Page 1 of 13 12345678910 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 190

Thread: China threatens U.S. Congress for crossing its ‘red line’ on Taiwan

  1. #1
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    7,504

    China threatens U.S. Congress for crossing its ‘red line’ on Taiwan

    How long for do they expect to be taken seriously with langauge like this ?

    China threatens U.S. Congress for crossing its ‘red line’ on Taiwan | WAPO | Oct 12 2017

    By Josh Rogin October 12 at 6:00 AM

    In a rare pressure campaign, the Chinese government is demanding that the U.S. Congress back off passing new laws that would strengthen the U.S. relationship with Taiwan. Beijing’s efforts are the latest sign that it is stepping up its campaign to exert political influence inside countries around the world, including the United States.

    In response to proposed legislation in both the House and Senate, the Chinese Embassy in Washington lodged a formal complaint with leading lawmakers, threatening “severe consequences” for the U.S.-China relationship if Congress follows through. China’s tactics have angered lawmakers and staffers in both parties, who call them inappropriate and counterproductive.

    In an August letter from Chinese Ambassador Cui Tiankai that I obtained, the Chinese government expressed “grave concern” about the Taiwan Travel Act, the Taiwan Security Act and Taiwan-related provisions in both the House and Senate versions of this year’s National Defense Authorization Act.


    The letter was sent to leaders of the House and Senate’s foreign relations and armed services committees and called on them to use their power to block Taiwan-related provisions in the bills. Lawmakers and aides told me the Chinese threat of “severe consequences” was unusual and out of line.

    “The United States should continue to strengthen our relationship with Taiwan and not allow Chinese influence or pressure to interfere with the national security interests of the U.S. and our partners in the region,” said Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), the sponsor of the Taiwan Travel Act, which calls for more visits by U.S. officials to Taiwan and by Taiwanese officials to the United States.

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee’s ranking Democrat Eliot L. Engel (N.Y.) told me Cui’s letter stood out because of its threatening tone. “China carries out this kind of heavy-handed behavior with other countries around the world,” he said. “It’s interesting to me that they now feel that they can get away with these kind of threats and vague pressure tactics with the U.S. Congress.”


    The issue is coming to a head as the House and Senate Armed Services committees negotiate over the must-pass defense policy bill. The Senate version has several strong Taiwan-related provisions, thanks to amendments added by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.). It would authorize Taiwanese ships to make port calls to U.S. naval bases and vice versa, invite Taiwan to the “Red Flag” international military exercises and provide for increased supply of U.S. defense articles to Taiwan. The House version of the bill contains softer versions of those provisions that give the administration more flexibility.

    When the two chambers go to conference, lawmakers and aides will have to reconcile the two versions. It’s a delicate negotiation, and aides resent the blatant Chinese efforts to influence it.

    “Making these sorts of threats and laying down ‘red lines’ on domestic legislative action is neither helpful or constructive to build the sort of relationship needed between the United States and China,” a Senate Democratic aide said.


    By stating that the “red line” had been crossed by the mere introduction of legislation, the Chinese government seems to be saying it believes that Chinese interference in U.S. domestic political processes is appropriate, the aide said.

    Other congressional aides said that no other embassy uses threats as a tactic to influence Congress, especially not via an official communication. Most embassies try to build relationships and persuade U.S. policymakers to support what they believe is in their national interest. But not China.

    Beijing’s worldwide strategy to exert political influence inside other countries’ decision-making processes has been expanding for years. It’s just now getting noticed in the United States.

    “It’s a concentrated, long-term, political-warfare influence operations campaign that has been going on for a long time but has definitely become more brazen,” said Dan Blumenthal, a former Pentagon Asia official now with the American Enterprise Institute.

    Chinese pressure on domestic institutions in other countries takes many forms, he said. For example, Chinese government delegations routinely pressure U.S. governors by threatening to withhold economic benefits if they, for example, meet with the Dalai Lama.


    In Australia, there’s a huge debate about Chinese pressure on universities to alter curriculum to match Chinese propaganda. In Spain, the government controversially changed the law to curb prosecutions of foreign leaders for human rights violations, under Chinese government pressure.

    “We don’t really recognize the Chinese efforts to coerce political influence in other countries. That’s not even on our radar,” said Blumenthal. “It’s part of Chinese grand strategy. It’s a big, big deal.”

    Congressional action over the next weeks and months will be a test of the legislative branch’s willingness to stand up to Chinese bullying and continue a long tradition of seeking improved engagement with Taiwan. Even if the House and Senate compromise, they should send a clear message that China’s tactics won’t work.

  2. #2
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    7,504
    For more context

    Taiwan president pledges to defend freedoms despite China pressure | WAPO | Oct 10 2017

    Taiwan president pledges to defend freedoms despite China pressure
    Fabian Hamacher

    TAIPEI (Reuters) - President Tsai Ing-wen vowed on Tuesday to defend Taiwan’s freedom and democracy amid growing pressure from giant neighbor China, using a National Day speech to warn that the self-ruled island would not bow to pressure.

    China considers proudly democratic Taiwan to be a wayward province and has never renounced the use of force to bring the island under its control.

    Relations with Beijing have deteriorated sharply since Tsai, who leads the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party, took office last year, with China suspecting she wants to push for the island’s formal independence, a red line for Beijing.

    China has cut off a regular dialogue mechanism with Taiwan, ramped up military drills around the island and stepped up international pressure to limit Taiwan’s diplomatic footprint.

    Tsai, who has pledged to maintain peace with China, said her government was still seeking breakthroughs in ties with Beijing and promised consistent and stable policies.

    “We need to remember democracy and freedom were rights obtained through all of Taiwan people’s countless efforts,” Tsai said.

    “Therefore, we need to use all our power to defend Taiwan’s democratic and freedom values and lifestyle,” she said.

    Tsai’s speech came a week before China holds its twice-a-decade Communist Party Congress, where President Xi Jinping, who has taken a robust approach to territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas, will cement his grip on power.

    Her government has continued to rattle Beijing, with her newly appointed premier, William Lai, telling parliament last month he was a “political worker who advocates Taiwan independence”.

    However, Tsai has also sought to give Beijing a roadmap where its “goodwill” can be extended, which in turn could give her a chance to reciprocate and rein in the more independence-leaning hardliners on the island.

    “We have offered our greatest goodwill,” she said in her 20-minute address.

    “I have repeatedly said, our goodwill doesn’t change, our promises don’t change; we won’t walk on the old path of confrontation, but we won’t bow to pressure,” Tsai said.

    Responding to Tsai’s speech, China’s Taiwan Affairs Office said Taiwan had to clearly state that Taiwan and mainland China belonged to “one China”.

    “Only if the one China principle is upheld and Taiwan independence opposed can there be peaceful and stable development of relations across the Taiwan Strait,” it said in a statement carried by the official Xinhua news agency.

    Tsai reiterated the importance of implementing the island’s new “southbound” policy of forging closer ties with countries in the region, saying Taiwan was seeking to find a new position in the international community.

    “In the face of rapid change in the Asia-Pacific region, Taiwan is already prepared to play an even more important role in the region’s prosperity and stability,” she said.

    Reporting by Fabian Hamacher; Writing by Jessica Macy Yu and Ben Blanchard; Editing by Greg Torode and Clarence Fernandez
    Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

  3. #3
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093
    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    How long for do they expect to be taken seriously with langauge like this ?
    The father of a friend suffers from diabetes, heart disease, but wait - Parkinson's & Alzheimer's disease too. Everyday atleast once he uses uncouth language for his troublesome grandkids. I was shocked when I witnessed it for the first time. ;-)

    Do US take them seriously? No. Did India take it seriously during the Doklam face-off. Again, no. The difference is an imperialistic government that meets every 5 years to enslave its population with tighter controls, spouts nonsense from the Emperors' little red book, and beg considerations from countries it's unwilling to fight and, democracies that tries to cut loose the last knots of government control.

    China is paranoid about Taiwan and Tibet declaring/getting independence. As for Tibet, a free Tibet is in India's interests, not only for strategic purpose, but for another thing. The Chinese saw that importance and grabbed it.

    Suppose Taiwan gets ready to declare independence, and the USN sends two CBGs in the area, what would the Emperor do? Call Drogon, Rhaegal and Viserion to join the fight and lay waste to the USN?
    Last edited by Oracle; 28 Oct 17, at 13:23.

  4. #4
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    7,504
    This is the language authoritarian governments use. Seen these rebukes enough times now with several countries. Does not matter which. That is what their citizens put up with.

  5. #5
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093
    I was expecting a question from you here, which relates to post # 394 in the border face-off thread.

  6. #6
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    14 Mar 08
    Posts
    2,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post

    Suppose Taiwan gets ready to declare independence, and the USN sends two CBGs in the area, what would the Emperor do? Call Drogon, Rhaegal and Viserion to join the fight and lay waste to the USN?
    Never happen.

    Taiwan matters a lot more to China than to us Americans, and no president, not even in the Age of Trump (tm), will ever risk WWIII over someone in Taipei getting a case of swollen head syndrome.

  7. #7
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093
    Quote Originally Posted by Skywatcher View Post
    Never happen.

    Taiwan matters a lot more to China than to us Americans, and no president, not even in the Age of Trump (tm), will ever risk WWIII over someone in Taipei getting a case of swollen head syndrome.
    So, you're saying communist China will risk 100s of nukes on itself by starting WWIII, over Taiwan, an island which was never under it's control. There is a reason why Chinas' nuke doctrine has a no first use policy. The reason is US/NATOs' right to use nukes first.
    Last edited by Oracle; 06 Nov 17, at 11:31.

  8. #8
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093

  9. #9
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    7,504
    So strange as in TO WHOM or WHAT ELSE has china's military being pledging loyalty to all this time !!?? Sounds ridiculous

    The world's largest armed forces should be "absolutely loyal, honest and reliable to Xi", said a new guideline issued by the Central Military Commission and reported by state news agency Xinhua late Sunday.

    "The army should follow Xi's command, answer to his order, and never worry him," Xinhua quoted the guideline as saying.

    On Sunday, a song titled "Be a good soldier for Chairman Xi" was released by the People's Armed Police, a paramilitary force under the Military Commission.
    You'd think they had a mutiny on their hands
    Last edited by Double Edge; 06 Nov 17, at 15:35.

  10. #10
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    03 Sep 17
    Posts
    977
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    So, you're saying communist China will risk 100s of nukes on itself by starting WWIII, over Taiwan, an island which was never under it's control. There is a reason why Chinas' nuke doctrine has a no first use policy. The reason is US/NATOs' right to use nukes first.
    China's weapon of choice isn't nukes nor even the AK-47 (or Type what-ever but you get the point). It's the almighty dollar. Taiwan's economy would not survive a China boycott while the Mainland could absorb the hit, although not pleasantly.

    The situation is very similar to the English Canada-Quebec relationship. Quebec Independence Movement always take a back seat whenever the economy is taking a hit.

    Losing your job and your life savings over independence is not exactly enticing.

  11. #11
    Regular
    Join Date
    24 Jan 17
    Location
    currently posted to auckland nz
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by Skywatcher View Post
    Never happen.

    Taiwan matters a lot more to China than to us Americans, and no president, not even in the Age of Trump (tm), will ever risk WWIII over someone in Taipei getting a case of swollen head syndrome.
    Swollen heads are "Me Me's" and make up the majority of the Independence Party who want to have their cake and eat it as well. According to Li Ao a long time promoter of independence, the Independence party consists of rich spoilt kids, none of which are prepared to die for their cause. So I guess citizens of U.S.Japan, India Australia will end up doing it for them.

  12. #12
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093
    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    So strange as in TO WHOM or WHAT ELSE has china's military being pledging loyalty to all this time !!?? Sounds ridiculous
    Monarchy!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    You'd think they had a mutiny on their hands
    Paranoia.

  13. #13
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    966.3673
    Posts
    3,093
    Quote Originally Posted by WABs_OOE View Post
    China's weapon of choice isn't nukes nor even the AK-47 (or Type what-ever but you get the point). It's the almighty dollar. Taiwan's economy would not survive a China boycott while the Mainland could absorb the hit, although not pleasantly.

    The situation is very similar to the English Canada-Quebec relationship. Quebec Independence Movement always take a back seat whenever the economy is taking a hit.

    Losing your job and your life savings over independence is not exactly enticing.
    The question is will China let its economy take a hit because of an island. If they have learnt their lesson during the Tiananmen Square Massacre of 1989, CPC would be foolish to pursue hegemonic expansion policies. The other thing is how long can China absorb the hit, a year, two, three, then what? China is losing favour with the western world, can China sustain its economy selling dirt cheap goods to Pak, NK and poor African countries.
    Last edited by Oracle; 07 Nov 17, at 04:48.

  14. #14
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    03 Sep 17
    Posts
    977
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    The question is will China let its economy take a hit because of an island. If they have learnt their lesson during the Tiananmen Square Massacre of 1989, CPC would be foolish to pursue hegemonic expansion policies. The other thing is how long can China absorb the hit, a year, two, three, then what? China is losing favour with the western world, can China sustain its economy selling dirt cheap goods to Pak, NK and poor African countries.
    The concept is deterrence; not implementation. It's not whether China can absorb the hit. They can. And they let it be known that they're perfectly willing to take the hit. The question is just how determine would a Taiwanese Independence be willing to take that hit. If the Taiwanese have nothing to lose or everything to gain from Independence, then military action would be the only way to prevent it. However, what China is showing is that the Taiwanese have nothing to gain and everything to lose if they go independent.

    It's not about the Chinese Mainland taking Taiwan by military conquest. It's about Taiwan not declaring that it is no longer part of China.

  15. #15
    Regular
    Join Date
    24 Jan 17
    Location
    currently posted to auckland nz
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    The question is will China let its economy take a hit because of an island. If they have learnt their lesson during the Tiananmen Square Massacre of 1989, CPC would be foolish to pursue hegemonic expansion policies. The other thing is how long can China absorb the hit, a year, two, three, then what? China is losing favour with the western world, can China sustain its economy selling dirt cheap goods to Pak, NK and poor African countries.
    No worries, China can take the hit.After all money talks and bullshit walks.Where were all these democracy loving countries when Catelan wanted support?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 3 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 3 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Third day of Shanghai strike threatens China exports
    By xinhui in forum East Asia and the Pacific
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02 May 11,, 21:03
  2. Drought threatens China wheat production
    By Shuimo in forum East Asia and the Pacific
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12 Feb 09,, 14:31
  3. Tibet rail line is a marvel, but China is mum
    By lemontree in forum International Politics
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 19 Sep 05,, 16:32
  4. China Threatens U.S. Alliances
    By Julie in forum East Asia and the Pacific
    Replies: 85
    Last Post: 16 May 05,, 07:44

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •