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Thread: What's wrong with Hong Kong (and how to fix it)

  1. #46
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    This is next gen



    The 2nd protest march got 2 million

  2. #47
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Then there is this guy


  3. #48
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Hong Kong: Protesters breach government building on handover anniversary

    Dozens of demonstrators broke through the glass of the Legislative Council (LegCo) building, while a large crowd observed the unrest from outside.

    Hundreds then entered the building, spray-painting messages on the walls and occupying the central legislative chamber.

    The unrest is a breakaway part of a peaceful protest involving thousands.

    Earlier, police held signs warning they would use force if protesters charged the glass exterior walls. They later warned that anyone who breached an internal metal gate would be arrested.

    But on each occasion, they decided not to move against the crowd – which was armed with plastic helmets, makeshift cardboard shields and umbrellas – apparently falling back instead.

    Inside the central legislative chamber, one protester sprayed black paint across the emblem of Hong Kong on the rear wall - while another waved the old colonial flag, which features the union jack of the United Kingdom.

    Police had, however, used pepper spray and batons to contain crowds during earlier clashes.

    Pro-democracy demonstrators had taken to the streets on the anniversary of the city's handover from UK to Chinese rule.

    This is the latest in a series of protests against a controversial bill that would allow extraditions to mainland China.

    The government has agreed to suspend it indefinitely, but rallies continue amid calls for Chief Executive Carrie Lam to resign.

    Hong Kong, a former British colony, has been part of China since 1997 under a "one country, two systems" deal that guarantees it a level of autonomy. Pro-democracy events are held every year to mark the handover.

    The LegCo building was put on red alert for the first ever time on Monday - meaning people should evacuate the building and area.

    But by 21:00 (13:00 GMT), the watching crowd had grown rather than dispersed, and hundreds of protesters streamed through the broken glass into the building proper.

    What happened on Monday?
    In the morning, a flag-raising ceremony to mark the handover took place inside the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, amid a heavy police presence.

    Demonstrators blocked several roads nearby early using items like metal and plastic barriers.

    Police officers equipped with shields, batons and pepper spray clashed with hundreds of protesters about 30 minutes before the ceremony.

    At least one woman was seen bleeding from a head wound after the clashes, AFP news agency says.

    A police statement condemned "illegal acts" by protesters who, it said, had taken iron poles and guard rails from nearby building sites.

    Thirteen police officers were taken to hospital after protesters threw an "unknown liquid" at them, police said. Some are reported to have suffered breathing difficulties as a result.

    Thousands joined a mostly peaceful pro-democracy march on Monday afternoon.

    At about lunchtime, a breakaway group of protesters moved to LegCo where the government meets. The small group began ramming the glass doors with a metal trolley, succeeding in smashing in the door, before largely dispersing.

    On Monday evening, some then returned to LegCo and began pulling off external fencing and entered the building.

    Protesters were than contained by a heavy-duty internal gate, where police were standing ready to respond. But after they eventually prised the gate open, police fell back further inside the building.

    One man, identifying himself as G, told the BBC at the scene that protesters were expecting violence.

    "The movement is now beyond the bill. It's about the autonomy of Hong Kong," he said.

    "I do worry about the potential public backlash. Everything we do has a risk and this is one of the risks that people here are willing to take."

    The government condemned what it labelled "extremely violent" acts, adding police would "take appropriate enforcement action to protect public order and safety".

    Speaking at the earlier flag ceremony, Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam had pledged to spend more time listening to the public so that the government's future work would be "more responsive" to its "aspirations, sentiments and opinions".

    It was Ms Lam's first public appearance since 18 June, when she issued an apology for her handling of the extradition law.

    Special significance
    Karishma Vaswani, BBC News, Hong Kong


    Hong Kong has a history of peaceful protests and for the most part these demonstrations were calm, barring these clashes with police.

    The overwhelming sense I got after speaking to many here is that there is a real anger amongst young people and frustration with how Hong Kong is being run. They want protesters detained released, the bill withdrawn and Carrie Lam to resign.

    Away from the anger I also saw remarkable scenes of co-operation. One by one people passed umbrellas, helmets and cling film to each other as they stood firm against the police who had brought pepper spray and batons to fight back.

    As evening fell, the crowds swelled - as the protesters were joined by families with young children who had joined the pro-democracy march that takes place every year to mark the handover of Hong Kong to mainland China.

    But this year it's taken on a special significance - a chance to show the government here that they won't give up their city without a fight.

    Why have people been protesting?
    Hong Kong's "one country, two systems" system allows it freedoms not seen in mainland China, including judicial independence.

    The extradition bill raised concerns for that status.

    Critics of the bill feared it could be used to target opponents of the government in Beijing, and to bring Hong Kong further under China's control.

    On 12 June police used tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse crowds marching against the bill - the worst violence in the city in decades.

    Eventually, the demonstrations forced the government to apologise and suspend the planned extradition law.

    However, many protesters said they would not back down until the bill had been completely scrapped.

    Many are still angry about the level of force used by police on 12 June, and have called for an investigation.

    "The Hong Kong police's well-documented use of excessive force against peaceful protesters urgently demands a fully independent investigation," said Sophie Richardson, China director at Human Rights Watch, in a statement.

    However, there have also been smaller demonstrations by the territory's pro-Beijing movement.

    On Sunday, thousands of pro-Beijing protesters rallied in support of the Hong Kong police.

    One pro-Beijing protester told AFP police were just trying to "maintain order", calling the anti-extradition protesters "senseless".
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  4. #49
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    I just watched the most unprofessional journalism I’ve ever seen from what should be a reputable news source: CNN.

    The unnamed journalist (a woman in a pink shirt) didn’t interview Alan Hoo, CPPCC member and Vice Chair of the Liberal Party, about the invasion of LegCo.
    She debated him.
    She interrupted him.
    She harangued him.

    It was embarrassing.
    Trust me?
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  5. #50
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    This is an exciting development indeed, after the peaceful protesters thrashed the HK legislature building, the police will now have all the excuse they need to manage the situation with the proper amount of force. Disillusioned Hongkongers who do not wish to stay in HK under CCP rule will find ways to relocate to other countries, and the Philippines is always open for HK investors willing to pool their money into the country.

  6. #51
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOR View Post
    I just watched the most unprofessional journalism I’ve ever seen from what should be a reputable news source: CNN.

    The unnamed journalist (a woman in a pink shirt) didn’t interview Alan Hoo, CPPCC member and Vice Chair of the Liberal Party, about the invasion of LegCo.
    She debated him.
    She interrupted him.
    She harangued him.

    It was embarrassing.
    And you are surprised ? i stopped listening to CNN the moment Trump was elected

  7. #52
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    And you are surprised ? i stopped listening to CNN the moment Trump was elected
    Yes, I'm surprised, and it is pretty interesting that you are not.
    How's Fox News these days?
    Trust me?
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  8. #53
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOR View Post
    Yes, I'm surprised, and it is pretty interesting that you are not.
    How's Fox News these days?
    Ever heard of PBS, i recommend it

  9. #54
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    I thought they weren't allowed to get into the inner chambers of LegCo, they did and graffiti'd it up good.

  10. #55
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    Ever heard of PBS, i recommend it
    I prefer sources with people on the ground.
    I never met a full-time PBS journalist in Hong Kong (nor one from Fox), but I met dozens from CNN, Bloomberg, BBC, Reuters, and other reputable sources.
    Trust me?
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  11. #56
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOR View Post
    I prefer sources with people on the ground.
    I never met a full-time PBS journalist in Hong Kong (nor one from Fox), but I met dozens from CNN, Bloomberg, BBC, Reuters, and other reputable sources.
    They interview people who are on the ground, they have foreign correspondents.



    Is it really necessary to be present on site full time i don't think so. They can always interview others who do know.

    This is old school style reporting where reporters just reported what they saw or heard instead of "journalists" today who inject their opinion on top.

    Reuters does well with print, i don't find they are into video much.

    Go on, tell me what is wrong in this interview ?
    Last edited by Double Edge; 04 Jul 19, at 09:58.

  12. #57
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Good to see some British spine

    'Unacceptable': UK summons Chinese ambassador over Hong Kong comments | SMH | Jul 04 2019

    The UK government summoned China's ambassador for a dressing-down on Wednesday after Beijing officials accused Britain of meddling in Hong Kong's affairs.

  13. #58
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    They interview people who are on the ground, they have foreign correspondents.



    Is it really necessary to be present on site full time i don't think so. They can always interview others who do know.

    This is old school style reporting where reporters just reported what they saw or heard instead of "journalists" today who inject their opinion on top.

    Reuters does well with print, i don't find they are into video much.

    Go on, tell me what is wrong in this interview ?

    Nick Schifrin isn’t a bad journalist. He also isn’t a … what was that phrase? Oh, yeah: “a full-time PBS journalist in Hong Kong.” That’s why it is a broad piece educating Americans on what Hong Kong is, and the history over the past two decades. This is elementary level analysis.

    (I also note the anchor mispronounced Michael Tian’s name as “Tee-en.” Lots of China expertise there.)
    Trust me?
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  14. #59
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    They interview people who are on the ground, they have foreign correspondents.



    Is it really necessary to be present on site full time i don't think so. They can always interview others who do know.

    This is old school style reporting where reporters just reported what they saw or heard instead of "journalists" today who inject their opinion on top.

    Reuters does well with print, i don't find they are into video much.

    Go on, tell me what is wrong in this interview ?

    Nick Schifrin isn’t a bad journalist. He also isn’t a … what was that phrase? Oh, yeah: “a full-time PBS journalist in Hong Kong.” That’s why it is a broad piece educating Americans on what Hong Kong is, and the history over the past two decades. This is elementary level analysis.

    (I also note the anchor mispronounced Michael Tian’s name as “Tee-en.” Lots of China expertise there.)
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  15. #60
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOR View Post
    Nick Schifrin isn’t a bad journalist. He also isn’t a … what was that phrase? Oh, yeah: “a full-time PBS journalist in Hong Kong.” That’s why it is a broad piece educating Americans on what Hong Kong is, and the history over the past two decades. This is elementary level analysis.

    (I also note the anchor mispronounced Michael Tian’s name as “Tee-en.” Lots of China expertise there.)
    Elementary it might be but its not being spun which other way and informative for outsiders.

    elementary + elmentary + elementary adds up to something

    Then only local media will do for you. Do you trust HK media ?

    Or just wait for it be discussed at some reputable think tanks and you will get a summary for the month
    Last edited by Double Edge; 05 Jul 19, at 16:01.

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