Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WW2 Jet Age

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Imagine that R-7755 beast with turbos, intercoolers and all the other power additions that the final production engines got - probably a bomber engine for the likes of the B-36. I bet 7500 HP would have been pretty straight forward, maybe even 10,000 HP.
    sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by USSWisconsin View Post
      Imagine that R-7755 beast with turbos, intercoolers and all the other power additions that the final production engines got - probably a bomber engine for the likes of the B-36. I bet 7500 HP would have been pretty straight forward, maybe even 10,000 HP.
      By comparison, the Wasp Major for the B-36 could crank out "only" 4,300 HP
      My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over.

      Comment


      • #48
        To provide an example of jet engine vs piston engine power to weight ratios...

        One of the most highly refined piston engines ever, the PW R-4360 71.5 L 28-cylinder supercharged Radial engine:

        1.83 kW/kg 1.11 hp/lb


        Compared to a modern, high-bypass turbofan, the GE90-115B, Boeing 777 engine:

        10.0 kW/kg 6.10 hp/lb; equal to 112,000 hp.

        The gas turbine produces almost 6X as much power per unit weight, and does so with no reciprocating motion.

        When I was on the Boeing 777, I was in awe at the powerplant, in my case a Rolls-Royce Trent, equivalent to the GE engine. You could walk inside the engine casing; the fan blades were simply enormous. Here it is on a test pod on a B-747, compared to the normal 747 engine on the left.



        Large twin-engine aircraft like the 777 must by law be certified to fly at maximum gross weight on ONE engine. This means a fully-loaded 777 taking off for Japan could lose an engine on rotation, and still get into the air on the remaining engine. And it did so with authority. It peaked around 100,000 lb of thrust, equivalent to FOUR F-15 engines in full afterburn. Awesome technology.
        Attached Files

        Comment


        • #49
          This example makes it very clear why the jets replaced reciprocating engines. :)
          sigpic"If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
          If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Chogy View Post
            When I was on the Boeing 777, I was in awe at the powerplant, in my case a Rolls-Royce Trent, equivalent to the GE engine. You could walk inside the engine casing; the fan blades were simply enormous. Here it is on a test pod on a B-747, compared to the normal 747 engine on the left.
            The engine nacelle of the B777 has almost the same diameter as B737's fuselage...
            Attached Files
            Last edited by gunnut; 19 Sep 12,, 20:37.
            "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

            Comment

            Working...
            X