Page 11 of 21 FirstFirst ... 234567891011121314151617181920 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 165 of 307

Thread: US Steel & Aluminum Tariffs

  1. #151
    Global Moderator
    Comrade Commissar
    TopHatter's Avatar
    Join Date
    03 Sep 03
    Posts
    16,238
    This stupid short-sighted son of a bitch is going run the US economy into the ground.

    No wonder that women said that talking to Donald Trump was like talking to a toddler.

    But hey, at least he says he's opposed to abortion.
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor, timid spirits who know neither victory nor defeat ~ Theodore Roosevelt

  2. #152
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,672
    Did you really believe he was "stable genius" and not a narcissistic psycho?


    Name:  DesUtUuV4AA7B6T.jpg large.jpg
Views: 136
Size:  135.2 KB

  3. #153
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Mar 05
    Location
    Panama City Fl
    Posts
    8,802
    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    List of vehicles with at least 75% U.S. parts. A lot of Not "Big 3 " cars n this list

    https://www.cheatsheet.com/automobil...tml/?a=viewall
    A follow up to this. The people that make this list had to change their methodology for the 2017 list. Now instead of American made parts and made in America they add weight to effect on the economy, wages and a whole list of other bullshit.

    Why? Because in 2016 there were only 8 cars that made the list of 75% American content. And only 3 were from US companies. This year if they had used the same standards then only 3 cars would have been on the list. And I doubt that any of them would have been from the Big 3
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

  4. #154
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Mar 05
    Location
    Panama City Fl
    Posts
    8,802
    first shot in the trade war.

    http://www.businessinsider.com/canad...ade-war-2018-6

    The Canadian government announced retaliatory tariffs on US goods that look to go beyond the value of US tariffs on imports of Canadian steel and aluminum.

    Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland announced the responsive measures to President Donald Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum from the US's northern neighbor.

    Freeland and the Canadian government pegged the total value of the goods subject to the Canadian tariffs at 16.6 billion Canadian dollars, or roughly $12.8 billion US dollars. Those values are roughly equal to that of the Canadian steel and aluminum exports to the US.

    "In response to these measures, Canada intends to impose surtaxes or similar trade-restrictive countermeasures against up to C$16.6 billion in imports of steel, aluminum, and other products from the US, representing the value of 2017 Canadian exports affected by the US measures," Canada's government wrote on its official website.

    A spokesperson for the Canada's Global Affairs office also confirmed to Business Insider that the target was to place tariffs on 16.6 billion Canadian dollars.

    But after totaling the value of Canada's list of US goods subject to tariffs using import data, Business Insider found that the value of these exports is equal to roughly just over $15 billion US dollars, or 19 billion Canadian dollars.

    The spokesperson said the government stands by its analysis that the total value of the goods subject to tariffs is 16.6 billion Canadian dollars.

    Business Insider used 2017 import data from Canadian statistics agency StatsCan and the Harmonized System code for each product on the tariff list. The Harmonized System contains a unique code for a product to distinguish it from other materials and is used to standardize the identification of goods moving through the international trade system.

    Another analysis, using the US Census Bureau, would paint the retaliatory measures as even more severe. Based on an analysis of US export data, the value of the goods subject to tariffs was $15.72 billion, well above the target level.

    While the tariffs being higher than expected could certainly have ramifications for US businesses, experts say they would be permitted under international law.

    Canada argued that the retaliatory tariffs on US goods were legal under World Trade Organization rules since they were equivalent to what they viewed as an improper US action. Debbie Shon, a partner at the law firm Quinn Emanuel and a former official in the US Trade Representative's office under President Bill Clinton, told Business Insider that the exact value of the tariffs doesn't have to be exactly the same.

    "It doesn't have to be exactly the same, dollar for dollar," Shon said. "The other country just has to show that the response was commensurate to the original action."
    Here is the list

    https://www.fin.gc.ca/activty/consul...cmpcaa-eng.asp

    Way to go Team Trump MAGA (Morons Are Governing America)
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

  5. #155
    Administrator
    Lei Feng Protege
    Defense Professional
    Join Date
    23 Aug 05
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    13,521
    This stupid short-sighted son of a bitch is going run the US economy into the ground.
    the sole "consolation" to this is that the countries on the other side of this aren't stupid; they're counter-targeting US exports largely from states that went for Trump.

    you get what you vote for.
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

  6. #156
    Senior Contributor antimony's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Feb 08
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    4,088
    Quote Originally Posted by TopHatter View Post
    This stupid short-sighted son of a bitch is going run the US economy into the ground.

    No wonder that women said that talking to Donald Trump was like talking to a toddler.

    But hey, at least he says he's opposed to abortion.
    This is the Presidency the US voters wanted, they should get what they voted for
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" ~ Epicurus

  7. #157
    Senior Contributor Bigfella's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jan 07
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    9,421
    I don't know much about trade wars, or six dimensional chess, so maybe the wise folks here can help me.

    Is slapping tariffs on your allies some brilliant tactic to scare your enemies into doing what you want by showing how ruthless you are, or is this whole thing as monumentally stupid as it looks?

    I'm just glad he didn't move a Churchill bust or hold a cup of coffee getting off Air Force One, otherwise we'd be swamped with angry conservatives.


    Win nervously lose tragically - Reds C C

  8. #158
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,672
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfella View Post
    Is slapping tariffs on your allies some brilliant tactic to scare your enemies into doing what you want by showing how ruthless you are, or is this whole thing as monumentally stupid as it looks?
    I am no 'economic expert'; did 'the Greats' (Classics and Philosophy) as my first degree which bumped me into the Vienna lot (via logical empiricism) through to Wittgenstein and Popper etc which also introduced me to Hayek having already read Adam Smith and Karl Marx just because they were famous. It just strikes me as stupid - as a matter of common sense - to treat ones friends the same way you treat your enemies.

    From what I understand of the economics all trade is mutually beneficial; making your trade partners less wealthy is not beneficial as they have less money to spend on the things you are selling them. Also by imposing trade tariffs on your friends you risk diplomatic relations and possibly even military alliances already in place. This also is true regarding the Brexit idiocy.

    From my point of view at present it is dangerous. The US rightfully opposes North Stream 2 but by starting a trade war with Europe encourages Germany to look toward Muscovy to look for a new Molotov - Ribbentrop Pact that would signal war again in Europe.

  9. #159
    Administrator
    Lei Feng Protege
    Defense Professional
    Join Date
    23 Aug 05
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    13,521
    BF,

    I don't know much about trade wars, or six dimensional chess, so maybe the wise folks here can help me.

    Is slapping tariffs on your allies some brilliant tactic to scare your enemies into doing what you want by showing how ruthless you are, or is this whole thing as monumentally stupid as it looks?

    I'm just glad he didn't move a Churchill bust or hold a cup of coffee getting off Air Force One, otherwise we'd be swamped with angry conservatives.
    this all stems from Trump's outlook: there's no such thing as a mutually beneficial relationship, because for him all relationships can be characterized as doing the conning-getting conned.

    alliance-bonds of blood mean nothing to him. in fact, he views it as convenient leverage to extract economic concessions-- under the justification that he views US allies as having taken advantage of the US for decades.

    that's why in this round of trade wars, he's treated US allies not just the same, but WORSE, than competitors like China.
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

  10. #160
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    14 Mar 08
    Posts
    2,006
    And it doesn't help that he's being surrounded by bona fide lunatics like Peter Navarro, who doesn't seem to understand that we Americans run a trade deficit because...

    We don't save enough, and not because of some millenia old nebulous Sino-EU-Muslim Brotherhood-Zionist-Illuminati-Reptoid conspiracy.

  11. #161
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,746
    Quote Originally Posted by Bigfella View Post
    I don't know much about trade wars, or six dimensional chess, so maybe the wise folks here can help me.

    Is slapping tariffs on your allies some brilliant tactic to scare your enemies into doing what you want by showing how ruthless you are, or is this whole thing as monumentally stupid as it looks?

    I'm just glad he didn't move a Churchill bust or hold a cup of coffee getting off Air Force One, otherwise we'd be swamped with angry conservatives.
    I’m going to go with monumentally stupid, simply because of who gets hurt the most: Americans. Today’s paper has a story about a fuel cell company in New York that’s halted expansion because of import duties on key materials, as well as what are hinted at as being deliberate delays in processing imports by US Customs. Next week, the journalists might get to that guy we all know who was going to put solar panels on the roof, but now it’s so expensive that the pay-back doesn’t makes sense.

    You treat your allies well because they’re the ones who stand with you in times of need. You help your allies' economies, even at the expense of your own (Hello, General Marshall!), because it’s easier to help you out than to bail you out. Having weak or ailing allies isn’t a good strategy.

    And, sometimes you have to be careful about who's really dependent on whom ...

    Selected US imports from China (2017)
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Item_ _ _ _ _ Share from China (%)_ _ _ Import value ($ mn)
    Toys, games, sporting goods_ _ _ _ _ 74.3_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $26,773
    Cookware, cutlery_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 71.8_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $7,161
    Cell phones_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 66.1_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $70,394
    Computers_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 66.0_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ $45,520
    Stereo equipment_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _62.9_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $3,737
    Glassware, chinaware_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _62.4_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,537
    Footwear_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _61.8_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $11,537
    Furniture, household goods_ _ _ _ _ _56.2_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $20,667
    Nontextile household apparel_ _ _ _ _ 53.7_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $4,955
    Computer accessories_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 53.2_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $31,612
    Glass plate and sheet_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 52.4_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,013
    Nontextile floor tiles_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 51.5_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $2,489
    Sum of the above_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $227,395

    Total US imports_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 100.0_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $2,342,905
    From China_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 21.6%_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _$505,597

    Selected US exports to China, 2017
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Item_ _ _ _ Share to China (%)_ _ Import value ($ mn)
    Sorghum, barley, oats_ _ _ _ _ 74.6_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,121
    Soybeans_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 55.3_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $22,354
    Hides and skins_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 49.9_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,920
    Logs and timber_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 45.0_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $7,061
    Pulpwood and woodpulp_ _ _ _ 38.0_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $8,926
    Copper_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 36.5_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $6,163
    Leather and furs_ _ _ _ __ _ _ 22.6_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $232
    Crude oil_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _20.5_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $4,434
    Passenger cars_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 20.0_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $10,526
    Aluminum and alumina_ _ _ _ _ 17.2_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,323
    Raw cotton_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 16.7_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $976
    Laboratory testing instruments_15.9_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,828
    Sum of the above_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $42,327

    Total US exports_ _ _ _ _ _ _ 100.0_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $1,546,732
    To China_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ 8.4_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $130,370
    Last edited by DOR; 05 Jun 18, at 08:01.
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  12. #162
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Aug 03
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    11,655
    Full article: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-44366737

    Billionaire Koch brothers take on Trump over tariffs

    Powerful US billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch are funding a multi-million dollar campaign against President Donald Trump's trade tariffs.

    Three political groups backed by the brothers say they will use advertising, lobbying and grassroots campaigns to push the benefits of free trade.

    The duo run Koch Industries, one of the world's largest privately-owned firms.

    The move comes just days after Mr Trump imposed tariffs on steel and aluminium imports from the EU, Canada and Mexico.

    On Tuesday, the company was told that David Koch, 78, was stepping down from the company due to his deteriorating health.

    In a letter, Charles Koch told employees he was "deeply saddened" about his brother's departure, adding that "David has always been a fighter and is dealing with this challenge in the same way".

    Charles and David Koch's company - the second largest privately owned business in the US - has interests ranging from pipelines to paper towels.

    According to the Koch Industries website, "to millions of Americans, the words 'Koch brothers' and 'political activism' go hand-in-hand".

    They have previously put money into groups denying climate change and attacking unions and workers' rights, but they have also pushed criminal justice reform and made large donations to the American Civil Liberties Union.

    Last November, the brothers helped fund Meredith Corporation's deal to buy US magazine publisher Time Inc, which owns of some of the world's most famous magazine brands, sparking concerns that they would use their investment to wield editorial influence.

    The three groups launching the campaign: Freedom Partners Chamber of Commerce, Americans for Prosperity and the LIBRE Initiative, are urging the president to lift the recent tariffs on aluminium and steel imports as well as the proposed tariffs on other imports from China.
    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

  13. #163
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    01 Nov 09
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    3,431
    Just before the G7 meeting (Trudeau in charge which should be fun) Trump apparently gives his friend, Macron, the full attack dog routine on a phone call. I guess the book on how to win friends and influence people was never part of his reading list. So I assume this means it is really a G6 meeting with this skunk tagging along.

    https://www.cnn.com/2018/06/04/opini...man/index.html

    Donald Trump may have just torched his last real friend in the Western alliance, someone he could have counted on when the going gets tough. In what was supposed to be a frank exchange of views, French President Emmanuel Macron apparently got the full Trump treatment the other day when he tried in a phone call to level with the one world leader who does not support being leveled with, even coming from his closest confidants.

    And with a succession of battles looming on the trade front, on Iran's nuclear future, on migration and climate change, not to mention a dicey North Korean summit in Singapore, Trump needs all the friends he can get. Now, Trump seems to be flying entirely solo, as Macron, long an apparently reliable wingman, peels off, reaching a long-awaited, though not unexpected, reconciliation with his principal challenger for European leadership -- German chancellor Angela Merkel.


    Defaulting to confrontation and pique seems to be how two sources familiar with the recent telephone call between Trump and Macron described it to CNN. How is this even possible? What other president could possibly have reacted in this manner to frank criticism from an ally and called it a "win?"

    The saddest part of all is that Trump apparently failed to even comprehend the context. Macron and Merkel, who herself has had a pretty frosty relationship with Trump, have been getting decidedly chummy themselves recently.....
    Last edited by tbm3fan; 05 Jun 18, at 18:32.

  14. #164
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    05 Sep 06
    Posts
    4,271
    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    So I assume this means it is really a G6 meeting with this skunk tagging along.
    The French Finance Minister already calls it "G6 plus one" anyway. Which as a term is actually Canadian, so quite fitting: "G7 plus one" was used by Harper to refer to the ostracization of Russia from the previous G8 in 2013 - the year before Russia was then formally excluded.

  15. #165
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Mar 05
    Location
    Panama City Fl
    Posts
    8,802
    And now Mexico replies

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...605-story.html

    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico put tariffs on American products ranging from steel to pork and bourbon on Tuesday, retaliating against import duties on metals imposed by President Donald Trump and taking aim at Republican strongholds ahead of U.S. congressional elections in November.

    Mexico's response further raises trade tensions between the two countries and adds a new complication to efforts to renegotiate the trillion-dollar North American Free Trade Agreement between Canada, the United States and Mexico.

    American pork producers, for whom Mexico is the largest export market, were dismayed by the move.

    Trump last week rattled some of the United States' closest allies by removing an exemption to tariffs on imported steel and aluminium that his administration had granted to Mexico, Canada and the European Union.

    Meanwhile, Trump economic advisor Larry Kudlow revived the possibility on Tuesday that the president will seek to replace NAFTA with bilateral deals with Canada and Mexico, something both countries say they oppose.

    Following news of the new Mexican tariffs, which take effect immediately, the peso (MXN=)(MXN=D2) tumbled to its weakest level since February 2017, making it one of the worst performers among major currencies.

    Mexico's retaliatory list, published in the government's official gazette, included a 20 percent tariff on U.S. pork legs and shoulders, apples and potatoes and 20 to 25 percent duties on types of cheeses and bourbon.

    A net importer of U.S. steel, Mexico is also putting 25 percent duties on a range of American steel products.

    Mexico’s trade negotiators designed the list, in part, to include products exported by top Republican leaders' states, including Indiana, where Vice President Mike Pence was formerly governor, according to a trade source familiar with the matter. Bourbon-producing Kentucky is the home state of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican.

    The new tariffs could also have political implications in some hotly contested races as the Republicans seek to maintain control of both chambers in Congress in November's election, illustrating the potential perils of Trump's aggressive efforts to set right what he sees as unfair trade balances with allies and rivals.




    MIDWESTERN WORRIES

    Iowa, where one incumbent Republican representative, Rod Blum, is seen as vulnerable, is an example of a place where Trump's party could be hurt. The state is the top pork-producing state in the United States and Mexico is its main export market by volume.



    “We need trade and one of the things we’re concerned about is long-term implications that these trade issues will have on our partnerships with Mexico and Canada and other markets,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig, a Republican.

    “If our customers around the world start going to other parts of the world for their supplies, that is a serious problem,” he said.

    Chicago Mercantile Exchange hog futures (LHc1) at one point fell more than 2 percent following the Mexico pork tariff announcement.

    “It certainly casts a negative pall over the market," said CME livestock futures trader Dan Norcini.



    The president of the U.S. National Pork Producers Council, Jim Heimerl, said Mexico accounted for nearly 25 percent of all pork shipments last year, adding that "a 20 percent tariff eliminates our ability to compete effectively in Mexico."

    "This is devastating to my family and pork-producing families across the United States," said Heimerl, a pork producer from Johnstown, Ohio.

    In Minnesota, about 14 percent of the state’s $7.1 billion of annual agricultural exports goes to Mexico, one of the state’s top export markets, said Matthew Wohlman, Minnesota Department of Agriculture deputy commissioner.

    The Mexican tariffs will hit its pork, dairy and potato exports, Minnesota state officials said.

    U.S. Senator Mark Warner, a Democrat from Virginia, called the new tariffs a "gut punch" to farmers in his state, who he said exported more than $68 million in pork to Mexico last year.

    "The President’s trade war is going to cost Virginia ag jobs," he wrote in a tweet.



    AMERICA FIRST

    Mexico announced its response to Trump's move last week but it did not provide details of tariff levels or a full list of products at the time.

    The United States and Mexico do $600 billion in annual trade and about 16 percent of U.S. goods exports go to its southern neighbour. However, the Mexican economy relies more on trade than does the U.S. economy, with about 80 percent of its exports sold to America.

    The trade fights with Mexico and Canada are part of the Trump administration's "America First" economic agenda, which has also put Washington on a collision course with China over trade.

    Washington and Beijing have threatened tit-for-tat tariffs on goods worth up to $150 billion (112 billion) each, as Trump has pushed Beijing to open its economy further and address the United States' large trade deficit with China.

    The United States imposed tariffs of 25 percent on imported steel and 10 percent on aluminium in March, citing national security grounds. Last week Washington said it was ending a two-month exemption it had granted to imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union.

    The dispute with Mexico over tariffs makes it more difficult to conclude talks on renegotiating NAFTA between the three countries, discussions that began last year because Trump said the deal needed to be reworked to better serve the United States. Canada has also strongly objected to the metals tariffs.

    The U.S. side has linked lifting its tariffs to a successful outcome of the NAFTA negotiations.



    White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said Trump was still looking at the possibility of doing individual trade deals with Canada and Mexico in place of NAFTA.

    "He's looking at the best way to make sure he gets the best deal possible for American workers and whether or not that's through NAFTA or other means, those options are on the table," Sanders told a news briefing.

    Separately, Mexico took steps on Tuesday to make it more attractive for other countries to send it pork by opening a tariff-free quota for some pork imports. Economy Minister Ildefonso Guajardo said his country would now "surely" look to Europe for pork products, used in many traditional dishes in Mexico.
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 24 users browsing this thread. (1 members and 23 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Review: Man of Steel
    By gunnut in forum Movie & TV Room
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12 Jul 13,, 10:15
  2. This Guy Has Balls of Steel
    By Bigfella in forum World Affairs Board Pub
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 07 Jul 09,, 01:37
  3. Mexico slaps tariffs on U.S. goods in truck feud
    By Donnie in forum International Economy
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 18 Mar 09,, 19:46
  4. U.S airforce using transparent aluminum?
    By canoe in forum Military Aviation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21 Oct 05,, 03:58
  5. EU scores steel victory over US
    By Ironduke in forum International Economy
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11 Nov 03,, 20:15

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •