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Thread: Stone pelting a conspiracy by Pakistan and its agents in Kashmir

  1. #286
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Pakistan’s options in Kashmir

    Imran Khan was in a celebratory mood after his successful visit to Washington. He seemed to have impressed the hard-to-please American President. In a joint press conference after the conclusion of their long Oval Office meeting, Donald Trump offered his services as a mediator for the unresolved issue of Kashmir. He said that Narendra Modi, the Indian Prime Minister, had asked him to intervene. A surprised India quickly rejected the notion that after having resisted third-party involvement in the dispute, it was now prepared to accept America’s good offices. Some analysts have suggested that India’s August 5th move to fully integrate Kashmir into the Indian Union was being planned but the Trump offer may have hastened the Indian action.

    You have time on your side,” a senior Chinese official once told me when I was the director of the World Bank’s China Operations Department. I held that position for well over seven years, from 1987 to 1994. In 1989 I steered the World Bank through what Beijing called the “Tiananmen incident”. Most of the world – certainly the United States – did not buy that description of an event that brought the Chinese army to the storied gathering place in the centre of the country’s capital. The army cleared Tiananmen of the protesters who had occupied the square for weeks. Hundreds of people were killed in the military action. The fact that I refused to buckle under the American pressure exerted on me by the officials of the administration headed by president George H W Bush brought me close to the senior leaders of China. I had discussions with them on several issues including the future of Kashmir. The quote with which I began this article was with reference to Kashmir and had a suggestion on how Pakistan should handle itself in this long-enduring dispute with India over the state of Kashmir.

    The Chinese senior official in saying that time was on Pakistan’s side took a cue from his country’s history, particularly the way Beijing had handled the issue of Taiwan. In fact, before moving to take over the China department, I was the director of the International Relations Department responsible for the World Bank’s dealing with global institutions and matters not directly related to the institution’s country operations. The Bank then had begun to publish what was called the World Development Report in which it listed Taiwan as a separate country. The Chinese objected and I worked out an arrangement in which Taiwan was referred to as “Taiwan, China”. That way the Bank could include data about Taiwan in the list of economic entities on which it reported while China was satisfied that an important institution such as the World Bank was not unilaterally changing the status of Taiwan with respect to China.

    Taiwan will become a part of China,” the official continued. “Taiwan will never be an independent country. It will become part of China. That’s what it was for thousands of years and will get back into that position for thousands of years. Time is on our side; it may take five years, ten years, fifty years, a 100 years.” He felt that Kashmir was in a similar situation. It is an anomaly. It cannot be the only Muslim majority state in a predominantly Hindu India. “Kashmir will come to Pakistan for that is where it belongs. Time is on Pakistan’s side,” said the official.

    The Hindu extremists who now have a dominant position in the incumbent Indian government do not realise the truth in the Chinese view. That is why they have taken the step they did on August 5 and removed the special status Kashmir had been promised and granted in 1947 when it persuaded the state’s Hindu raja to accede to India. An important component of that original contract was the ban on the acquisition of property by non-Kashmiris in Kashmir. With that provision gone, we are likely to see the repeat of the Palestinian situation in Kashmir. In the 1940’s, the Zionist movement got tens of thousands of moneyed Jews from Europe to come to Palestine and buy homes and lands from the Arabs. The Palestinians lost their overwhelming presence in the part of the geographic space that became the Jewish state of Israel. The Indians hope to repeat the Palestinian history in Kashmir. Will they succeed?

    The answer is no, since the Kashmiri resistance to Indian rule has entered a new phase. In the first phase, some of the Kashmiri elite sided with India and were given senior political positions in the state’s government. That did not win the favour of the younger people in the territory. The second phase involved Pakistan’s direct involvement when it sent the seasoned, battle-hardened mujahideen who had pushed the Soviet Union out of Afghanistan. The authorities in Pakistan facilitated their move into Kashmir. India responded by militarising the region. With an estimated 650,000 to 700,000 men from the country’s armed forces in the state, Kashmir is the most militarised place on earth. Kashmir is now an occupied territory.

    The third phase began on August 5 when Narendra Modi, his close associates and the BJP brought their program of “Hindunising” India. Several years ago Sunil Khilani, an Indian historian, had written a powerful book titled The Idea of India. He had concluded that India had created a powerful nation out of extreme diversity. This was done by establishing institutions that gave space to people who followed different religions, spoke different languages and belonged to different castes. Modi, encouraged by his electoral triumph in May of this year, has walked away from that idea of India. The RSS, the extremist Hindu organisation from the ranks of which Modi rose, does not subscribe to that idea of India. The followers of this non-inclusive organisation do not admit women, have no interest in working with the members of lower castes, and are hostile to Muslims. Amit Shah, the India Home Minister and the person closest to the Indian Prime Minister, once called Muslims “termites, eating away at the structure of Hindu India”. The move on Kashmir is aimed at ridding the termite infestation.

    Notwithstanding, the Pakistani responses by reducing its diplomatic presence in India and by calling on several world leaders to work on India to reverse the actions it has taken are not likely to work and bring about a change of heart in New Delhi. What will work is the growing realisation on the part of the growing segment of the Indian population that the real termite is the move to create a Hindu nation out of India’s diversity. Modi is moving India towards its demise. Time is not on India’s side.
    I don't see Taiwan has become a part of China, nor do I see Kashmir in any way becoming a part of Pakistan. With FP analysts such as these, who propagate their army's narrative to keep abduls in high spirits, they lost Bangladesh in 1971, and even when the Pakistan Army was losing the war, their narrative was they were winning. When will Pakistan Army finally, for Allah's sake win a war? Ever? Disband the useless army that butchers its own citizens. What good is it anyway, eating up lion's share of development money which Pakistan hardly can afford, and have to beg every year from its patrons.
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  2. #287
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    Ayesha Siddiqa: Pak Army Doesn't Know How To Respond To India



    PA caught with its pants down on India's Art 370 revocation and they know they cannot fight the IA. Abduls also know PA can't win against the IA. Etcetera.

    High alert in Madhya Pradesh over possible presence of Afghan terrorists

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    Pakistanis themselves will destroy their country. We don't have to do anything.

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    Sorry, Mia Khalifa!

    Blacklisting Pakistan absolutely a possibility: FATF president

    Will believe it, when I see it.
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    Last edited by Oracle; 20 Aug 19, at 03:39.
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    Some fun!
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    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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  5. #290
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    Tilting at More than Windmills in South Asia - Richard N. Haass
    A turn toward Pakistan and away from India, as well as a race for the exits from Afghanistan, would be unwise.

    “Tilt” is a word with a history in South Asia. Nearly a half-century ago, Pakistan’s government brutally repressed its citizens in the eastern part of the country. Millions of refugees streamed into India, which mobilized its armed forces. Pakistan attacked, and India responded. Full-scale war ensued. When the dust settled, Pakistan had been dismembered, with its eastern part becoming the independent country of Bangladesh.

    The US government watched these events unfold with concern. India’s claim to be non-aligned was not taken seriously, and President Richard Nixon and National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger judged victory for India to be a gain for the Soviet Union. In addition, the South Asia conflict occurred just as the United States (with Pakistan’s assistance) was seeking to establish a relationship with the People’s Republic of China. Nixon and Kissinger feared that China’s interest would diminish if the US appeared unwilling to stand up to India, a country backed by the Soviets and one with whom China had fought a war a decade before.

    The US dispatched an aircraft carrier to the Bay of Bengal, ostensibly to deter further Indian military action, but in fact more as a signal of American support for Pakistan. The show of force did not change the trajectory of the crisis, but the US decision to tilt toward Pakistan (a phrase that made its way into newspapers) was infamous in India for decades to come.

    The US continued to favor Pakistan in the wake of the 1971 war. Pakistan was a close US partner in the effort to raise the costs to the Soviet Union of its occupation of Afghanistan, teaming up with the Americans to arm the local Afghan opposition. But with the end of the Soviet military presence in Afghanistan in February 1989 – and the end of the Cold War just months later – the US chose to reconsider its stance toward both India and Pakistan.

    Successive US presidents sought improved ties with India, owing to India’s growing economy, robust democracy, and the increasing importance of the Indian-American community. More recently, India has come to be perceived in some quarters as a potential partner in balancing a rising China. At the same time, US relations with Pakistan deteriorated, initially over its nuclear program, but, after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, also because of its ties to the Taliban and other extremists.

    Now, the question is whether thinking in Washington, DC, is again evolving and the US is considering another “tilt.” After nearly two decades of sacrifice, the US is looking for a way out of Afghanistan, and Pakistan, which has provided a sanctuary to the Taliban, is seen as critical to America’s ability to withdraw its troops without enabling the group to overthrow the Afghan government. At the same time, there is frustration with India over its trade policies.

    The new tilt was manifested weeks ago when Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan visited the White House. US President Donald Trump made the stunning declaration that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi had asked him to mediate the Kashmir dispute, the most sensitive issue dividing India and Pakistan since partition and independence in 1947.

    Such a request by India would represent a fundamental shift in its policy, and India’s government was quick to deny that such a request had been made. This was followed by India’s announcement that it planned to strip much of this Muslim-majority region’s autonomy. There is a possibility that Pakistan will respond by renewing its support for terrorism, which could lead to another war between Pakistan and India, two nuclear-armed countries.

    Against this backdrop, the US would be unwise to turn to Pakistan as a strategic partner. Pakistan sees a friendly government in Kabul as vital to its security and competition with arch-rival India. There is little reason to believe that the military and intelligence services, which continue to run Pakistan, will rein in the Taliban or rule out terrorism.

    Equally, the US would be unwise to alienate India. Yes, India has a tradition of protectionist trade policies and often frustrates US policymakers with its reluctance to cooperate fully on strategic issues. But democratic India, which will soon surpass China as the world’s most populous country and will boast the world’s fifth-largest economy, is a good long-term bet. It is a natural partner to help balance China. India has rejected participation in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, whereas Pakistan, struggling economically, has embraced it.

    The US would also be unwise to race for the exits from Afghanistan. Peace talks with the Taliban mostly look like a means to extract US forces from the country. The process is reminiscent of Vietnam, where a 1973 agreement between the US and North Vietnam provided a pretext for US withdrawal from the South but not a basis for peace. The notion of a coalition government, with power shared by the current government and the Taliban, is optimistic at best, fanciful at worst.

    Instead of embracing fantasy, the US should continue to keep a modest number of troops in Afghanistan to ensure the government survives and the country does not again become a terrorist haven. What is required is an endurance strategy, not an exit strategy, based on local conditions, not political calendars. As has long been the case, South Asia is at best a region to be managed, not a problem to be solved.
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  6. #291
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Serving the global jihad: This is what Khalistanis supporting Pakistan are doing. And it is a betrayal of Sikhs
    Hindus and Sikhs have their issues. But this is nothing compared to the brutality Sikhs faced from the Muslim League which pushed them out of Pakistan. To side with them is a huge betrayal.

    A day ago, I saw on Facebook a picture from outside the Indian consulate in Toronto, Canada. It showed small flags bearing the Sikh symbol, along with the word ‘Khalistan’ — dwarfed by a giant Pakistani flag in the middle of the frame.

    I was moved to declare on Facebook that these Khalistanis were traitors to Sikhism and the servants of Jihad.

    A concerned user with a Hindu name asked, "But what about justice for the Sikhs who were ruthlessly massacred in cold blood?"

    I had to respond.

    There is a history between the Sikhs and Hindus, involving Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi and the Arya Samaj, that has to be faced and worked out.

    But an alliance with Pakistan — well, what about justice for the Sikhs who were massacred in cold blood in 1947?

    Did the Sikhs ask for Pakistan?

    Did anyone ask them what they wanted?

    No.

    But they accepted what happened — without hate or hostility towards either Muslims or Hindus.

    My family in West Punjab had no intention of moving to India. They were at peace and harmony with their Muslim neighbours. Punjabi Muslims had been with the Unionist Party. No one cared for Jinnah in Punjab. The Muslim League was nothing in Punjab. In 1946, when the Muslim League mobilised all its forces, including Ahmedis and communists from across India, to deliver a victory for the Muslim League in Punjab, my family members thought nothing of it. When they learned of Partition too, it didn't mean a lot. What did the Hindus of, say, Agra or Nagpur mean to them in front of their own known neighbours?

    Then, the slaughter started.

    Still, my family didn't leave. In fact, they didn't leave until it was too late.

    They were then going to die. But they were lucky. They were evacuated by an army officer with some trucks who was gathering whoever he could.

    Virtually no one in the area, except a few, got out before their defences failed, before they ran out of ammunition, before they were run over by mobs of their neighbours out to rape and kill. Those who made it ended up in the destitution and poverty of the refugee camps, scattered across a foreign land.

    I don't think anyone, except Kashmiri Pandits, can imagine what I am describing.

    There was only one place for us Pakistani Sikhs to go. India. And, that's where we went.

    And, after years in refugee camps, we settled in Haryana, not far from Delhi. Hindus working in the bureaucracy of newly independent India slowly got us settled in the cities and farms, with plots of land to build houses and start agriculture.

    The trader Khatris, Hindus and Sikhs, filled the cities, the farming Jats and Majbis went to the villages, and over a generation, became a part of the country that was their home.

    We had loved our Muslim neighbours.

    We didn't want Partition.

    But the Muslim League brought hell to Punjab, set fire to the love between the Muslim and the other, and literally burned us to the ground.

    We grew again as seeds in the soil of an India that we had never seen. We farmed, we joined the army, the civil service, politics, we did all our duties with honour, honesty and dharmic devotion to our work.

    But our family was scattered. We don’t know where anyone was, where they went, who survived and what became of them.

    My great-grandfather was one of seven brothers.

    We have no idea what happened to the families of six of them.

    We have no family, no community, no relations, no baradari, other than those who escaped in the truck together that night in 1947.

    This was brought to us by the Muslim League and those who voted for the Muslim League. It was brought to us by Jinnah, the Qaid-e-Azam of Pakistan.

    And now, we have to watch the Sikh Nishan in the same frame as the star and crescent of the sons of Jinnah, whose Jihad against Hind has still not ended.

    Is this what Guru Hargobind called the bhakti Sikhs to bear arms for? Is this what Guru Tegh Bahadur gave his life, but not his faith, to Aurangzeb for? Is this what Guru Gobind Singh wanted, when he wrote the Zafarnama to Aurangzeb? Is this what Guru Arjun Dev and the Char Sahibzadas gave their lives for? Is this justice to the deeds of Sardar Banda Singh Bahadur? Is this for the valour and glory of Maharaja Ranjit Singh?

    Is this what Shaheed Udham Singh and Shaheed Bhagat Singh wanted?

    Is this what India deserves from us — after having given us new homes, new lives, security and prosperity, after we, the Sikhs, were subjected to the latest in a string of genocides we endured at the hands of Muslim rulers since the days of Guru Arjun Dev and Jahangir?

    No.


    My deceased grandfather of the Punjab regiment says "no". The Boys of the Sikh Regiment say "no". Baba Farid and Baba Bulley Shah say "no".

    Whatever Hindus and Sikhs have to work out has to be worked out.

    But Sikhs in alliance with the Ghazwa-e-Hind, the Jihad being waged upon Hindustan?

    I don't see Khalistanis as Sikhs. Just turbans and long beards cannot make them Sikhs. They are only ignorant, hate-filled servants of the global Jihad.
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  7. #292
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Eye opening

    India needs tips from Israel on how to handle Kashmir. Blocking network is not one of them | The Print | Aug 19 2019

    How did the Israelis deal with the Second Intifada and abort the Third Intifada even before it started.

    The Second Intifada was a period of great violence between Israelis and Palestinians. The Israeli reaction to the Second Intifada (2000 -2005) was exactly how India has acted in Kashmir — curfews to prevent mass gatherings, communications blackouts to prevent organisation of gatherings, shutting down of schools and workplaces to prevent it being used as a ruse for gatherings, and the use of pellet guns and teargas to disperse violent gatherings. Note the common factor in all four actions is ‘gatherings’ — with everything being geared to just prevent these, but causing enormous public hardship and bloating the ranks of miscreants.

    Now move on to the Third Intifada (2014 onwards). Have you ever heard of it? No. Guess why the so-called silent intifada never took off? Because the Israelis learnt to get in before gatherings happened and, in doing so, avoided inconveniencing the Palestinian population as a whole. The root of this was not cutting down on communications but allowing communications to flow freely.
    Follow the money | ORF | Jul 08 2019

    Things had become so bizarre in Kashmir that much of the anti-India propaganda was actually being funded by the state and central government!

    In no other country of the world does this kind of a thing happen, and yet in Kashmir the most rabid anti-India newspapers, columnists, journalists were surviving on the largesse bestowed on them by the government in Srinagar and Delhi.
    : O

    Given the level of ‘intelligence’ (the pun is entirely intended) that has been displayed in financing the very people who were India’s biggest enemies, it is no surprise that the spooks also took their eye off the ball when it came to allowing Kashmiris to go and study in Pakistan, or letting the Turks play proxy for Pakistan by permitting Istanbul to become a meeting point for Kashmiri youth who were seduced with fellowships and offered all sorts of other blandishments. And then there were the ‘princelings’ – the kids of terrorists and separatists who were mollycoddled and facilitated into government jobs, given admissions in engineering and medical colleges, allowed to travel and study abroad. No one ever asked where the money came from for the assets they created, or how these characters were able to afford their lavish lifestyles without having done a single day of honest work. As if this were not enough, Delhi in its infinite wisdom (or the lack of it) opened cross-LoC trade which then became a conduit for funding terrorism and smuggling narcotics.

    Hopefully, all this could now be ending. The NIA raids have had a salutary effect, but a lot more needs to be done to shut down the funding networks and penalise and reduce to penury of the conflict entrepreneurs. If the speech of Home Minister Amit Shah is anything to go by, then it seems that gloves are coming off and the authorities will follow the money and dismantle the terror industry that has been flourishing for decades in Kashmir. This more than anything else will help in restoring normalcy in the troubled state.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 20 Aug 19, at 14:35.

  8. #293
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    ^ In the 90s when Pakistan sponsored terrorism was at its peak, agencies made attempts to wean away some from Pakistan sponsored terrorism. We know them as Ikhwans. Surrendered terrorists who were well versed with what the Pakistan Army wanted. What did we do with them? We confiscated their weapons, left them to the mercy of the Pakistani terrorists. I have talked about this earlier. Many Ikhwans were killed, some lay low, but when found out were killed in broad daylight. Look back at the history of the JKLF. India failed Kashmiris.

    A terrorists is killed by our security forces, and we allow processions and open funeral, which is attended by other terrorists, which then becomes ground zero for recruitment. What did the USA do with the piglet Osama’s body? They fed it to the fishes. The very first time a congregation of terrorists took place during another terrorists journey to hell, we should have used snipers and killed all those piglet terrorists who were at the scene. But we didn’t.

    Open processions for a terrorist? Were a fcuking weak state. Like the red wedding, once, just once had we started bloodbath during those funerals, those Pakistani piglets wouldn’t have dared anything ever else. And I am not talking about killing innocent Kashmiris, lest the left wing crowd here accuse me of being a Nazi, racist and fascist. I always talk about terrorists. My hate for terrorism goes beyond being emotional for the causes of sovereignty of the state, it’s damn personal too. I've seen it from up, close and from being personal.

    Many Kashmiri Pandits were killed, raped. Half a million Kashmiri Pandits were kicked out from Kashmir. What did we do? Nothing. The coming generations will not forgive us for what we have done. India stood silently as Pakistan committed mass murder again and again. Now when the Modi Government is trying to correct historical blunders, some among us call the PM Hitler, BJP as a Nazi party. Yeah right. Call us what you want, if Pakistan doesn't mend its ways (seems unlikely), IAs' jackboots will be up their throats in the future. Complete disintegration of Pakistan is in this world's interests. Anyone saying otherwise has their heads stuck up in their ass, or are not politically savvy enough to understand geo-politics.

    Last edited by Oracle; 20 Aug 19, at 17:53.
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    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Putin is a sell-out, Britain is a no-Fcuking-body, China is an adversary. I don't understand India's FP sometimes. Why don't we strengthen our relations with the US and France on a war footing. Why don't we openly embrace the Indo-Pacific and the Quad. Why don't we talk about concentration camps in Xinjiang. Why do we keep buying defense equipments from Russia, when they hobnob with Pakistan and China. This Nehruvian-Indi-F-A-G ideology of being good with everybody has kept us down. We don't have to be good with everybody. We need to make our choices and work on it.

    Is anyone in the BJP listening? There's no prize in being second rated.
    Last edited by Oracle; 20 Aug 19, at 16:59.
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  10. #295
    Senior Contributor antimony's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    Putin is a sell-out, Britain is a no-Fcuking-body, China is an adversary. I don't understand India's FP sometimes. Why don't we strengthen our relations with the US and France on a war footing. Why don't we openly embrace the Indo-Pacific and the Quad. Why don't we talk about concentration camps in Xinjiang. Why do we keep buying defense equipments from Russia, when they hobnob with Pakistan and China. This Nehruvian-Indi-F-A-G ideology of being good with everybody has kept us down. We don't have to be good with everybody. We need to make our choices and work on it.

    Is anyone in the BJP listening? There's no prize in being second rated.
    India's FP has actually been quite good for the past few years.

    Putin is a sell-out, so it is easier to buy him. All the sweet cash from the S400s and the Sukhois will keep him happy. I heard that they have come up with a new tank, maybe we should get some of those too.
    The world is a corrup place, and now we have some cash to throw out and buy people.
    Britain and France and nobody's but they are still part of the big 5. That is why we need them. Britain will be looking for friends after they complete Brexit and we can welcome them with some sweet cash'n'trade tikka masala.

    We do have to be good with everybody. We have always been the downtrodden and the pushover and Pakistan the aggressor. That view has paid off. Look at how the world is ignoring Pakistan.
    "Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?" ~ Epicurus

  11. #296
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    India has a lot of structural weakness and is not built for the kind of resolve needed to face internal and external challenges. See how SriLanka and China deal with separatists. I remember chatting with my extended family back in 1996 and we felt that LTTE will run its course and if they arent smart/realist they will get destroyed in 10 years time. We cant have the same resolve in India as the government is inefficient and there are a lot of inter counter voices against anything that the government wants to do. Atleast some one in the babudom needs to read Galula’s classic book on insurgency.

    Also, how come the babus running the central organization are so dumb, especially the IFS, arent they the cream of the crop. The Syed Akbarudding was the first one I saw with the kind of attitude that one expects of IFS.
    Seek Save Serve Medic

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    Military Professional 667medic's Avatar
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    India has a lot of structural weakness and is not built for the kind of resolve needed to face internal and external challenges. See how SriLanka and China deal with separatists. I remember chatting with my extended family back in 1996 and we felt that LTTE will run its course and if they arent smart/realist they will get destroyed in 10 years time. We cant have the same resolve in India as the government is inefficient and there are a lot of inter counter voices against anything that the government wants to do. Atleast some one in the babudom needs to read Galula’s classic book on insurgency.

    Also, how come the babus running the central organization are so dumb, especially the IFS, arent they the cream of the crop. The Syed Akbarudding was the first one I saw with the kind of attitude that one expects of IFS.
    Seek Save Serve Medic

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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post


    My pleasure presenting this video to left liberals, extremists, separatists and terrorists.
    This might be coming to a head sooner than expected

    Pakistan to take Kashmir issue with India to World Court | HT | Aug 20 2019

    Asked by the channel whether Pakistan intended to take up human rights violations or the change of the status of Kashmir at the ICJ, Qureshi said legal details would be provided by the law ministry, but did not go into details.

    Pakistan’s de facto information minister Firdous Ashiq Awan also told reporters following a cabinet meeting that the government had granted in-principle approval to the move to take the Kashmir issue to the UN’s principal judicial organ.

    She said the case will be presented with a focus on human rights violations. A panel of internationally reputed lawyers will be engaged to pursue the case on behalf of Pakistan, she added.

    There was no immediate response from Indian officials. However, people familiar with developments said New Delhi had made preparations for the possibility of Islamabad taking the Kashmir issue to the ICJ or any other international court before the Indian government announced its decision to revoke Jammu and Kashmir’s special status on August 5.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 20 Aug 19, at 22:21.

  14. #299
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    A terrorists is killed by our security forces, and we allow processions and open funeral, which is attended by other terrorists, which then becomes ground zero for recruitment. The very first time a congregation of terrorists took place during another terrorists journey to hell, we should have used snipers and killed all those piglet terrorists who were at the scene. But we didn’t.
    Because they'd do the same with our cops and their families. Not like this hasn't happened earlier to them either.

    What did the USA do with the piglet Osama’s body? They fed it to the fishes.
    What did Israel do with Eichmann ? put him on a plane back to Israel and tried him

    What India do with Kasab ? A few cops had to die including Karkare, Bombay's ATS chief, but we also brought him to trial.

    Let's leave this enemy combatant nonsense to the Americans only. I've never accepted this justification and argued it with the people here at the time.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 20 Aug 19, at 22:53.

  15. #300
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    Not knocking her or what she says.

    Meerchandani is a Sindhi name, so that's who her dad is. She also has a slight american twang.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    Trivia: Shashi Tharoor, the godfather of shakespearean english used the term 'cattle-class' first. :D
    Congress has so much to their credit, I wish they never come back to power. I'll be the first one they imprison if they ever come back. Not too shabby the way my mind works, free prison food. :D

    Sonia is the President of CWC now? Hehehe. Dynasts can never live without bootlickers. These Gandhi scums are the feudal lords of modern India. Shameless buggers. Just die.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    We can't hire an assassin to take out Barkha Dutt, but we can and we should put time and money in building a counter-narrative, based on truth & facts, that look people (Paks) your Army (PA) is lying, and here is the proof.
    Barkha, Shashi, women & 370. Four in one : P



    Women had it harder

    From 2013.. when Sunanda was still around. Moment she married a Malyali. Not Shashi but one before, the land registry in Jammu told her she had given up her right to own land there. Her children could not inherit anything her parents left for her so she had to give to her brother. Her cousin otoh married a Marathi woman who could buy land in Jammu as well as her children being able to inherit that land.
    Last edited by Double Edge; 20 Aug 19, at 23:01.

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