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What Could've Provoked A Soviet Invasion of West Germany?

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  • #46
    I'll give you two ways, drhuy. Nobody did a successful ABM to kill test until they did in 1961. And they began constructing a 16 site system in the same year.
    a successful test is too little to say anything, such system only lengthen the targets list.

    The Moscow ring was operational, drhuy, and still is today.
    still today, with 60s tech? i believe the rus put it in operational status just to make themselves feel a bit secure. Everybody knows for sure that nothing can stop a massive nuclear launch.

    I don't know what you're talking about, it's how both the Soviet Union and the United States did it, drhuy.

    Nuclear tipped ABMs were set up to defend Moscow and the ICBM silos in North Dakota.
    that's what i'm talking about. Using nuclear tip is nothing fancy or 'advanced' at all, like the worst shooter on earth try to blow a can 2m away with a grenade. It highlighted the limit of techonlogy back then. I would say using nuclear for defense is a desperate measure. Besides, like you said, both did it, then where was the 'edge' of the cccp? there was no reason for them to be so overconfident, wasnt it?

    Anyway, i feel that throughout the cold war, the american was successful in creating and maintaining a more balanced nuclear triad, wasnt they? The cccp nuke relied too much on the icbm.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by drhuy View Post
      :)) that's exactly why i'm surprised. If i (outsider) were the targeted audience, boasting would be understandable and desirable. you dont need to be a military expert to know that never to underestimate your enemy.
      The intended audience was Kruschev and if you want to keep your job, your write what he wants to hear.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Officer of Engineers View Post
        The intended audience was Kruschev and if you want to keep your job, your write what he wants to hear.
        well, like i said, their propaganda went so well that even fooled themselves.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by clackers View Post
          Yes, Kron, but drhuy was wondering why the nuclear tipped ABMs of the day weren't developed further ... the expensive research made it hard to justify in the 70s and 80s as amongst other reasons ICBMs grew multiple warheads and a new generation of medium missiles appeared which were harder to react to in time.
          I've read that fears that the detonations of the first few nuclear tipped ABMs would disrupt the targeting of the follow on ABMs made it hard for the concept of nuclear tipped ABMs to get a foothold.

          IIRC, the Sprint ABM which was supposed to intercept Soviet ABMs at only 100,000 feet (less than 20 miles up) had a huge 5 MEGATON enhanced radiation warhead.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by drhuy View Post
            a successful test is too little to say anything
            Tested, and built operational stations.

            Drhuy, if you do something before anybody else does, you're "advanced" in that area. Get it?

            Originally posted by drhuy View Post
            still today, with 60s tech?
            What are you talking about?

            It's been upgraded a couple of times. Who said it still had 60s computers, missiles and radar?

            Originally posted by drhuy View Post
            i believe the rus put it in operational status just to make themselves feel a bit secure. Everybody knows for sure that nothing can stop a massive nuclear launch.
            Are you forgetting that the US later implemented much the same thing in North Dakota?

            I hate to cover old ground again, but you've already been told that both sides researched and implemented ways of stopping ICBMs, but that it's a costly business, and since 1961 the equation of warheads vs their interceptors has altered so that both sides have mutually agreed to halt their implementations.

            However, the research continues, and despite you saying nothing can stop a massive nuclear launch, the governments continued to spend money. Reagan's Star Wars project received billions in funding in the 1980s, and the Soviets only gave up on their space SDI program in 1992.

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