Page 69 of 69 FirstFirst ... 60616263646566676869
Results 1,021 to 1,030 of 1030

Thread: What Book Are You Reading?

  1. #1021
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Aug 03
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    11,966
    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    Next up, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams. While I've seen the 2005 film starring Martin Freeman, this is my first time having read the book.
    An entertaining book, humorous light reading. Finished it in a couple of days. The book starts with Arthur Dent having breakfast at his home when he notices a work crew outside his house with bulldozers intending to demolish his house to make way for a highway bypass. Meanwhile a Vogon fleet is approaching Earth to demolish the planet to make way for an interstellar bypass, and Arthur and his friend Ford Prefect, who turns out to be an alien pretending to be a human, hitch a ride onto a Vogon ship just before the Earth is destroyed, and that's where their strange, absurd adventure begins.

    The 2005 film is a very faithful adaptation of the book.

    Back to Time Enough for Love by Heinlein.
    Last edited by Ironduke; 27 Aug 18, at 18:02.
    "Every man has his weakness. Mine was always just cigarettes."

  2. #1022
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    5,304
    Got a short bio of Charles Xll (of Sweden) called Charles Xll and the collapse of the Swedish Empire by R Nisbet Bain. The Great Northern War is largely a blank in my historical knowledge so I have started my education with the great Swedish King who actually lost the war.

  3. #1023
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    5,304
    Got a copy of Anna Politkovskaya's 'Putin's Russia' on Monday... Shame it seems to be happening in the US too.

  4. #1024
    Administrator
    Lei Feng Protege
    Defense Professional
    Join Date
    23 Aug 05
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    13,850
    just finished CJ Chiver's The Fighters.

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighters-C-J-.../dp/1451676646

    gripping account of small-unit action in Iraq/Afghanistan with a focus on the war-fighter, whether it's grunt, pilot, medic, etc...as well as the costs afterwards. painful at times, impressively researched per usual.
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

  5. #1025
    Global Moderator
    Military Professional
    Defense Professional
    Albany Rifles's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Apr 07
    Location
    Prince George, VA
    Posts
    8,876
    Quote Originally Posted by astralis View Post
    just finished CJ Chiver's The Fighters.

    https://www.amazon.com/Fighters-C-J-.../dp/1451676646

    gripping account of small-unit action in Iraq/Afghanistan with a focus on the war-fighter, whether it's grunt, pilot, medic, etc...as well as the costs afterwards. painful at times, impressively researched per usual.
    Looking forward to reading it.
    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

  6. #1026
    Administrator
    Lei Feng Protege
    Defense Professional
    Join Date
    23 Aug 05
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    13,850
    moving to Anne Applebaum's Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine.

    https://www.amazon.com/Red-Famine-St.../dp/0385538855

    she wryly says in the prologue that when she first started research for the tome in 2010, she figured it would be a non-controversial historical piece of interest to regional specialists. then the Ukrainian revolution happened...
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

  7. #1027
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    5,304
    Excellent book about the Holodomor. I finished Anna Politkovskaya's "Putin's Russia" and now understand why her murder was such a loss. It is not a book as such but a series of vignettes, a bit like the BBC World Services 'From Our Own Correspondent' type stories but at the same time almost Solzhenitsyn - esque in futility. Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago actually made me cry with laughter and Politkovskaya nearly did so too. At the same time the tragedies are almost Euripides level... The absurdities and contradictions are... well if you do not laugh you must cry, but so manifestly absurd you have to laugh. "This could never happen here" may go through your mind... or "I'm safe."

    She recounts the stories of individuals; a soldier lost in the Second Chechen War and his Mothers search for how he perished, an old neighbour of hers, Tanya, who became rich, a mini tragedy love story of Lena and Renat, tales of Urals gangster and how he arose. She charts the lives of people and merely reflects what that says about the 'authorities' which in most cases are complicit in the crimes that tragedies revolve around.

    She tells a riveting story and it's certainly the best book I have read this year. I advise it for anyone who wants to introduction to what Muscovy has become under Putin.

  8. #1028
    New Member
    Join Date
    22 Jan 19
    Posts
    1
    Who has read 'One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich' by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn here?

  9. #1029
    New Member
    Join Date
    12 Aug 16
    Posts
    1
    WulfsSchädel and other poems, by Bill Noble. Poetry composed by a political dissident.

  10. #1030
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    5,304
    Quote Originally Posted by Layman Patient View Post
    Who has read 'One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich' by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn here?
    I have, why? Not as good as the Magnum Opus of Gulag Archipelago in my view.

    Since I am currently on holiday (maternity leave) am currently reading Marquis de Custine's "Empire of the Czar" which is the observations of a French aristocrat of the Muscovite Empire from 1839/40. It is a travelogue almost but has a foreword by Kennan (of 'Long Telegram' fame) perhaps because it states some abiding truths we must face about the Muscovite character. I quote: "In Russia to converse is to conspire, to think is to revolt; thought is merely a crime, it is a misfortune also."

    In the first part of the Marquis journey he has a long declamation by a 'Prince K-' which in some ways blames the Muscovite proclivity to despotism to 'Byzantiumism'' though 'Prince K-' also proclaims the Tsars "the worthy successors of Bati [sic)" (meaning the Mongol general we know as Batu). If I had time I would write the whole statement of this Prince K- for it very telling of the Muscovite psyche and world view which seems not have changed a whit since.

    It troubles me though as essentially a 'Bukovsky-ian' believing that the Muscovite people are not my enemy but the Chekist mafiosi who oppress them are both my enemy and theirs. Could this analysis be incorrect? I reject the 'Byzantiumism' idea, though I can see it plays a role, as Ukraine is 80%+ Orthodox also and while it has certainly been important to Ukrainians that they have established their own Orthodox Church nobody thinks this makes the President special. It does not imbue him with Heavenly guidance but in Moscow Putin is literally worshiped in some places, icons are made of him etc... 'Prince K-' says

    "You must not believe, for example, that the persecutions in Poland were the effect of personal resentment of the Emperor; they were the result of a profound and deliberate calculation. These acts of cruelty are meritorious in the eyes of true believers; it is the Holy Spirit who so enlightens the sovereign as to elevate him above all human feelings; and it is God who blesses him as the executor of his high designs. By this manner of viewing things, judges and executioners become so much the greater saints as they are greater barbarians."

    I cannot myself believe in 'eternal natures of a people' of this sort, though I am prime example of the Polish proclivity to rebellion, and must reject the 'Byzantine' cause for the proclivity to autocracy by the Ukrainian comparison so it deeply worries me that there may almost some 'hereditary' addiction. As a free Polish Ukrainian I cannot believe they are so different from me - indeed those who are my distant family with whom I been reunited seem perfectly similar to others of family. For myself I retain hope for the liberty of the peoples of the Muscovite Empire.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. gays.. good or bad?
    By AreYouCereal in forum World Affairs Board Pub
    Replies: 237
    Last Post: 29 Oct 07,, 01:02
  2. interesting facts
    By omon in forum International Politics
    Replies: 95
    Last Post: 14 Jan 07,, 05:38
  3. Evidences about Ayodhya doubtful
    By Asim Aquil in forum International Politics
    Replies: 102
    Last Post: 11 Jul 06,, 18:41

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •