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Thread: The real axis of evil - US, Israel & India

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    The real axis of evil - US, Israel & India

    The term ‘axis of evil’ was first used by President Bush in 2002 to refer to countries like Iraq, Iran and North Korea and blame them for acquiring weapons of mass destruction, supporting terrorism and violating human rights as well as undermining the international order based on the UN Charter and international law. However, upon closer scrutiny, it becomes obvious that three countries are conspicuous for their persistent and blatant violations of this international order — the US itself, along with its close allies, Israel and India. By being the first Indian Prime Minister to visit Israel recently, shortly after paying homage in Washington, Modi has given practical shape to this real axis of evil.

    To begin, all three possess nuclear weapons and are proliferators of weapons of mass destruction. The US not only invented nuclear weapons, but is also the only country to ever use them. American clandestine assistance helped Israel acquire nuclear weapons in the 1960s. India conducted its first nuclear test in 1974 after illegally diverting nuclear fuel from civilian to military use, and then conducted additional tests in 1998. All three also acquired chemical weapons, the other means of mass destruction, which the US and India agreed to dismantle after joining the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1993, but have yet to fully do so. Israel simply refused to join this convention. Moreover, as documented by Gary Milhollin of the Washington based Wisconsin Arms Control Project, the US helped Iraq’s Saddam Hussain to develop chemical weapons, which he used against Iran and his own people. India, too, has been accused of assisting Saddam’s attempts to acquire weapons of mass destruction.

    As for support to terrorism, the American and Israeli role in backing terrorist groups fighting against the Syrian government is an open secret. In fact, there is flagrant duplicity in US-Israeli policies of supporting terrorists in Syria and Libya while opposing the same groups in Iraq, particularly with regard to affiliates of ISIS. The history of American involvement with Osama bin Laden during the Afghan war against the Soviets has also been abundantly documented in several studies. Indian use of state terrorism is also well known, such as its support for the LTTE in Sri Lanka, the Maoists in Nepal and the Mukti Bahini in erstwhile East Pakistan. Today, Indian National Security Advisor, Ajit Doval, is on visual record unabashedly boasting about Indian support for Baloch and TTP terrorists from Afghan territory.
    Regarding human rights, none of these countries are in any position to blame others. The American justice system regularly discriminates against people of African and Asian/Arab descent as well as Native Americans. Policemen have gotten away scot-free after shooting unarmed black youth across the US. American military and intelligence personnel have not been punished for the ruthless torture of Abu Garib, Kandahar and Guantanamo prison inmates, even though a Senate Committee has held them accountable. Palestinians are living in a virtual prison in their own country under Israeli occupation. Even fair-minded Israelis have spoken out against the systematic and deliberate repression of Palestinians, as attested by several UN reports. In India, especially under the Modi government, Muslims and other minorities including so-called low caste Hindus are being regularly targeted by vigilante Hindu extremists aligned with the BJP government. Meanwhile, in occupied Kashmir, Indian forces have been given licence to take repression and brutality to a greater level—using pellet guns against children, forcing human shields and employing torture as an instrument of state policy. The perpetrators have been decorated by the Indian Army Chief for “valour” against defenceless men, women and children.

    Examining the behavior of these three countries from a broader perspective of international order, it is clear that they are also in violation of the basic tenets of the UN Charter and international law. They have not shown respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of other states, nor refrained from the use or threat of use of force against the territorial integrity of states, neither have they desisted from interference in the internal affairs of other countries. The US has repeatedly violated these principles through its interventions in Chile, Nicaragua, Cuba, Bolivia and more recently in Iraq, Libya and Syria to bring about regime change. Israel not only occupies Palestine but also the territories of neighbouring Arab countries, while repeatedly attacking Lebanon and Syria. Indian occupation of Kashmir continues despite its formal acceptance of UN resolutions calling for the settling of this dispute. India also invaded Sikkim and erstwhile East Pakistan, apart from constantly interfering in the internal affairs of Sri Lanka and Nepal.

    India and Israel, with the tacit support of the US, continue to violate the internationally recognized inalienable right of self-determination of the Kashmiri and Palestinian people. Instead they are now trying to change the demographics of Kashmir and Palestine through migrations and settlements.

    This toxic nexus between the US, Israel and India presents Pakistan as well as the Muslim world with a clear and present danger. Not only does their chorus against “Islamic” extremism and terrorism cover up the religiously motivated Islamophobic policies of Trump, Netanyahu and Modi, it seeks to justify the selective targeting of Muslims worldwide. While most Muslim countries are oblivious to these challenges, Pakistan cannot afford to ignore them. In particular, we must recognize that Indian access to American and Israeli military technology, such as for ballistic missile defence, drones and cyber-warfare among others, poses a qualitatively new security challenge for Pakistan. In this environment, it is both conventional and strategic capabilities. While these capabilities are meant exclusively to deter Indian aggression, we cannot remain indifferent to the combined threat posed by this axis of evil.

    Published in The Express Tribune, July 20th, 2017.
    The original heading is The real axis of evil, which I've changed to reflect the tone of the article. Littered with childish rants and factual errors, I have not posted this article to dissect where the author is wrong, which most people on this board know anyway, but to showcase the quality of madrassah education and the common thinking and ideology that goes on in Pakistan. And the contributor is a former ambassador of Pakistan.

    Read, chill and have fun. ;-)

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    Military Professional 667medic's Avatar
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    Why are you even surprised by this. Their country was born out of hatred/fear against Hindus. If there is any relationship with India, let alone a friendly relationship, then it means that their founding ideology was BS.
    Seek Save Serve Medic

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    Quote Originally Posted by 667medic View Post
    Why are you even surprised by this. Their country was born out of hatred/fear against Hindus. If there is any relationship with India, let alone a friendly relationship, then it means that their founding ideology was BS.
    I am not surprised. ;-)
    I have been reading articles such as this for many years now, just to get a glimpse of the Pak psyche. Have a ton of them in bookmarks. But I guess, I'd rather post the current niche thinking coming out of Pak.

    The one below is lecturing America. Enjoy.

    American Whining

    America, the greatest purveyor of violence, as Martin Luther King Jr once called it, has once again blamed Pakistan for not taking significant action against militant outfits. A US based report, the “Country Report on Terrorism 2016”, suggests that terrorists are using “Pakistan-based safe havens” as launching pads to carry out their attacks on the US forces. It mentioned the Afghan Taliban, the Haqqani Network, Lashkar-i-Tayyiba and Jaish-i-Muhammad as groups located in Pakistan, but focused on conducting attacks outside the country.

    However, the data that the report relies upon also shows a significant reduction in terrorism in Pakistan in 2016. It is a testimony to Pakistan’s commitment to fighting terrorism. Nonetheless, the overall tone of the report is not in favour of Pakistan, and neither is the debate happening in Washington over the future of American support to Pakistan.

    US criticism of Pakistan is misplaced. Pakistani forces are in a constant fight against Taliban since 2008. Should we blame Pakistan for taking so long to combat terrorism on its soil? No. For the issue of militancy cannot be solved just through military operations. It takes decades for a country to overcome militancy. The US knows this from their stay in Iraq and Afghanistan; why demand different standards from Pakistan that they have never been able to meet themselves? America is failing in Afghanistan and the suggested increase in American troops may not ensure US victory in Afghanistan. Under International law, American presence on Afghan soil amounts to the illegal occupation of Afghanistan, and thus its people have the right to resist the American occupation, and they are. Even at the height of the American occupation of Afghanistan, the law and order situation was below par. In comparison, most of Pakistan is reasonably peaceful and Pakistan is far from being a failed state like Afghanistan. Obviously, we did something right to remain stable.

    America can’t really dictate terms to the people on the ground. We are the ones who have to deal with any backlash and fallout, and we have to follow what our military and intelligence sees fit to do, rather than what is ideal for the US. Has America forgotten Vietnam, and how hard it was to win the war against a guerrilla enemy? It is a lose-lose situation for us; we either get attacked by terrorists or get berated by the US. The Americans sitting so far away from this conflict have a very rudimentary understating of how to deal with terrorism – case in point: Afghanistan, where they are losing the battle ever since it started.

    We’ve made progress, and the US has admitted to this itself. Yet, there is a lack of patience and trust. Their own wars have taken them decades to fight, from Vietnam to Iraq to Afghanistan, and they want Pakistan, a young struggling developing country to fix things in a day.

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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    The original heading is The real axis of evil, which I've changed to reflect the tone of the article. Littered with childish rants and factual errors, I have not posted this article to dissect where the author is wrong, which most people on this board know anyway, but to showcase the quality of madrassah education and the common thinking and ideology that goes on in Pakistan. And the contributor is a former ambassador of Pakistan.

    Read, chill and have fun. ;-)
    I think its a counter to the sino-china nexus we keep saying. CPEC is dangerous because it could embolden the Paks to be more aggressive. It also commits China to a certain extent in the affair though I expect them to keep out of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    I think its a counter to the sino-china nexus we keep saying. CPEC is dangerous because it could embolden the Paks to be more aggressive. It also commits China to a certain extent in the affair though I expect them to keep out of it.
    I've been reading such articles for years now, and to me it seems the stooges of the Pak army and ISI are playing to the gallery. They always do.
    But what you said could be. But that would be a mistake. One thing that we know and everybody knows now, is how the Pak Army sends Islamic Jihadis to fight their dirty work in Kashmir. Anymore aggressive, they would lose big time. Their rental papa 'China' can't save them. And I am not sure China is too keen to let the IN, IAF bomb China's billions in Gwadar. Pak Army understands it too, which is why they run to the US on the slightest hint of an Indian action. But they remain high on $20 billion of weed, I hope China has taken into account (CPEC) the nuances of doing business with Pak.

    Damn! The next decade or so is going to be very interesting. Till 2030. Vis-a-vis, a report I read, probably from CIA some years back, that predicted that global terrorism would end by 2030.

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    Sticking it to Pakistan

    THE Trump administration is about to complete its much-awaited comprehensive review of US policies on Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. There is widespread speculation that the new policy will involve intensified US military operations in Afghanistan, including the addition of several thousand troops, a tougher posture towards Pakistan and closer cooperation with India.

    Questions still abound about America’s strategic objectives in Afghanistan. US generals, who appear to run Afghan policy in the Trump administration so far, have repeated the usual mantra about eliminating terrorism and militancy. But their strategic objectives, even if not yet endorsed by the US president, now appear to be much broader than the pacification of Afghanistan and an early exit from there.

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the primary aim of the US ‘establishment’ in Afghanistan is to prop up its client regime in Kabul, neutralise the rival influence of China, Russia, Iran or Pakistan in Afghanistan and, if needed, to use it as a base to project power in the entire region. As the commanding US general in Afghanistan recently declared: “We are staying” (indefinitely).

    While the US and Kabul continue to declare that they favour a negotiated settlement with the Afghan Taliban, they insist on terms that are obviously unacceptable to the latter, ensuring a continuation of the Afghan conflict. Indeed, the persistence of conflict within Afghanistan and the region creates conditions to promote what may well be the new strategic objective of the US and India: to disrupt the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) and prevent China’s direct access to the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean.

    The reported presence of some Afghan Taliban leaders in Quetta, or a few fighters in the scattered hideouts in the forests of Fata, is not critical to the military outcome in Afghanistan. The insurgency now operates from the vast areas the Taliban and other groups, like the militant Islamic State (IS), control within Afghanistan.

    But Washington blames Pakistan for the military stalemate in Afghanistan for several reasons: one, to explain the US military’s failure; two, to justify escalated US air and ground operations; three, to pressure Pakistan to take military action against the Afghan Taliban, especially the Haqqanis, and ease the US fight against them; and four, perhaps to condone the (Indo-Kabul) intervention from Afghan territory to destabilise Pakistan and disrupt the CPEC venture.

    Moreover, American demands on Pakistan are no longer limited to the Afghan Taliban or the Haqqanis. Apart from ignoring the achievements of Pakistan’s several past and ongoing military operations against various militant groups, the US now also demands Pakistani action against Kashmiri groups to accommodate its Indian (anti-China) ally. While Indian repression is under way in occupied Kashmir, Pakistan will be loath to act against the Kashmiris. America’s accommodation of India’s objectives makes it impossible for Islamabad to evolve a strategic agreement with the US on regional peace and security, including Afghanistan.

    Numerous reports in the American media have asserted that the US will henceforth rely on ‘sticks’ rather than ‘incentives’ to secure Pakistan’s cooperation against terrorists and ‘safe havens’ on its territory.

    The actions to ‘punish’ Pakistan proposed in the US media, think tanks and Congress include:

    a) a cut-off of Coalition Support Funds. The US defence secretary has blocked $50 million from the 2016 reimbursement and Congress has enlarged the onerous conditions (cooperation against the Afghan Taliban, Haqqanis and Kashmiri groups) to release the 2017 CSF allocation which Pakistan will be unable to meet. It will have to live without this money.

    b) cancellation of ‘non-Nato ally’ status. Since Pakistan is unlikely to buy any advanced US weapons, the impact of this measure would be mostly symbolic.

    c) intensified US drone strikes on Pakistan territory. Pakistan reportedly shot down a wayward Iranian drone. Will it shoot down a US drone? Or, conduct Pakistani drone/air strikes against the TTP and Jamaatul Ahrar (JuA) ‘safe havens’ in Afghanistan?

    d) cross-border operation by US/Afghan forces. This would be a gross violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty and a dangerous precedent likely to be emulated by India. Pakistan will be obliged to respond militarily in case of such intervention.

    e) visa and financial restrictions on designated officials. This will have no meaningful impact. Pakistan could respond with equivalent measures.

    f) sanctions against designated entities/agencies. Again, these would mostly have symbolic effect.

    g) designation of Pakistan as a ‘state sponsor of terrorism’. This will be a strategic development. It would put Pakistan in the company of America’s enemies: Iran, North Korea, Sudan and Syria. It could propel Islamabad into open support for the Afghan Taliban and the Kashmiri freedom struggle.

    h) US financial restrictions, including on US dollar transactions by Pakistani banks. Pakistan will be obliged to rely on China to avoid an economic collapse.

    Apart from reacting to US sanctions, Pakistan could take other calibrated and graduated measures to retaliate against the US ‘sticks’.

    These could include: a halt or drastic slowdown in the transport of US-Nato supplies to Afghanistan across Pakistan territory; suspension of all/most Afghan transit trade; ban on over-flights of US, Nato, Afghan and Indian military-related flights to and from Afghanistan; accelerated expulsion of Afghan refugees; expulsion of identified/suspected US-Nato and Afghan intelligence personnel; withdrawal of recognition from the Kabul regime and formation of an Afghan ‘government in exile’ (including the Afghan Taliban and disaffected leaders like Dostum).

    India will, without doubt, attempt to take advantage of Pakistan-US tensions. Terrorist attacks by the TTP, JuA and IS against Pakistan could intensify. New Delhi may feel sufficiently emboldened to actually conduct the vaunted ‘surgical strikes’ across the LoC. This could ignite a war with Pakistan which will not remain ‘limited’ and may escalate to the nuclear level.

    Pakistan’s current domestic crisis has restricted its ability to influence the policies of the Trump administration. Yet, the stakes are high. Even at this late stage, Pakistan should engage the White House and responsible US leaders to clarify positions and explore avenues to avoid a mutually damaging confrontation. Simultaneously, Islamabad should open urgent consultations with China and other friendly powers to develop a collective response to emerging US policies in Afghanistan and South Asia.
    His holiness is a former Pakistan ambassador to the UN.

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    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Seems a pessimistic speculation of yet to be announced US policy for the region. Let's see how close he gets it

    How Pak hostile or India close this policy will be is anybody's guess at the moment. Certainly there are people advocating for a tougher stance and Hussain Haqqani is part of one such effort. But this is just lobbying. There are other lobbies as well. Bear in mind increasing US troop level in Afghanistan and tougher Pak stance are difficult to sustain.

    Both McMaster & one other cabinet level general are ex Afghan hands so there is reason to be optimistic for Afghanistan and i get my way because this board predicted Afghanistan would soon descend into chaos post 2015 : D
    Last edited by Double Edge; 23 Jul 17, at 13:40.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    Seems a pessimistic speculation of yet to be announced US policy for the region. Let's see how close he gets it

    How Pak hostile or India close this policy will be is anybody's guess at the moment. Certainly there are people advocating for a tougher stance and Hussain Haqqani is part of one such effort. But this is just lobbying. There are other lobbies as well. Bear in mind increasing US troop level in Afghanistan and tougher Pak stance are difficult to sustain.

    Both McMaster & one other cabinet level general are ex Afghan hands so there is reason to be optimistic for Afghanistan and i get my way because this board predicted Afghanistan would soon descend into chaos post 2015 : D
    I remember it faintly. What were the reasons given? Ethnic clashes?
    It would definitely get bloody and chaotic as Pak would not let it's control in Afghanistan go until Pak itself fails.

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    Another one: The politics of water

    Excerpts:
    India, following its illegal occupation of Kashmir started using this precious natural resource as a weapon and turned off the flow of water into Pakistan to pressurise its neighbour to rescind its claim over Kashmir. This act of aggression threatened the very existence of Pakistan, as the country’s agrarian economy and food security are largely dependent on the smooth flow of the Indus river system. However, after international intervention, India was forced to reinstate the water supplies.

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    How shameless can they be? The reason why this wretched country doesn't have any credibility in the world stage. They are the modern Nazis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    How shameless can they be? The reason why this wretched country doesn't have any credibility in the world stage. They are the modern Nazis.
    Funny how the Government of Pakistan, al-Qaida and Bin Laden's family all admit that Bin Laden was killed in Pakistan during Operation Neptune's Spear.
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor, timid spirits who know neither victory nor defeat ~ Theodore Roosevelt

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    Quote Originally Posted by TopHatter View Post
    Funny how the Government of Pakistan, al-Qaida and Bin Laden's family all admit that Bin Laden was killed in Pakistan during Operation Neptune's Spear.
    I know, Joe,
    Almost 3000 Americans killed in 9/11. Innocents. Mostly, people who had a 9-5 job. It boils my blood even now that Pakistan has been and will continue to be the terrorist country it is, without it being taken into account even once. The issue is with our politicians. Had US bombed Pakistan alongwith Afghanistan post 9/11, the world would have been a much safer place. But I guess these measures are not in our hands. People get killed everyday from Pak sponsored terrorism, but hardly anyone cares. I'm also seeing a gradual shift of US policies, that if I may say didn't work for decades, towards punishing Pakistan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    I know, Joe,.
    I was referring to Hamid Gul :-)
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor, timid spirits who know neither victory nor defeat ~ Theodore Roosevelt

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    Quote Originally Posted by TopHatter View Post
    I was referring to Hamid Gul :-)
    I guessed that. But everybody in that establishment is the same. US and India are not going to win the war against Islamic terrorism perpetrated by Pak with the backing of China anyway. This war will last longer, and will be bloodier than many conventional fights. Finally it will all boil down to strategic restraint from the Indian side and patience from US.
    Last edited by Oracle; 02 Aug 17, at 03:50.

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