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Thread: Bachelor Cuisine

  1. #121
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    OK an easy one, that I had last night.

    Samgyeopsal-gui

    Fried pork belly

    And this is a cook at the table meal using an electric skillet.

    Ingredients

    Sliced pork belly (or thick bacon) Not the salt or sugar cured type either. Just plain pork belly

    Lettuce leaves. We use red leaf lettuce. Romaine would be good also. Iceberg lettuce should only be used as bait in a rabbit trap.
    A few cloves of garlic thinly sliced
    Long grain white rice. Could use Jasmine rice if you like
    Salt
    Pepper
    Sesame Seed oil

    Cut the port into bite size pieces allowing for shrinkage during cooking (make it bigger than you think)
    Grill/fry the pork. No need to add oil to the pan.
    When a piece gets cooked take half a lief of lettuce .Make a bed of rice in it. Place a sliver of raw garlic on the rice. Add pork

    Dip in a mixture of salt pepper and sesame seed oil. Stuff it in your mouth and enjoy.

    If you don't like the taste of raw garlic, you can throw it in the skillet with the pork and cook till brown

    If Yeller is still lurking he will add either hot pepper paste or miso paste in with the wrap. Most people don't have that handy. But FYI I really like the miso paste on this.
    Another good addition to this is to throw a little KimChee in with the pork.

    And when eating pork. Drinking Soju is a must.

    Its the only way I eat pork. And I do it about twice a year
    This is like a recipe in one of those Zagat/Munchies/Eater videos. Must be very good.

    It's been 6 months I didn't eat pork. Talking about pork, the Portuguese used to make Pork Vin-d-ahlu, and the Goans adopted it as Vin-d-aloo. Ahlu in Portuguese stands for garlic, and aloo in India means potato. So the Goan version has potato cubes in it, while I don't put potato in my version.

    Ingredients:
    #1. 1/2kg pork (curry cut pieces)
    #2. Vin, as in Vinegar, half a cup. Normal vinegar, nothing fancy.
    #3. Freshly made ginger+garlic paste
    #4. Garlic, thinly sliced, or if the pieces are small then there's no need to slice them. Do, remember this is a dish where garlic is as important as the pork.
    #5. Spices - Chilli powder, tumeric powder, coriander powder, cumin powder. A small tablespoon of each would do. 2 tbps of the chilli powder for color and a little heat.
    #6. Slit green chillies for more heat. Leave it if you can't handle heat.
    #7. Thinly sliced raw onions. 2 medium sized should be okay.

    Marination:
    Take a big bowl and put the pork in it. Add the spices, ginger-garlic paste, slit green chillies, garlic (thinly sliced), and half a cup of vinegar. Mix them with your hand. Remember, do not add excess vinegar. The use of vinegar is to tenderize the meat, and add flavour, and it should be used just enough so that the spices and meat get marinated well enough to stick together.

    Let it rest on the fridge for a minimum of 12 hours.

    Recipe:
    Take the marinated pork out of the fridge 1 hour prior to cooking.

    #1. Add mustard oil in a Kadai. Kadai is an Indian cooking piece, that looks much like a wok, but is thicker. Google it.
    #2. When the oil is nice and hot, add cinnamon (3 inch pieces), cardamom (4-5 large green ones), cloves (2-3), 2 dry bay leaves. Let it fry for a minute. Then, add the sliced onions and fry till it becomes pinkish/translucent.
    #3. Add the marinated pork along with the spices etc, in the Kadai in full heat.
    #4. Stir the pork with a spatula. Keep stirring it in high heat for about 7-8 mins, at an interval of 2 mins. Lower the heat to medium. Keep stirring at regular intervals of 4-5 mins.

    ** Always fry the meat well with the masalas. The taste will surprise you.**

    #5. Keep frying. Total frying time should be 30-40 mins. Do remember that stirring is also necessary so that the spices don't get stuck in the bottom of the Kadai and to keep it from burning.

    Add a little water, if you can't follow directions and your pork has got stuck at the bottom.

    #6. Transfer the fried pork into a pressure cooker.
    #7. Add 4 cups of water into the cooker.
    #8. Close the lid and let it cook. Stop it, when the cooker blows 2 whistles. (Now this depends on the quality of meat. For pork found in India, I use 16-18 whistles, for the pork you guys get in your markets, 2 whistles should be enough. If not, you can close the lid and cook again.)

    Enjoy with white rice.
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  2. #122
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    I'm kind of partial to Chinese curries (edit) I don't like the sweetness of the coconut milk or yogurt in the Indian curries I've eaten
    What you guys eat in the west is not authentic Indian curry. I had this talk with the good Colonel some years back here at WAB. In India, cuisines change every 200 kms. Coconut milk is used to make curries in South India, and from what I have seen - coconut milk has fallen out of favour and cuisine nowadays even in South India.

    Chicken butter masala is one dish that is kind of sweet, and a dish to die for. One can't just get enough. Punjabi dish.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    And I know, I'm the weird one that thinks plain white rice right out of the rice cooker is one of the best flavors ever
    Yes. But I still need a good curry.
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  3. #123
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    How about this?

    Went to Aldi today. On sale were 1 lb. packages of Deutsche Kuche Smoked Knackwurst, and 10 oz. packages of cracker cut gouda and extra sharp cheddar slices.

    Since they were each only $0.99 apiece, I got 11 of each. Cost was $21.78 total.

    The Strategic Knackwurst-Gouda-Cheddar Reserve.

    I approve. :D

    The names are weird. I guess smoked sausages. Cheese and some biscuits.
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  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    What you guys eat in the west is not authentic Indian curry.
    That also depends heavily on where in the West. Pretty much all Indian restaurants around me tend to run the same menu composition - mostly tandoori meat dishes, some originally south indian vegetarian stuff reinterpreted in a New Delhi fashion, a few uh... colonial variants ("korma" in british style, vindaloos), and at best a handful of actual curries that will never contain coconut milk. The main difference between restaurants will be whether they have any paneer dishes.

    Most of the owners around here tend to be North Indians with some variation (caveat: there's one guy from Kashmir that owns like a quarter of all restaurants in town, including a number of "Indian" places), and for some reason most of the cooks are Punjabis. There's one sort of South Indian owned place (owner's from Bangalore) that sells dosas and such as well as some curries that look like they're 50% coconut milk for lunch takeout.

  5. #125
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    kato,

    If it's not a Michelin starred restaurant, or a famous Indian chain, you simply cannot expect authentic Indian food. Anybody can open up a restaurant and name it "Taj Mahal" or "Delhi Durbar". Most, if not all, Indian restaurants are run by Pak/Bangladeshi origin immigrants.

    Michelin star restaurants are outside the reach of most for weekend food, plus the food they serve is less. The food though is exotic and very good.

    Look at this restaurant - Tayyabs. I have eaten there many times, and I can vouch that the food is good {Worse, Poor, Average, Good, Great (1 Michelin star), Excellent (2 Michelin stars), Heavenly (3 Michelin stars) in that order}. It's run by 2 or 3 Pakistani brothers and I've seen a lot of Brits/EU guys/families go and eat there. Well, when people don't know what good Indian food tastes like, they are bound to spend money on whatever they find in the West.

    If you happen to visit India, you should make it a point to visit Bukhara and Indian Accent etc, find out what authentic and good quality Indian food is all about. Also smaller shops like the Parantha Wala galli in Chandni Chowk. Awesome food for very cheap money. I can bet West doesn't have a single Indian/IndianNamed restaurant serving such authentic Paranthas and tasty meat dishes, so friendly on the purse.

    As for identities, most people fake it because Indian sells better than Pakistani (for obvious reasons) and Bangladeshi. Amongst the fake Indian restaurants, Bangladeshis tend to do a very poor job. Pakistanis are still better when they market their food as Indian - taste-wise, money-wise. Infact Pakistani restaurants are better than Bangladeshi and Indian restaurants in the west.
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  6. #126
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    I don't know if parboiled rice is nutritious, but this is what is eaten in 99% of Indian home, 99% of the time.
    The parboiling process infuses 80% of the vitamins and minerals found in the bran into the endosperm. So yes, it is nutritious. It also has a glycemic index of 32, compared to 50 for brown rice and 89 for white rice. The lower glycemic index means that that it digests more slowly, and blood sugar rises more slowly.

    If white rice isn't fortified, it essentially has zero nutritional value, other than calories. Parboiled rice is still nutritionally superior to fortified rice. Some people might not like the taste or texture, but in an era in which B-vitamin deficiency diseases were epidemic, prior to the first half of the 20th century, parboiled rice saved many lives.
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  7. #127
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
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    But there is no reason to eat shitty tasting rice in the 21st century. At least not in the States. There are much better sources of B-6. Like meat,beans and veggies
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  8. #128
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    As far as the taste goes, I like it better than any white rice I've ever had. That just happens to be my personal preference.

    With its low glycemic index (32 vs 89 for white rice), it's also far more suitable for people who need to avoid severe blood sugar spikes (diabetics).

    It's also got a broader amount of nutrients than just B-6. 1 cup, unenriched, dry:



    Source: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...d-pasta/5814/2
    Last edited by Ironduke; 14 Jul 18, at 04:35.
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  9. #129
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Ironduke,

    It was incorrect when I said parboiled rice is eaten 99% of the time in India. It seems, I was confused between names. It's white rice that is eaten. Not much is left after the removal of the bran w.r.t. nutrients, but taste-wise this is better I guess. Once, I bought a brown looking rice from Tesco (I didn't check the color while buying), and I couldn't eat it after cooking it as it seemed rubbery. Went to a Bangladeshi shop and bought white rice thereafter. My apologies.

    Also explains the fact why so many people have diabetes and heart diseases in India.
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  10. #130
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    I knew what you meant. I know that parboiled rice isn't eaten in India. It's popular in parts of Africa though, apparently.

    Parboiled rice is chewier than white rice, because the starches have been gelatinized during the parboiling process, and the kernels don't stick together like they do with white rice, they stay separate. Parboiled rice has a yellowish-orange tint to it.
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  11. #131
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    I knew what you meant. I know that parboiled rice isn't eaten in India. It's popular in parts of Africa though, apparently.

    Parboiled rice is chewier than white rice, because the starches have been gelatinized during the parboiling process, and the kernels don't stick together like they do with white rice, they stay separate. Parboiled rice has a yellowish-orange tint to it.
    Yes.

    Now, please identify the item:

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  12. #132
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    /\/\/\ That's wild cilantro. :D
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  13. #133
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    How about this?

    Went to Aldi today. On sale were 1 lb. packages of Deutsche Kuche Smoked Knackwurst, and 10 oz. packages of cracker cut gouda and extra sharp cheddar slices.

    Since they were each only $0.99 apiece, I got 11 of each. Cost was $21.78 total.

    The Strategic Knackwurst-Gouda-Cheddar Reserve.

    Sadly, 16 days later, I'm down to my last package of cheese, and I'm all out of knackwurst. I did give away a package of knackwurst and a container of the cheese to a friend, but I've managed to eat 50 knackwursten (10lbs/4.5kg) and nine 10 oz packages (2.55kg) of gouda and cheddar.

    It was delicious, and it went a long way, for just ~$22. I'll always look back fondly at these last 16 days, and it'll be a tale to tell my future cardiologist.

    On the other hand, I did manage to cut my milk consumption back from 3 gallons a week to just a half-gallon per week while the cheese lasted, and ate no sour cream, cottage cheese, or yogurt either during that time. That ought to mitigate some of the potential plaque buildup in the arteries.
    Last edited by Ironduke; 26 Jul 18, at 19:57.
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  14. #134
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Cooked Chicken Biryani in a Pressure Cooker. I call it bachelor's Chicken Biryani, hassle-free and easy to make. The white looking thing is raita, goes well with the Biryani.

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    I used normal sona mussorie rice. Basmati rice has a lot of starch, and is not fit to be cooked inside a pressure cooker of this type. The rick will break while cooking and make the biryani very sticky. Use Basmati rice only when cooking Biryani in the open.
    Last edited by Oracle; 10 Aug 18, at 13:34.
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