Xinjiang region in China’s far west.
          This is what every one is hoping for in the end. That Afghanistan does not again become a safe harbour for terrorists.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by antimony View Post
            Insignificant

            Nine lives are less than nothing when the Pakistani PM himself clears everything that comes out of his mouth from Beiling. Pakistan is too important for Beijing and vice versa
            You're missing the long pattern of attacks and increased frequency of late

            Attacks On Chinese Workers In Pakistan Raise Regional Security Questions For Beijing | RFERL | Jul 30 2021

            An attack by gunmen on two Chinese workers in Pakistan on July 28 is the latest in a string of incidents that has left Beijing reevaluating how best to protect its citizens and interests in the country, which has become strategically important as the centerpiece of its multibillion-dollar Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).

            The most recent incident happened in the port city of Karachi, where gunmen on a motorbike opened fire on a car carrying the Chinese men, which sent them to the hospital with serious bullet wounds, RFE/RL's Radio Mashaal reported.
            Two more Chinese workers shot at in Karachi couple of days ago. Two attacks in a month at opposite ends of the country.

            Pakistani Taliban turn on China | Lowy | May 04 2021

            This was either mistimed or a warning.....to the Chinese ambassador. Three months ago.

            A deadly bomb blast rocked the Serena Hotel last month in Pakistan’s south-western city of Quetta, leaving five dead and 12 critically injured. The bomb exploded just as a VIP guest and his entourage were barely five minutes away from the site. He was Nong Rong, Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to Pakistan, returning to the hotel after a dinner with local officials. Local media was quick to conclude that Beijing’s top diplomat in Pakistan had narrowly escaped an attack on his life.
            Last edited by Double Edge; 31 Jul 21,, 17:35.

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