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Thread: Pashtun Tahafuz Movement

  1. #1
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Pashtun Tahafuz Movement

    Pakistan MPs-led group attacks army check post; 3 killed, 15 injured

    This topic needs to be tracked. Elected MPs now attack Pak army posts.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Propaganda reaching borderline con artistry

    Take a good look at Imran Jan. And now tell me which animal re resembles. Yeah, you all are right.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    Propaganda reaching borderline con artistry

    Take a good look at Imran Jan. And now tell me which animal re resembles. Yeah, you all are right.
    I was thinking of an ibex, a species of wild mountain goat. Males of which are commonly larger and heaver than female ?

    The BBC published a report titled “Uncovering Pakistan’s secret human rights abuses”. It makes the case for Pakistan Army’s alleged role in killing innocent civilians in Pakistan’s tribal areas, in cahoots with the Taliban.
    Hot button topic if anyone inside pakistan were to repeat

    Uncovering Pakistan's secret human rights abuses | BBC | Jun 02 2019

    Outsiders, including journalists, cannot get in - so verifying claims from the security forces is extremely difficult. Those who have reported stories from Waziristan that don't reflect well on the military have found themselves punished.
    I found the author interesting. Naturally our friends at def.pk disagree
    Last edited by Double Edge; 21 Jun 19, at 09:46.

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    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    I found the author interesting. Naturally our friends at def.pk disagree
    Go there and ask them who won the 1971 way.

    Let me break down the probability for you:
    atleast 5% abduls would say they won,
    80% abduls would narrate the usual ISI scripted line which we have heard in WAB already,
    remaining 15% would talk about Indian toilets, rape, AIDS in India and what not.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  5. #5
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    One by Francesca

    Waziristan : Staring at the sun | ANI News | Jun 24 2019

    More or less at the same time, a Human Rights Commission of Pakistan's fact-finding team that was trying to reach the area to investigate on what is now know as 'Khar Qamar massacre' has been stopped by the Army who imposed the curfew on the whole area. Again, we shall say, because since May 26 Waziristan has been under curfew almost all the time. The facts are well known, everywhere except in Pakistan of course, because the local press has been ordered not to give voice or space to Pashtun Tahaffuz Movement PTM or any related episode and protest. The coverage has been limited to the official version of the story: according to the Army, in fact, there's been a battle between them and supporters who opened fire at a checkpoint.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 25 Jun 19, at 12:34.

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    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Crime & punishment

    TORTURE by law-enforcement agencies is so endemic it is often accepted as ‘police culture’. We only have to look at the overwhelming news reports and academic research for proof. And the reason it is so endemic is that there is little to no penalty or accountability against LEAs, and hence no effort to change this culture.

    Today is International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. But Pakistani victims have little hope of receiving any form of support from the judiciary, executive or legislation.

    The case of Sajid Masih is a telling — and appalling — example of broken governance. Sajid’s cousin was accused of blasphemy, due to which he was also roped in. They were both arrested and interrogated by FIA officials, during which they were reportedly beaten and abused. By his account, Sajid was allegedly ordered to rape his cousin. He refused. The officials shouted at him to do as he was told. He couldn’t, and jumped out of a fourth-floor window to escape the humiliation. The fall could have killed him. But he survived, albeit with multiple injuries, to tell his harrowing story.

    Stories such as these often go unnoticed. But it is when local and international press, along with human rights defenders, take up the matter that authorities are forced to respond. Following the outcry, a government official promises an inquiry. Similarly, in Sajid’s case, a senior FIA official stated, “An inquiry has been initiated against four officials. If found guilty, punitive actions will be taken against them.” And then, in a bizarre move, the FIA also filed a case of attempted suicide — a crime in Pakistan — against Sajid. Ludicrous.

    It is important to remember that the investigation by LEAs is the first step in the criminal justice system. When this first step is ridden with abuse, it sets up a case for a faulty investigation — resulting in a faulty trial and subsequent faulty sentence and appeals.

    Under Pakistani law, there is no specific offence that criminalises torture. Instead, a cocktail of different sections in the Pakistan Penal Code is used. Section 166 (“Public servant disobeying law, with intent to cause injury to any person”) can be employed, but the provision has rarely been used or enforced. Generally, a mixture of offences that constitute ‘hurt’ is used depending on the type of injuries inflicted. It is also an offence under Section 156 of the Police Order, 2002, but is not enforceable throughout the country. The lack of a specific offence, however, is not the only problem.

    To enforce these provisions, it is the Code of Criminal Procedure that is applicable for investigation, trial and other procedural aspects. The main dilemma with this is that reporting and investigating torture is also done by the police, which cannot guarantee an independent and unbiased mechanism. Under the CrPC, if the police refuse to lodge an FIR, the victim can address the matter before a justice of the peace. However, the justice of the peace can only order the police to register an FIR, and it will still be the police who investigate the case. This is problematic as it exposes victims to further harassment, abuse and torture.

    Pursuing litigation is expensive and time consuming for victims. And given the adversarial system followed in Pakistan, the court environment is often a cause for stress and further complications. These problems would not arise if a separate legislation criminalising torture is enforced, as these costs and problems would then be borne by the state, not the victim. Sajid’s parents did not have the means or influence to lodge a complaint against the FIA.

    The offences of ‘hurt’ have been proven to be problematic as they are compoundable offences, allowing for the matter to be resolved through a compromise — without criminal accountability. Even when victims are successful in lodging an FIR against police officials, most people from marginalised and impoverished backgrounds cannot stand the pressure from a public official and give in to a compromise.

    An enforceable law criminalising torture is the need of the hour. Political will, though sporadic, is also there. Three bills on the matter have been tabled by the PML-N’s Maiza Hameed and the PPP’s Farhatullah Babar and Farooq Naek. All of them have lapsed. Recently, Dr Shireen Mazari and Bilawal Bhutto-Zardari have also publicly stated they will table bills to criminalise torture, but it has yet to transpire. The reason is unknown and inexcusable.

    The only way of moving the criminal justice system of Pakistan forward is by criminalising torture, which can only be done through a special law. This special law will need to take stock of the current problems so as to ensure that others like Sajid do not have to suffer similar fates.

    By failing to criminalise torture, we are affirming the flawed system as sacred.

    The writer is a criminal lawyer and advocacy technical coordinator of Justice Project Pakistan.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

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    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Why Was Afghan President Ashraf Ghani Compelled To Visit Pakistan?

    No special driver for the Afghan President Ashraf Ghani. Upon arrival in Islamabad for a two-day visit, he was welcomed by Abdul Razak Dawood, Advisor for Commerce, Textile, Industry and Production, and Investment of Pakistan. Afghanistan President Ashraf Ghani arrived in Islamabad, for the first time since 2015, on the invitation of Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan, on 27 June.
    The Pakistan PMO issued a statement post-meeting: “The meeting has been the usual success for Pakistan and Pakistani diplomacy, and the two leaders agreed to “open a new chapter of friendship and cooperation between Pakistan and Afghanistan, based on mutual trust and harmony for the benefit of the two peoples and countries and for advancing the cause of peace, stability and prosperity in the region”.
    Imran Khan reiterated that Pakistan supports an Afghan-led peace process, and promotes an intra-Afghan dialogue. Nothing new here. Pakistan Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi, said in his statement, that President Ghani “praised Pakistan’s role in the peace process”. This appears to be slightly stretched; a little bit of an exaggeration.

    “Pakistan Wants Govt In Kabul That Can Be Controlled By Islamabad & Rawalpindi”
    According to a number of local experts, Ghani was compelled to go to Pakistan, in a bid to garner support for talks between his government and the Taliban, since the current talks in Qatar are between the US and Pakistan-based Taliban, who still refuse to include the Afghan government in the meetings.
    President Ghani, last January, had accused Pakistan of meddling in the internal politics of Afghanistan, saying that the key(s) to the war were in Islamabad and Rawalpindi, where Pakistan’s government and military are based, and in Quetta, the hideout of a key group of Taliban leaders. He was and is right, but apparently things are getting out of control.

    According to a Pakistani analyst who prefers to remain anonymous, the so-called ‘Lahore Process’, a meeting organised a few days ago in Pakistan’s Bhurban town near Murree city, is an “ISI and Army job”, to bring together a number of Pakistan-sponsored members of the Afghan political scene, starting with war criminals like Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, and encircling Ghani and his people to put pressure on them.

    The same analyst claims that Pakistan wants (despite official statements), a “peace process” that will install a government in Kabul – a government that can be easily controlled and manipulated by Islamabad and Rawalpindi.

    Accusations Levelled Against Pakistan Army By PTM Activists
    Mohammed Umer Daudzai, one of Ghani’s advisors, declared a week ago, while in Delhi on an official visit: “We see that the relationship between Pakistan and the Taliban has remained intact. We have told the US that they should include the clarification of the Taliban’s relationship with Pakistan in its discussions”. But the relationship, out of the official channels and diplomatic declarations, is quite clear.

    Eyewitnesses and sources based in Waziristan say that the Army keeps the border open for members of the Taliban and the Haqqani Network.

    The Pashtun Tahafuz Movement (PTM), fighting for the rights of the Pashtuns, has been accusing the Pakistan Army of using border regions as: a) training camps and nurseries for/jihad;/b) as battlefields for war-like actions against the ‘bad’ Taliban; c) as safe havens for the ‘good’ Taliban; d) and as factories for fake documents in order to send ISI spies to Afghanistan.
    And, according to PTM activists, nothing has changed despite the repeated denials of the Pakistani officials. “They cross the border at Ghulam Khan,” says an eyewitness.

    ‘Truth’ About Ghani’s Visit to Pak Likely To Emerge After Talks In Doha
    The same eyewitness also said: “The Pakistan Army still runs a camp in the hills between Bannu district and Waziristan. The ‘good’ Taliban are still recruiting young people, still harbouring terrorists coming from other parts of Pakistan, and helping them cross the border with Afghanistan when they need to. They all work under the patronage of the Army.”

    Then he added: “In Khaisor village, North Waziristan Commander Gohar Wazir of the Haqqani Network is still active with his group, while Commander Ishaaq of the Haqqani Network for Jani Kheil area, is roaming freely along with his Taliban under the patronage of the Pakistani Army.”

    He went on to say, “Khair Noor, who is the Commander of the Hafiz Gulbahdar group in Miran Shah (Asad Kheil), is getting direct military assistance from the Miran Shah military camp.”

    And of course, it is very well known that Mullah Baradar and his Taliban team travelled to Qatar through and from Pakistan for talks with the US envoy Zalmay Khalilzad.

    On 29 June, a new round of talks between the US and the Taliban will begin in Doha. The truth about Ghani’s visit to Pakistan is more likely to come from there.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  8. #8
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    The same analyst claims that Pakistan wants (despite official statements), a “peace process” that will install a government in Kabul – a government that can be easily controlled and manipulated by Islamabad and Rawalpindi.
    Yeah, this is what the Paks want, whether they get it is still an open question : )

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