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  • Originally posted by vicdei View Post
    Ha,ha,you are a stupid fcuking liar!
    Ahem smegma drops , its spelt Fucking , a tad like Peking , and you squire are a racist commy gobshite who is probably in the process of getting expelled from primary school ,,toodle pip ol boy , enough of you .

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    • Originally posted by vicdei View Post
      Ha,ha,you are a stupid fcuking liar!
      No, you just bend over in the men's washroom for a living.

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      • I don't know...he amuses me.

        It's funny reading the rants of someone completely ignorant of history. His rantings require a

        "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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        • Well haripaka offered him up as a sacrificial chew toy , ya should have claimed him ? ;)

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          • Didn't know Hairy's trigger finger was that fast. Kiwis are usually so laid back...
            "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

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            • Nah....most Kiwis are laid back but HairyPaki is quick to the trigger.....

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              • Originally posted by Parihaka View Post
                Thanks for the video Pari, I never understood how cavalry could be advantageous against infantry but this video has depict quite a thrilling scene how things work with cavalry vs infantry.

                Sorry for the digress. Please conti........

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                • Wow what a thread. I'd forgotten what a total asshat Asim Aquil was.
                  Supporting or defending Donald Trump is such an unforgivable moral failing that it calls every bit of your judgement and character into question. Nothing about you should be trusted if you can look at this man and find redeemable value

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                  • Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
                    Wow what a thread. I'd forgotten what a total asshat Asim Aquil was.
                    yeah, it's worth a re-read isn't it. The beauty of the Asims of this world is the replies he gets.
                    In the realm of spirit, seek clarity; in the material world, seek utility.

                    Leibniz

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                    • The other thing this thread has reminded me of is how much we've lost: Gentlemen, a toast to absent friends.
                      In the realm of spirit, seek clarity; in the material world, seek utility.

                      Leibniz

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                      • Hear, Hear.

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                        • I never much cared for this sort of discussion. It's sort of like asking how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. It's all pure conjecture for most of us. I know my father, who started out his naval career in Shanghai in 1937, had USS Wasp torpedoed out from underneath him at Guadalcanal, survived the Battle Off Samar during the Leyte campaign, as well as the Kamikazes at both Iwo Jima and Okinawa, was pretty convinced that it was the right decision for the times, but I doubt he was ever all that sanguine about the reality of nuclear weapons.

                          I don't know how many here have any practical experience with nuclear weapons, but I personally had a belly full of it. My first 11 or 12 years in the navy, they were an every day concern for those of us assigned to USN combatants. See, everybody knows about ICBMs in our Trident boats, but most people have no clue about all of the so called "tactical nukes" that those of us in carriers, cruisers, destroyers and frigates carried. We had B61 air dropped bombs, B57 depth bombs, and Terrier BTN aboard the carrier in which I served, nuclear ASROC (which is also has a B57 as its warhead) and Terrier BTN in the cruiser, and nuclear ASROC in one of the frigates I rode. The fact that we could carry and deploy them was not classified, but their actual presence on board was something we could "neither confirm nor deny." OK, I'm confirming their presence during that era, and that was the main reason New Zealand politely asked us not to pay port calls down there.

                          After the collapse of the Soviet Union, all of those things went away almost immediately, and I for one was very happy to wave "Bye bye" to them as they were craned off the ship (the cruiser in this case). It was like the entire crew heaved a collective sigh of relief. No more surprise inspections and their potential for immediate career death if not worse. More to the point however was the immediate elimination of a potential source of escalation in a major theater war. See, at every war game ever played at the US Naval War College during the Cold War, not one every failed to go nuclear. The temptation to use them was just to great for either side.

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                          • Captain,

                            Couldn't agree with you more. Now some folks will perk up and say...AR, you were an Infantry officer....what the hell do you know about nukes?

                            Well those of us who served in USAREUR sometimes got tagged as an additional duty called ADM Platoon Leader. It was simple....a rifle platoon linked up with a special engineer squad equipped with ADMs. ( http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...tion_munitions ). And then you would get target folder, 2 man control and all the other fun stuff of folks who played with nukes. It also explains why as a 2nd Lieutenant I had a TS clearance.

                            There are still some major autobahn bridges in Germany and some mountain passes that I got to know very well from 1981 to 1984. Glad that ended.

                            In my mind ADMs were right up there with Davy Crocket's (the rocket launcher not the AAFES snack bar sandwich) as the Dumbest Things Infantrymen Played With...
                            “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                            Mark Twain

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                            • Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                              Captain,

                              Couldn't agree with you more. Now some folks will perk up and say...AR, you were an Infantry officer....what the hell do you know about nukes?

                              Well those of us who served in USAREUR sometimes got tagged as an additional duty called ADM Platoon Leader. It was simple....a rifle platoon linked up with a special engineer squad equipped with ADMs. ( http://http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...tion_munitions ). And then you would get target folder, 2 man control and all the other fun stuff of folks who played with nukes. It also explains why as a 2nd Lieutenant I had a TS clearance.

                              There are still some major autobahn bridges in Germany and some mountain passes that I got to know very well from 1981 to 1984. Glad that ended.

                              In my mind ADMs were right up there with Davy Crocket's (the rocket launcher not the AAFES snack bar sandwich) as the Dumbest Things Infantrymen Played With...
                              Ditto me as an Ensign. In my first six months in Constellation I was an Assistant Communications Officer, and got cleared TS and was handed the keys. I know you know this stuff, but I would love to see the faces of civilians watching us execute the two-man rule. What that means folks is that two people, generally officers or very senior enlisted, each place their hands on the keying material that grant access to the SIOP (pronounced "cy-op"), or "Single Integrated Operations Plan. The SIOP contained the so called "notional numbers" otherwise known as launch boxes, fail safe points, etc., as well as the target sets that ALL military units were supposed to achieve in order to execute Armageddon. You walk, literally hand in hand with that material between you and bring it to the CO and XO and then watch the fun begin. It's bad enough to have think about actually having to do it for real, but then you get those wonderful "emergency action messages" (EAM) exercise Red Rockets that you have to answer within five minutes, etc. Pain in the ass!!! And all of those other little ancillary things attendant to being in the Personnel Reliability Program (PRP); like if you have your wisdom teeth pulled and they have to put you under a general anesthetic, you had to be debriefed. Even bigger pain in the ass!!!!!!

                              Actually this scene, despite it being a comedy, and the producers not receiving any assistance from the DoD for obvious reasons nonetheless came VERY close to describing the actual process. Whoever their technical adviser was had been a player at some point.



                              BTW, anyone notice that they are so engrossed in the EAM that no one is actually flying the airplane? My favorite part of the scene.

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                              • Captain, the best part was the survival kit inventory.

                                Jeez, I hated all that crap....a cavity search would have been more welcome!!!
                                “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                                Mark Twain

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