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So How Many Battlefields Have you Visited

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  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Last Thursday I was finishing up a week at FT Campbell, KY, and got an afternoon off ti head to Nashville. I dropped about 25 miles south to the town of Franklin. I last visited the Franklin Battlefield in 1999. Franklin was the middle battle of the NOV-DEC 64 Nashville Campaign and featured on of the greatest blood lettings of the war...especially surprising considering how late it was fought. 20,000 Confederates would line up...100 regiments...and march across 2 miles of open ground to attack the entrenched Union Army of Ohio. It was a charge almost twice the size of the famed Pickett's Charge.

    The Confederates would suffer almost 6300 casualties. 55 regimental commanders would fall and 14 Confederate generals were casualties (6 dead/7 wounded/1 captured). The 6 Confederate generals would be laid out dead on the porch of the Carnton Plantation manor house, to include Patrick Cleburne.

    When I visited the previous time it was very difficult to follow because there was almost no interpretation and much of the battlefield had been overrun by development.

    Well the visit this time was a real joy. I must tip my hat to Save The Franklin Battlefield, Inc, the Civil War Trust & State of Tennessee. Together they have recovered almost 180 acres of land and removed the buildings, to include a pizza parlor, a mini mall and a gas station and restored the ground to as it was at the time of battle at the key points of the battle. The parts of the battlefield which did take place in an urban setting, primarily at the Carter House and Cotton Gin, the area has been restored and interpretation is superior. And the SFTB have developed a great 13 stop auto tour of the battlefield which includes the ability to scan QR tags which bring up short films on your smart phones and great interpretation markers at each stand.

    If you are interested in more, check out these sites.

    http://www.franklin-stfb.org/index.htm

    http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields...ttlefield.html

    It's always good to see success in restoring our heritage!

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Originally posted by Shek View Post
    Buck, can I include Grafenwoehr, Hohenfels, Polk and Krasnovia (Irwin)?
    Shek,

    They would be at the top of any list!!!

    I did forget to add those to my list as well!

    And I have not been to Carlisle! Need to fix that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Buck, can I include Grafenwoehr, Hohenfels, Polk and Krasnovia (Irwin)?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shek
    replied
    Not quite the impressive list of AR, but here's where I've been. I visited four of these as a kid, only returning thus far to Gettysburg.

    Antietam
    Appomattox Court House
    Carlisle
    Chattanooga (kid)
    Chicamaugua (kid)
    City Point
    Cold Harbor
    Five Forks
    Gettysburg (kid)
    Harper’s Ferry
    Lookout Mountain (kid)
    New Market
    North Anna
    Petersburg
    Richmond
    South Mountain
    Spotsylvania
    The Crater
    Wilderness

    Normandy

    Leave a comment:


  • Bigfella
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Big Fella,

    I am very envious of that list!

    Some day!

    I'll do my other war list later but I was lucky to get to Gallipoli care of the Turkish Army!

    I consider that my biggest coup.
    Thanks AR. I am similarly envious of your list. I still have to do some digging. As a kid we drove around eastern France/Low Countries/Western Germany, so there are bound to be a few more in there. There are also more in Vietnam & possibly Cambodia. I have probably missed out a ton in Ethiopia. Much like the Balkans, it has been warred over for millennia, and often in the same places. I realised afterward that there has been at least one more battle at Harar - Menelik II (the guy who beat the Italians) beating the local Sheik to incorporate the place into Ethiopia proper.

    Some Australia ones:

    Eureka Stockade
    Williamstown Fort, Melbourne: (not technically a battle, but the gun there reputedly fired the first shot for the British Commonwealth in both world wars. Same gunner. In WW1 it was a warning shot over the bow of German ship exiting Port Phillip Bay. In WW2 it was the same thing, but he got the nationality wrong )

    Leave a comment:


  • Doktor
    replied
    Bleh, we have a battlefield on every corner

    On a more serious side, been on Galipole, lots of sites in Turkey, Normandy battlefields (Le Havre to Pontaubault tour), Somme, and a lot of places in Italy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Big Fella,

    I am very envious of that list!

    Some day!

    I'll do my other war list later but I was lucky to get to Gallipoli care of the Turkish Army!

    I consider that my biggest coup.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bigfella
    replied
    I'll need to do a bit of research on my travels to find out what battles have happened at places I've visited (I started at 10 ), but here is a short list:


    WW1
    Verdun

    WW2

    Europe

    Bastogne
    Aachen

    East Asia

    Singapore
    Khota Bahru
    Johor
    Slim River


    East Africa

    Gondar (also Madhist War 1881-1899)
    Amba Alagi (also Italian Invasion 1895 & Woyane Rebellion 1943)
    Battle of the Lakes

    Assorted Ethiopian Battlefields

    Lake Ashenge (Ethiopian-Adal War/Portugese-Ottoman War 1542 & Second Italo-Ethiopian War1935)
    Adwa (First Italo-Ethiopian War 1896)
    Harar (Ogaden War 1977-78)
    Dire Dawa (Ogaden War 1977-78)
    Maychew (Second Italo-Ethiopian War)

    Ethiopian Civil War

    Bahir Dar
    Shire (also Second Italo-Ethiopian War)

    Indochina

    Hue (Second Indochina War)
    Saigon (Second Indochina War)
    Cu Chi Tunnels (Second Indochina War)
    Phnom Pehn (Cambodian Civil War)

    USA

    Manhattan (Revolutionary War)
    Washington DC (ACW)

    Stonewall (Battle for Gay Rights)

    Leave a comment:


  • tbm3fan
    replied
    Wow. I left the East Coast in 1966 when 12. So the only place where I have been back east was Gettysburg to camp with the Boy Scouts. Outside the US I have been to Normandy, Bastogne, Leyte, Corregidor, Bataan and the old walled city inside Manila

    Leave a comment:


  • Stitch
    replied
    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    My old boss used to say I could sniff out 2 things in a new area better than anyone he knew....a battlefield and a cold beer.
    And not necessarily in that order!

    Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    Most have been by appointment. My best friend is actually more of a history fanatic than I am so we have had a lot of trips together. He hasn't been to Antietam or Gettysburg for 22 years so next month we are doing a 4 day trip to do an in depth study of the campaigns....to include the retreat from Gettysburg which most overlook. And we are throwing in Monocacy for good measure.
    Nice! I'd LOVE to tag along, but I'm stuck out here on the West Coast for the forseeable future (at least until my kids are off to college next decade). I toured the East Coast when I was MUCH younger (back in my teens), and I barely had an appreciation for Colonial history, let alone the ACW.

    I'm assuming you're talking about the Confederate retreat back to Virginia between July 4th & the 15th? As I'm sure you know, there was quite a bit of criticism directed at Meade (particularly from Lincoln) about his "lackadaisical" pursuit of the Confederate forces after Gettysburg. IIRC, the only two units that were in any kind of shape to undertake a pursuit of the Confederate forces were the 5th Corps & Crawford's Pennsylvania Reserves from the 6th Corps, but Meade was unwilling to commit his few remaining effective forces to the pursuit of a possibly cornered (and still potentially dangerous) enemy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Don, There is a reason that I asked for FT Lee VA for my terminal assignment!

    And Joe....2 good ones which are on my To Do list.

    Leave a comment:


  • TopHatter
    replied
    For the ACW, just a couple

    Battle of Fort Pillow Mostly because my father was born just a few miles away

    and this one because I was at the Naval Aviation Museum up the road Fort Barrancas

    Leave a comment:


  • DonBelt
    replied
    That's ground zero for Civil War battlefields. I always liked history, but I was young when I was in the service and my priorities tended to be chasing girls and drinking beer, not necessarily in that order. I'd like to get my kids down there though to see the area and the Civil War battlefields. Maybe Busch Gardens too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Albany Rifles
    replied
    Been at this since I was 19....and I am now WELL into my 50s!

    It helps that I work in Petersburg, VA and live just toits southeast. Heck, I drive through 2 battlesites to get to work...haven't seen The Crater since yesterday! My son went to elementary school 400 yards from the cattle pens which were raided in the Beefsteak Raid.

    Did a LOT of business travel for about 15 years (1993 - 2008) which took me to locations near a lot of these places so it was just a matter of side diversions in evenings or taking a later flight over an early AM flight. My old boss used to say I could sniff out 2 things in a new area better than anyone he knew....a battlefield and a cold beer.


    Most have been by appointment. My best friend is actually more of a history fanatic than I am so we have had a lot of trips together. He hasn't been to Antietam or Gettysburg for 22 years so next month we are doing a 4 day trip to do an in depth study of the campaigns....to include the retreat from Gettysburg which most overlook. And we are throwing in Monocacy for good measure.

    My

    Leave a comment:


  • Stitch
    replied
    Wow! That is SOME list, AR! I wish I had been to even HALF of those battlefields!

    To be honest, I was never very interested in the ACW, until I read Allen C. Guelzo's recent offering, Gettysburg: The Last Invasion; it really opened my eyes concerning the ACW, and now I can't get enough. I finished Winston Groom's Shiloh 1862: The First Great And Terrible Battle of The Civil War last week, and now I'm deep into Shelby Foote's The Civil War, A Narrative: Red River to Appomattox.

    Next up: Brooks D. Simpson's recent biography on Grant, Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865. After that, probably Sherman: A Soldier's Life, by Lee Kennett.

    Leave a comment:

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