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American Civil War Quiz

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  • #16
    Originally posted by TopHatter View Post
    I would say CSS Alabama, except she wasn't a blockade runner (nor a privateer, for that matter).
    Is that the same ironclad known as the Merrimack north of the border?
    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

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    • #17
      Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,

      In July 1861, a contract was signed with shipbuilders Laird Brothers, for vessel number 290, known as Enrica. On 29 July 1862 Enrica went to sea supposedly for trials with various dignitaries on board. After putting them off by a tug she quietly sailed off for the Azores to take on armaments and ammunition and begin life as the blockade-runner CSS Alabama.
      from the Merseyside Maritime Museum's website: Liverpool museums - The history of CSS Alabama

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Tech View Post
        Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,



        from the Merseyside Maritime Museum's website: Liverpool museums - The history of CSS Alabama
        Blockade runners try to get cargo in or out, the Alabama was a commerce raider. She didn't take many prizes she sank shipping for the most part.

        Upon the completion of her seven expeditionary raids, Alabama had been at sea for 534 days out of 657, never visiting a single Confederate port. She boarded nearly 450 vessels, captured or burned 65 Union merchant ships, and took more than 2,000 prisoners without a single loss of life from either prisoners or her own crew.

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        • #19
          Well, suck. I'm sorry. Guess I'll have to fire some of my online resources that I have saved and try to regain some of my dignity.

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          • #20
            Tech,

            And to rub salt in the wounds, here is another Confederate ship which never entered a Confederate port, the CSS Shenandoah

            CSS Shenandoah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

            As for blockade runners, they were merchant ships, and almost all were manned by British crews with RN officers.
            “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
            Mark Twain

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Stitch View Post
              Is that the same ironclad known as the Merrimack north of the border?
              No, you're thinking of CSS Virginia

              Originally posted by Tech View Post
              Really? The C.S.S. Alabama was the one I meant. I can't remember the title of the trivia book I used to have (it walked when I loaned it to a fellow student) but I remember reading about the Alabama being a blockade runner. And I found this online,
              Even scholarly sources get their nomenclature screwed up, which is depressing.

              This has already been gone into, but I'm in mood to quote some Wiki

              Blockade Runner - A blockade runner is a term applied to ships used to evade a naval blockade of a harbor or strait, as opposed to confronting the blockaders to break the blockade. Very often blockade running is done in order to transport cargo, for example to bring food or arms to a blockaded city. In other cases the blockade running is an attempt to communicate with the outside world.

              Privateer - A private vessel authorized by a country's government by letters of marque to attack foreign shipping in exchange for prize money.

              Merchant Raider - A commissioned naval vessel that seeks out and captures or destroys enemy commerce.

              CSS Alabama was not a privateer, though she's often described as such. She was a commissioned vessel of the Confederate States Navy, hence the "CSS" prefix.

              Interestingly, she was crewed almost solely by Britons, as well as a couple of her officers. The captain and other officers were the only Confederate naval officers aboard.
              “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
              ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

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              • #22
                Here's a really easy one :)

                Name the small arm:

                This unusual Civil War-era pistol was also known as the "Grape Shot Revolver"
                “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

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                • #23
                  The LeMat.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Bluesman View Post
                    The LeMat.
                    Yep, an especially easy one for the likes of you! :))

                    And it's your question, fire away!
                    “Never let yourself be persuaded that any one Great Man, any one leader, is necessary to the salvation of America. When America consists of one leader and 158 million followers, it will no longer be America.”
                    ― Dwight D. Eisenhower

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                    • #25
                      "Poinsett's Tactics" was the cavalry drill manual at the start of the war. A prominent US Cavalry officer wrote a manual to supercede that one, but it was not adopted.

                      However, that officer was noted for two other points. Who was he, what was he known as, and who was his famous family member?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Bluesman View Post
                        "Poinsett's Tactics" was the cavalry drill manual at the start of the war. A prominent US Cavalry officer wrote a manual to supercede that one, but it was not adopted.

                        However, that officer was noted for two other points. Who was he, what was he known as, and who was his famous family member?
                        Phillip StGeorge Cooke the "Father of the US Cavalry",who's daughter Flora was married to James Ewell Brown Stuart.

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                        • #27
                          Nailed it.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Bluesman View Post
                            Nailed it.
                            This widow of a ACW general was headmistress of a Ladies preparatory school.
                            This school had among its students the Woman who founded the US's most popular organization for girls.
                            This school also had as a student one of the most famous of the writers during the "Golden Age of Sci FI"

                            Name the School,the Headmistress, the organization, and the writer.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ghost88 View Post
                              This widow of a ACW general was headmistress of a Ladies preparatory school.
                              This school had among its students the Woman who founded the US's most popular organization for girls.
                              This school also had as a student one of the most famous of the writers during the "Golden Age of Sci FI"

                              Name the School,the Headmistress, the organization, and the writer.
                              Virginia Female Institute (now the Stuart Hall School) is the school
                              Flora Cooke Stuart, JEB Stuart's widow is the Headmistress
                              Girl Scouts of America founder Julliette Gordon Low
                              Anne McCaffrey is the writer


                              (Geeez....I know too much useless crap! Sign of a misspent youth!)
                              Last edited by Albany Rifles; 08 Dec 09,, 22:19.
                              “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
                              Mark Twain

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Albany Rifles View Post
                                Virginia Female Institute (now the Stuart Hall School) is the school
                                Flora Cooke Stuart, JEB Stuart's widow is the Headmistress
                                Girl Scouts of America founder Julliette Gordon Low
                                Anne McCaffrey is the writer


                                (Geeez....I know too much useless crap! Sign of a misspent youth!)
                                Okay smarty what was the.....

                                u-turn

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