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Thread: China's mass surveillance state

  1. #91
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    'China's big mistake': Pakistanis lobby to free wives trapped in Xinjiang

    BEIJING (Reuters) - Pakistani businessmen whose wives and children are trapped in China’s restive Xinjiang are travelling to Beijing to lobby their embassy, in hopes that the south Asian nation’s new government will pressure its ally for their release.

    Beijing has faced an outcry from activists, some governments and U.N. human rights experts over mass detentions and strict surveillance of the mostly Muslim Uighur minority, and other Muslim groups, in the western region.

    Mirza Imran Baig, 40, who trades between his home city of Lahore and Urumqui, the Xinjiang regional capital, said his wife was detained in a “re-education” camp in her native Bachu county for two months in May and June 2017 and had been unable to leave her hometown since her release.

    His wife, Mailikemu Maimati, 33, and their four-year-old son, who are both Chinese nationals, are unable to get their passports back from Chinese authorities, he told Reuters outside the Pakistan embassy in Beijing.

    “My ambassador says, ‘Wait, wait, wait, one day, two days.’ Okay, I wait,” Baig said late on Tuesday, after his meeting.

    Reuters could not immediately reach the ambassador, Masood Khalid, to seek comment.

    Beijing says it faces a serious threat from Islamist militants and separatists in Xinjiang and has rejected accusations of mistreatment.

    Asked about the Pakistani businessmen on Tuesday, Geng Shuang, a spokesman for the Foreign Ministry, told a regular news briefing that he was not aware of the situation.

    Muslim majority nations have mostly remained silent over the situation in Xinjiang.

    Last month’s election of cricketing legend and firebrand nationalist Imran Khan as Pakistan’s prime minister has fed the expectations of many for him to deliver on promises to create jobs, build an Islamic welfare state and restore the country’s image abroad.

    Mian Shahid Ilyas, a businessman in Lahore who has been collecting details of cases and seeking government support, said he was optimistic the new government would help.

    Pakistan’s foreign ministry in Islamabad did not reply to questions from Reuters on the Uighur spouses.

    “A lot of people get married like us. It’s no problem. But in 2017 they start to seal everything off in Xinjiang,” Ilyas, who said his Chinese Uighur wife, a citizen of China, had been detained since April 2017, told Reuters by telephone.

    Ilyas said he had confirmed details of 38 cases but believed there were more than 300 similar cases of Pakistani husbands whose wives and children, most of them Uighurs, had been stuck in Xinjiang for more than a year, in camps or confined to homes.

    The handful of businessmen, including Baig, is travelling to China in groups of twos and threes, to avoid raising suspicion, parking themselves at the embassy to make their case, he said.

    “This is China’s big mistake,” said Ilyas. “Before people did not know how they treated Muslims. Now, everyone knows.”
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  4. #94
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    Wife of ex-Interpol chief fears for her life with her husband detained in China

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    The wife of Interpol's former chief has said she fears for her life and that of her twin boys after her husband was detained by Chinese officials, in the latest case of a forced disappearance in Beijing.

    In an exclusive one-on-one interview with CNN in Lyon, France, Grace Meng said she had received a threatening phone call from a stranger after her husband vanished. She said the stranger told her "two teams" were coming to target her
    .
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  5. #95
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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    "I think it's very concerning (that) China thinks it can abduct and arbitrarily detain the sitting head of an international organization without serious consequences," said Caster.
    See, this is the thing. He's the head of Interpol.

    When i heard this earlier i thought the Head of China's interpol was arrested.

    Oh no, he's higher than that.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 10 Oct 18, at 12:16.

  7. #97
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    See, this is the thing. He's the head of Interpol.

    When i heard this earlier i thought the Head of China's interpol was arrested.

    Oh no, he's higher than that.
    This has been the order of thinking in the CPC for decades. That they can get away with anything. With President Trump that tide seems to be turning. Don't be fooled into believing what 50 centers argue what the US or others did in 1920s or the 1950s. This is the 2018, and the times of Emperors, Kings, Queens are long gone and tin-pot dictators of authoritarian regimes are feeling the heat. How long will dictators last is an open question.
    Last edited by Oracle; 10 Oct 18, at 13:58.
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  8. #98
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    Heeding China's call, Hong Kong tightens grip on dissent

    HONG KONG- As Hong Kong's government hews closer to Beijing, officials are taking a tough line on perceived national security threats, even deploying an elite police unit for political monitoring and surveillance - a sharp escalation in rhetoric and action.

    In just the last few months, the special administrative region has banned the Hong Kong National Party, which espouses separation from China, and barred some activists from standing in local elections.

    The Education Bureau sent all secondary schools in the Special Administrative Region letters on Sept 24 saying they must prohibit "the penetration" of the National Party or risk prosecution.

    And this month, Hong Kong refused to renew the work visa of Victor Mallet, Asia news editor for the British-based Financial Times newspaper, after he hosted a speech by an independence activist.

    "We can see them (the government) being much more assertive in using these powers and in shaping their policy decisions to reflect the national interests," said Professor Simon Young of the University of Hong Kong's law school, saying the courts may be a last line of defence against government overreach.

    Serving and retired police officers, lawyers and lawmakers describe intensifying political operations by the police force's Security Wing, an elite unit that officially handles sensitive tasks including VIP protection and counter-terrorism investigations.

    Sources familiar with the wing's work say it led surveillance and monitoring operations against the National Party and more than a dozen other groups.

    The Hong Kong Journalists Association recently described the prospect of tougher national security enforcement as "a sword dangled above the heads" of reporters.

    The Financial Times said it was appealing the decision denying Mallet a work visa. In his role as first vice president of the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Hong Kong, Mallet in August hosted Andy Chan, head of the National Party.

    The party was banned last month as an "imminent threat to national security" as the government invoked little-known clauses of a law regulating private groups and societies.

    Authorities have so far refused to explain their decision on Mallet, except to say that no independence advocacy will be tolerated.

    Chan, a bespectacled 28-year-old interior decorator, says that his ideology springs from China's broken promises towards Hong Kong and that claims he might destabilise China are preposterous.

    But Hong Kong's government is treating even the consideration of independence as a vital threat.

    "Worryingly, they have been parroting the ideological and authoritarian line of Beijing ... irreparably undermining their reputation," one diplomat said of the city's government.

    In the letter to schools last month, the Education Bureau said, "should students have erroneous and extreme thoughts, principals and teachers should correct them with facts." Some teachers described this to Reuters as a "gagging order."

    That appears to run contrary to Hong Kong's mini-constitution, known as the Basic Law, which stresses freedoms of speech and assembly.

    Some youths who drove the pro-democracy "Umbrella Revolution" street demonstrations in 2014 say there is a growing sense of despair at the pressure on civil society and individual rights.

    Daniel Cheung, a 29-year-old photographer who worked on "Chronicle of a Summer," a documentary on activists such as jailed independence leader Edward Leung, said the situation was worsening fast.

    "Put simply, if you see Hong Kong as a house built by the British, this house is now crumbling and leaking. It has been hit by a typhoon and close to toppling over," Cheung said.

    "BACK TO THE FUTURE"
    The Basic Law requires the city to create laws against treason, secession and subversion of the national government, effectively updating those from the colonial era.

    The laws from British rule, while broad, do not outlaw calls for independence or self-determination.

    Previous attempts to draft a harsher new national security law, known as Article 23, were met with mass protests and abandoned. Chief Executive Carrie Lam, who took office last year, has not yet proposed a new version, a reflection in part of lingering public concern.

    But many observers say the government is using the Security Wing to tighten its grip even without Article 23.

    The wing's officers were deeply involved in producing the 700-page dossier the government used to justify banning the National Party. The document tracked its statements, public appearances and activities.

    For some, that has echoes of the colonial-era Special Branch, which monitored potentially subversive Chinese and Russian communist activity across Hong Kong during the Cold War. The agency was disbanded in 1995, two years before Britain handed Hong Kong back to China.

    "It is clear it (Security Wing) is doing much more political work now," said James To, a veteran democracy advocate who has spent much of his 27 years in the city's parliament scrutinizing the government's security policies.

    "My worry is that when you monitor people's political life and thoughts you are going against the spirit of the human rights provisions of the Basic Law. There is a need for balance," To said.

    To said the government had repeatedly refused requests by Hong Kong's legislators to discuss the Security Wing's operations in detail.

    Headed by an assistant commissioner, the Wing has over 700 staff, according to government information provided to lawmakers in recent years, some of whom have close ties with mainland Chinese counterparts as well as foreign diplomats based in Hong Kong.

    One former senior officer familiar with the branch's work said he was witnessing a sea change in the government's previously hands-off approach.

    "It is back to the future," he said. "It is eerie to see them embark on the same kind of monitoring and control operations that we used to do with an entirely new generation."

    Police declined to comment on whether other activists or groups, including those calling for greater autonomy in the longer term such as Joshua Wong, were being targeted, saying the department wouldn't "disclose details of operations and investigations."

    Some observers see an expanding clampdown as inevitable given the political climate.

    "They (the police) are clear what China's thinking is on this issue," said a senior police source, who declined to be named given the sensitivity of the issue.
    Some older articles and related -> Three years after Umbrella Movement, Hong Kongers back on the streets

    Facing Jail, Democracy Activist Joshua Wong Says 'Hong Kong Is Under Threat'
    Last edited by Oracle; 13 Oct 18, at 13:38.
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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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  10. #100
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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  11. #101
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    What a fool that one woman is early in the video. All of this is going to make China more efficient and a safer place for her people. Right, and would you care for a load of dung with your coffee? Wonder what her tune will be when the day comes that the Party can read your thoughts which I am sure would be the ultimate goal in the Party's mind. That would be their idea of safer and efficient.

  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    What a fool that one woman is early in the video. All of this is going to make China more efficient and a safer place for her people. Right, and would you care for a load of dung with your coffee? Wonder what her tune will be when the day comes that the Party can read your thoughts which I am sure would be the ultimate goal in the Party's mind. That would be their idea of safer and efficient.

    It was only in recent years that Peking surpassed London in the number of CCTV. However london has more cameras per head of population. Where was the concern then for the use of CCTV in monitoring people?

    Oh thats right.The Uk is a defender of democracy and the cameras are there for saftey, while the ones in China are there for tyrannical purposes. ROFL.
    Last edited by Funtastic; 16 Oct 18, at 05:41.

  13. #103
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Hey, it's the Party mouthpiece once again talking about things he knows nothing about...

    Enjoy yourself...

    Bye...

  14. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Hey, it's the Party mouthpiece once again talking about things he knows nothing about...

    Enjoy yourself...

    Bye...
    I see you are resorting to making assumptions again.

    Exposining double standards has hit a raw nerve has it?



    bye

  15. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    What a fool that one woman is early in the video. All of this is going to make China more efficient and a safer place for her people. Right, and would you care for a load of dung with your coffee? Wonder what her tune will be when the day comes that the Party can read your thoughts which I am sure would be the ultimate goal in the Party's mind. That would be their idea of safer and efficient.
    That would be the thought process going on behind the scenes. It's quite simple actually, a one party communist regime enslaving its subjects for decades now adopts a technological revolution to control from the comfort of a air-conditioned room, with ease. At the end of the day, it's about the CPCs' survival. They would go to any lengths to see it through.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles! || Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain! || I am a far left millennial!

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