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Cool stuff on the V2 Rocket Strikes in London

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  • Cool stuff on the V2 Rocket Strikes in London

    An interactive Google map of the V2 rocket strikes on London:

    V2 rockets on London - Google Maps

    A statistics paper that demonstrates the random pattern of strikes (providing evidence of the lack of guidance targeting):

    http://www.actuaries.org.uk/__data/a...26053/0481.pdf

    Some statistical presentations that apply the Poisson distribution to analyzing the V2 strikes:

    http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~zhukov/Spatial4.pdf
    http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~wgreene/...tributions.ppt

    Finally, some commentary on Londoners seeing patterns that didn't exist:

    See a Pattern on Wall Street? - TierneyLab Blog - NYTimes.com

    “People were certain that parts of the city had been targeted and other parts spared. People in those areas of the city seemingly spared came under suspicion as Nazi sympathizers, and their livelihoods and physical safety were threatened. And in those areas seemingly targeted by the bombs, people moved out, attempting to escape systematic bombing that was in fact not systematic.”
    "So little pains do the vulgar take in the investigation of truth, accepting readily the first story that comes to hand." Thucydides 1.20.3

  • #2
    interesting find, thanks

    on a somewhat related trivia, the V2 was the first manmade object to archive sub-orbital spaceflight during one of the trials.

    Comment


    • #3
      Proud of my Mum (and Dad)

      Hi there,

      My mother, now 81yrs lived in Chingford, Essex during the Blitz of London at this house -


      (hope the link works),

      then No 1 Queens Grove Road

      Although she does not like to remember or talk to much about her war years to often, she has told us quite a bit over the years.

      She spent nearly two years sleeping in the Anderson shelter in the garden with her Mum and two/three brothers/sisters. She used to watch the dog fights over London and overhead, cheering when “we” won and booing/crying when we lost. Saw a RAF pilot bail out, and then machine gunned on the way down, loads of crying and swearing that day!!!!
      The houses two doors along the street No 5 and 7 were hit by a direct hit from a stick that hit out houses on every other street through Chingford, she says she was terrified of the doodlebugs, especially when the droning stopped – she says every one would freeze and tuck there heads down (and probably clench there bottoms a bit), waiting for the explosion!!!!! Nobody needs that much excitement in one day.

      She has hundreds of stories and I have asked her to write them all down, but it makes her cry when she remembers in that way.

      Her brothers joined up at the beginning of the war. One left in 1940 as a young boy and fought in Egypt, Sicily, Italy, France, Belgium and a bit in Germany. He was demobbed in 1945 and my Mums family when to meet him and kings cross station, none of the family recognised him until her Dad spotted him in the crowd.
      He had been 4 yrs in the thick of battle with everyone around him and with many friends being killed, but without severe injury himself, he never talked about it until the day he died.

      Here are two accounts of people who live in Chingford just like my Mum.

      Oh!!! My father was in Palestine around 1940/43 and when into Normandy on D-day+3 – but that’s another story.

      BBC - WW2 People's War - A Child in London (Chingford / Poplar) during WW2

      BBC - WW2 People's War - Chingford Rocket

      Steve
      Last edited by penguinsfeet; 10 Mar 10,, 22:42. Reason: Try to get link to picture of house

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by penguinsfeet View Post
        Hi there,

        My mother, now 81yrs lived in Chingford, Essex during the Blitz of London at this house - Google Maps-

        (hope the link works),

        then No 1 Queens Grove Road

        Although she does not like to remember or talk to much about her war years to often, she has told us quite a bit over the years.

        She spent nearly two years sleeping in the Anderson shelter in the garden with her Mum and two/three brothers/sisters. She used to watch the dog fights over London and overhead, cheering when “we” won and booing/crying when we lost. Saw a RAF pilot bail out, and then machine gunned on the way down, loads of crying and swearing that day!!!!
        The houses two doors along the street No 5 and 7 were hit by a direct hit from a stick that hit out houses on every other street through Chingford, she says she was terrified of the doodlebugs, especially when the droning stopped – she says every one would freeze and tuck there heads down (and probably clench there bottoms a bit), waiting for the explosion!!!!! Nobody needs that much excitement in one day.

        She has hundreds of stories and I have asked her to write them all down, but it makes her cry when she remembers in that way.

        Her brothers joined up at the beginning of the war. One left in 1940 as a young boy and fought in Egypt, Sicily, Italy, France, Belgium and a bit in Germany. He was demobbed in 1945 and my Mums family when to meet him and kings cross station, none of the family recognised him until her Dad spotted him in the crowd.
        He had been 4 yrs in the thick of battle with everyone around him and with many friends being killed, but without severe injury himself, he never talked about it until the day he died.

        Here are two accounts of people who live in Chingford just like my Mum.

        Oh!!! My father was in Palestine around 1940/43 and when into Normandy on D-day+3 – but that’s another story.

        BBC - WW2 People's War - A Child in London (Chingford / Poplar) during WW2

        BBC - WW2 People's War - Chingford Rocket

        Steve
        Thank you for the personal stories. What does demobbed mean btw? Please also tell you Mom that people around the world would love to hear some of the stories.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cirrrocco View Post
          What does demobbed mean btw?.
          "Demobbed" is short for demobilized.
          "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

          Comment


          • #6
            I lived up Seven Sisters Way, there are still parts of London where you can see damage if you look hard.

            It's also a bit strange to see a row of old townhouses with a couple of 50's ones thrown in the middle. Doesn't take much imagination to figure out why that might be.


            One interesting thing I did find was an old Church tower along London Wall where you can still see parts of the old Roman wall. Anyway, a building had been put over the old church tower and during the blitz it was hit and blown off leaving the old tower intact. They didn't even know it was there.

            There is a little park under the Roman wall next to it, I loved going to sit and have a beer after skating. It was quiet and I was always left alone there. Skateboarding let me see far more of the city than most see, even a lot of Londoners didn't know about some of the stuff I would find in my wanderings.
            Originally posted by GVChamp
            College students are very, very, very dumb. But that's what you get when the government subsidizes children to sit in the middle of a corn field to drink alcohol and fuck.

            Comment

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