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Thread: US Steel & Aluminum Tariffs

  1. #481
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Donald Trump says he has 'a lot more to do' on China

    They lived too well for too long and, frankly, I guess they think the Americans are stupid people. Americans are not stupid people. We were led badly when it came to trade," Trump told "Fox & Friends."
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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  2. #482
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
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    WHO “lived too well for too long,” Americans? Chinese?
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  3. #483
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOR View Post
    WHO “lived too well for too long,” Americans? Chinese?
    Ni Hao!
    The article mentions Chinese. If you had read the article, you'd have known.

    In full offensive on China, Donald Trump gambles on end-game
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  4. #484
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    U.S. Strengthens Controls on Nuclear Technology Exports to China

    U.S. officials Thursday imposed new restrictions on nuclear exports to China after concluding that Beijing was seeking to illicitly acquire the technology to bolster its military and to undermine U.S. industry.

    The policy change is the latest bid by the Trump administration to thwart China’s pursuit of critical U.S. technology, following a recent measure to strengthen reviews of Chinese investment in Silicon Valley and other sensitive industries. It also comes amid rising security tensions between the two military powers.

    Officials said recent activity by Beijing and Chinese state-owned firms prompted a National Security Council-led review of U.S. nuclear policy toward China that concluded a change was necessary. They said they found evidence China was accelerating efforts to illicitly gain the technology for both military and commercial use, including on islands in disputed waters in the South China Sea, for floating nuclear power plants with the potential for rapid deployment, and for aircraft carriers and submarines. They said they also found that China was improperly diverting U.S. nuclear technology to other countries.

    The new rules, which take effect immediately, include a presumption of denial for the export of nuclear goods to China’s largest nuclear power company, the state-backed China General Nuclear Power Co., or CGN, officials said. CGN was the subject of a 2016 indictment—that also targeted U.S. citizen, Szuhsiung “Allen” Ho—that said the company was developing “special nuclear material” outside the U.S. without required U.S. authorization. Mr. Ho pleaded guilty in January 2017 for unlawfully enlisting U.S.-based nuclear experts to assist CGN and was sentenced to 24 months in prison.

    The restriction isn’t a blanket ban on sales, but it means that the U.S. will require a much higher degree of assurance that the technology wouldn’t be used improperly. The U.S. will review sales to non-CGN entities on a case-by-case basis, the officials said.

    U.S. officials said that, while they understand U.S. industry will take a hit in the short-term, in the long-run, they believe the policy is essential to protecting national security and the integrity of the U.S.’s nuclear industrial base. They added that they will continue to try to open up other export markets for U.S. firms.

    State Department official Christopher Ashley Ford acknowledged the challenge of balancing national security and economic concerns with regard to nuclear policy in a July speech, noting the U.S. share of the international nuclear energy market has fallen to 20% from 90% over the last 30 years with many believing participation in the Chinese market will be key to the industry’s future viability.

    The hard question, of course, is: To what extent can we pursue such cooperation without providing China with technological tools that will help it achieve its goal of seizing a geopolitical role for itself that displaces U.S. influence?” he said.

    In 2017 the U.S. exported $170 million in nuclear technology to China, officials said. China is one of the few countries making big investments to expand its nuclear-power sector, and nuclear-industry leaders have said the market could eventually be worth billions, government officials said.

    While Westinghouse Electric Co. currently plays the biggest role of U.S.-based nuclear companies in China, the most stringent of the new restrictions doesn’t appear to cover its more traditional style of nuclear reactor. Most of the changes apply to the oncoming generation of nuclear technology that can be miniaturized and is potentially more susceptible to being militarized for power generation at far-flung outposts and for propulsion on watercraft.

    Officials said the Justice Department’s CGN indictment, the 2014 indictment of Chinese military officers for allegedly stealing proprietary information from Westinghouse, along with other intelligence that officials said they were not able to disclose all contributed to the decision to implement the new restrictions.

    Earlier Thursday, before the Energy Department’s announcement of the new nuclear export restrictions, a former Defense Department official highlighted nuclear issues as an overlooked potential flashpoint between the U.S. and China.

    “The level of dialogue between the U.S. and China on nuclear issues is basically nonexistent,” said Abraham Denmark, director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Speaking at a Jamestown Foundation event, Mr. Denmark added that few experts on China have an in-depth knowledge of nuclear issues, and vice versa.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  5. #485
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    Five Eyes intelligence alliance builds coalition to counter China

    BERLIN (Reuters) - The five nations in the world’s leading intelligence-sharing network have been exchanging classified information on China’s foreign activities with other like-minded countries since the start of the year, seven officials in four capitals said.

    The increased cooperation by the Five Eyes alliance - grouping Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States - with countries such as Germany and Japan is a sign of a broadening international front against Chinese influence operations and investments.

    Some of the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the talks, said the enhanced cooperation amounted to an informal expansion of the Five Eyes group on the specific issue of foreign interference.

    While China has been the main focus, discussions have also touched on Russia, several said.

    “Consultations with our allies, with like-minded partners, on how to respond to China’s assertive international strategy have been frequent and are gathering momentum,” a U.S. official told Reuters. “What might have started as ad hoc discussions are now leading to more detailed consultations on best practices and further opportunities for cooperation.”

    All the governments involved, including Germany and Japan, declined to comment.

    China, faced with a growing backlash from Washington, Canberra and other capitals, has rejected accusations that it is seeking to influence foreign governments and that its investments are politically driven.

    The enhanced coordination by the Five Eyes network suggests that, despite signals from U.S. President Donald Trump that he is prepared to go it alone in the confrontation with China, members of his administration are working hard behind the scenes to put together an informal coalition to counter Beijing.

    It also represents another blow to China’s fading hopes of convincing European countries, unsettled by Trump’s “America First” policies, to distance themselves from Washington and move closer to Beijing.

    “BELOW THE RADAR”
    The officials who spoke to Reuters said the talks have been taking place “below the radar” and mainly bilaterally. Two sources said France was also involved, but on a less regular and comprehensive basis.

    None suggested that Germany, Japan or other nations outside the Five Eyes network had been invited to meetings of the intelligence alliance, which was set up after World War Two to counter Soviet influence.

    But a statement issued after a Five Eyes meeting on the Gold Coast of Australia in late August hinted at closer coordination. It said the group would use “global partnerships” and accelerate the sharing of information on foreign interference activities.

    International coordination has accelerated in parallel with a wave of national measures to limit Chinese investments in sensitive technology companies and counter what some governments view as a growing campaign, under President Xi Jinping, to sway foreign governments and societies in China’s favour through a mix of pressure and inducements.

    Last December, citing concerns about Chinese influence, the Australian government unveiled a package of new laws that tightened rules on foreign lobbying and political donations, while broadening the definition of treason and espionage.

    The United States has pushed through a law, known as FIRRMA, which gives Washington new powers to block certain types of foreign investments.

    The text of that legislation mandates Trump to conduct a “more robust international outreach effort” to convince allies to adopt similar protections.

    Earlier this month, in a scathing attack on China’s foreign activities, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence accused Beijing of interfering in the domestic arena by “rewarding or coercing American businesses, movie studios, universities, think tanks, scholars, journalists and local, state and federal officials.” Beijing has denied the charges.

    “A NEW WORLD”
    The German government, which tightened its rules on foreign investments last year only to determine months later, after a fresh wave of Chinese acquisitions, that they were still inadequate, is poised to lower the threshold at which it can intervene.

    Last year, Berlin quietly launched an inter-ministerial drive to assess the broad range of Chinese activities in the country. Government sources say that analysis is broadly complete and new policy measures could follow, although they say far-reaching steps like those taken by Australia are unlikely.

    The U.S. official said the foiled takeover of German semiconductor firm Aixtron in 2016 had underscored the need to build a broader coalition of countries to share information and coordinate responses to China.

    Two years ago, the German government approved a Chinese investment fund’s acquisition of Aixtron, only to reverse course a month later when U.S. officials raised security concerns that Berlin had overlooked.

    The officials who spoke with Reuters described a “flurry of consultations” in recent months, with Washington driving coordination on the investment side and Canberra taking a lead role in raising awareness about political interference.

    Talks have taken place between diplomats, intelligence officials and heads of government, they said.

    “We are living in a new world,” said a person from a Five Eyes country who has travelled extensively to other capitals over the past year to discuss China’s foreign activities.

    “The sudden shock from authoritarian regimes is prompting closer coordination and a real expansion of intelligence sharing,” this person said.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

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