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Thread: USS Wisconsin ....

  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    Since you asked....

    I was privileged to have four (4) docents during my 2-day inspection.
    As is tradition with most large ships the "buddy system is used" with a header and a heeler for the docents.

    On what I'll call the "04" tour Tom ( an "E7" rated RU, who served on the BB-63) was the header and did an admirable job explaining the O-6's job aboard a ship while showing his in port and at sea cabins. The "heeler" was Bob ( an "O5" who'd been a seadog serving on 5-ships), His last gig was as XO on a Cimarron Class AO... ( I think I got that right)

    Pictures of what I'll call the "CIC" will follow in this thread.

    For the record both of these pictures were taken in the Admiral's stateroom, which I was informed an admiral never slept in?
    Looks these Navy Vets are still on duty for their country. Thanks to them. I assume the Docents are volunteers like most Museum Ships.

    I saw in their annual report that attendance was up in 2017 so I hope City/Foundation have enough money to keep Whiskey in ship shape.

  2. #47
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    Funding ....

    Quote Originally Posted by FlankDestroyer View Post
    Looks these Navy Vets are still on duty for their country. Thanks to them. I assume the Docents are volunteers like most Museum Ships.

    I saw in their annual report that attendance was up in 2017 so I hope City/Foundation have enough money to keep Whiskey in ship shape.
    On the second day of the tour I met the gentleman pictured below. He shared that he was the last XO on the last diesel electric boat in the Navy.

    I surmised it must of been the USS Blueback SS-581 one of the "B-girls". He related how he never got an interview with Adm. Hyman Rickover for a nuclear sub as the minimum GPA was 3.7, so he retired after 20 years.

    Later in the thread when we get to the fireroom more information will follow about this particular docent.

    On the funding side for O/M, the docent tours generate approximately 2/3's of BB-64's annual budget, while the city of Norfolk* writes a check for the remaining 1/3. (* unconfirmed)

    A large item completed last year was the painting of the hull below the waterline.
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    Last edited by blidgepump; 03 Sep 18, at 04:22.

  3. #48
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    Moving aft...

    Two pictures offer a view of the Whisky under the Noon day sun.
    The deck and gear are kept in order. Note the "Red Line" is even freshly painted on the deck.
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  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    Two pictures offer a view of the Whisky under the Noon day sun.
    The deck and gear are kept in order. Note the "Red Line" is even freshly painted on the deck.
    Bilge pump the Wisconsin as indicated by ur excel the images seems indeed to be well maintained! Your first image is as I describe in an earlier post. The antenna gets in the way of the view! However I understand the necessity of the antenna in its present location. When I visited her a few years ago I tried to recapture the expereance of the 70’s buy standing just underneath the aft portion of the antenna however to me it was just not the same! But the only constant in life is change! None the less Norfolk has done a great job with the ship!

  5. #50
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    Pelican hooks & bollards...

    Note to the thread followers....

    It was suggested that a reference be provided when macro photos are presented.
    I.e., you're so close to the trees you can't tell anything about the forest.
    So... as I'm still learning how to present stuff, a reference photo is included.
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  6. #51
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    Anchor chain...

    A recital about "Shots", "chain link weight" & "paint color" provide the basic tools to attach the ships to its anchor.
    And someone has applied a fresh coat of black paint, too.

    Note the checker plate for the anchor chain to slide upon & the pelican hooks secured to prevent an accidental release of either anchor.
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    Last edited by blidgepump; 06 Sep 18, at 04:27.

  7. #52
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    Capstan & Wildcats ....

    The Whisky's Capstan & Wildcats are ready for a fresh coat of paint.
    These pictures provide a view of the anchor chain, and the controls for the friction brakes.
    Attached is a bitmap for those not knowledgeable about the "Bitter end" mentioned in the previous post.
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  8. #53
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    Looking aft...

    Looking aft from the Capstans you begin to notice some of the "Non USN" modifications to the Whisky.
    The davit and vent stacks are a couple that my novice eye caught. I'm still working on the "white I-beam's purpose".
    Note the teak decking was replaced and in great condition.
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  9. #54
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    From expereance, the bitter end was not always successful in preventing anchor and chain loss. It depended on the water depth and how long the breakers slowed the momentum before they became useless.......a runaway anchor is no fun and something to stay far away from! In a word dangerous! We were always aprihensive when testing the breakes on the windlass, for USCG COI and ABS Loadline.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boilermaker9 View Post
    From expereance, the bitter end was not always successful in preventing anchor and chain loss. It depended on the water depth and how long the breakers slowed the momentum before they became useless.......a runaway anchor is no fun and something to stay far away from! In a word dangerous! We were always aprihensive when testing the breakes on the windlass, for USCG COI and ABS Loadline.

    You are absolutely right about that link. Indeed it was designed to break/shear if the load was too great! The last thing you want is to drag pieces of the ship up several decks when the chain is running wild. The link will stop the chain if you are lowering on to a barge etc.


    The Brake test was very exciting to say the least. Stopping a 25 ton anchor (plus all the chain) in deep water means you really have to believe it will work.


    Museums make choices with their signage so that average guests get the idea so sometimes there are "mostly" right signs.
    Last edited by FlankDestroyer; 11 Sep 18, at 21:00.

  11. #56
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    Video of an actual anchor runaway/loss. USS Tarawa (LHA-1).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7pRfix_sNg

    Eric

  12. #57
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    Bitter end ...

    Quote Originally Posted by elc32955 View Post
    Video of an actual anchor runaway/loss. USS Tarawa (LHA-1).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7pRfix_sNg

    Eric
    That anchor chain whipping around on the deck was cleaning house.
    I had to smile at 5:47... one of the Chiefs starting talking about getting the Starboard anchor ready.

  13. #58
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    Pausing the thread for a Hurricane ....

    With the approach of a Hurricane to the East coast of our Nation, and 30+ ships ordered to sea previously anchored at Norfolk, I wanted to share this photo of one of three Super Carriers anchored when I took a boat tour one Sunday afternoon at the suggestion of the Eisenhower's CAG. To my surprise, the Lincoln had slipped in over night with its planes on deck. A rare sight as we know but the rest of the story learned that next day filming for the new "Top Gun" movie would take place aboard the Lincoln. [ Ah stage props ??? ]

    Next my request to tour the Eisenhower on the following Friday was turned down.... oh well. ( .... because the reactivation of the Atlantic Fleet Ceremony would take place I learned later). So I settled for a private tour of the "Ships of the Line" and spent the afternoon at the Norfolk Yacht Club listening to Sea stories. No so bad.

    But on the brighter side I'm please that my visit occurred prior to the arrival of a Hurricane.
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    Last edited by blidgepump; 13 Sep 18, at 03:28.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    That anchor chain whipping around on the deck was cleaning house.
    I had to smile at 5:47... one of the Chiefs starting talking about getting the Starboard anchor ready.
    Let’s just suffice it to say a run away anchor and chain is a very dangerous event! In the video the windlass machinery is a deck below, the dust you are seeing is a combination of rust and brake liner dust. The ships I was involved with had the windlass on deck out in the elements. If on considers the say a 25 ton anchor each link in a chain 100-200 or so lbs. and one of thos links parts as the brake is drawn up, well it can get dicie to say the least. If that chain starts whipping it will take out everything in its path! One can see the distance from the capstan to the hawspipe in the video and the people moving about. Personally during the drop test I had all personnel not actually associated with the test by hands on out of the area or up on the next deck just for safety reasons. Although not as dangerous as the wire rope used in unrep or the mooring/towing lines an anchor chain is still very dangerous. Anchor chain is not as springy more rigid and expose lengths much shorter.
    Every dry docking we ranged the chain, paid it out disconnected the bitter end, laid it out in the dock detached the anchor, hammer tested it. Recoated the chain locker, NDT the bitter end bulkhead connection, blasted, coated the chain. End for ended it, remarked it, reattached the anchor and put the whole system back together. Reinstalled the chain in the chain locker and connected the bitter end. Stowed the remainder of the chain back in the chain locker reseating the anchor, until the drop test at sea trials. Similar as shown in the Vedic. This was done for both port and stbd anchor systems once every drydocking. That is a general overview of anchor system Maintainence and regulatory body requirements for ABS/USCG inspected ships. A a lot of work!

  15. #60
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    Called away to a grassy knoll ....

    Sorry for the unannounced pause in posting more pictures.
    I was called away to Dallas on short notice.
    In an unrelated event I found myself standing on a grassy knoll...
    Note to self... "Try to avoid the conspiracy vendors".
    There were no fewer than 5 men selling newspapers, DVDs and tours about the November 22, 1963, "Shot heard round the world".
    So to mix things up a little bit I will untangle the "fake news" and offer the following observations.

    1. Lee Harvey Oswald did not have that hard a shot for a competent marksman and the Marines have a pretty fair training program.
    2. Lee Harvey Oswald was not trained in avoiding detection, he made several boo boos besides killing a Dallas police officer.
    3. Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman.

    Okay, since eating fish sticks and potatoes that Friday 55 years ago in my cafeteria while attending 2nd grade; I finally have closure..... I can move on!
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    Last edited by blidgepump; 24 Sep 18, at 12:09.

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