Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 38 of 38

Thread: The Big 19th: China's 2017 19th National Party Congress

  1. #31
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,702

    Post Time to mark to market:

    General Secretary, President, MAC Chair and head of every significant Leading Group: Xi Jinping.
    Gopher Premier, weakest since Hua Guofeng: Li Keqiang
    X TBD NPC Chair, insignificant Vice President: Li Yuanchao
    X TBD CPPCC Chair and youngest leader with no future: Hu Chuanhua
    (or, possibily Xinjiang hard-ass Secretary Zhang Chunxian)
    Secretariat Secretary and Party School President: Li Zhanshu, heir apparent No. 1
    DIC Secretary: Zhao Leji, heir apparent No. 2
    Executive Vice Premier and PM-in-waiting: Wang Yang or possibily Hu Chunhua
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  2. #32
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,702

    The 19th Politburo

    (by stroke order):

    Ding Xuexiang CC Secretariat member (10/17-), CC General Office Deputy Director (2013-), Shanghai Politics & Law Secretary under Xi Jinping (2012-13), Shanghai cadre (1999-), CCP (84)

    Xi Jinping (b. 1953). Returnee; CCP General Secretary (2012-), State President (2013-), MAC Chair (2012-), The Core, Thought Man, He Who Must Be Obeyed

    Wang Chen (b. 1950), NPC SC Vice Chair (2013-), Secretary General (2013-), Cyberspace Administration of China Director (2011-), CC Propaganda Dept Deputy Director (2008-), St Council Information Office Director (2008-11), CC (16, 17, 28), CCP (69)

    Wang Huning (b. 10/55, Shandong) returnee. Theoretician. CC Policy Research Office Director – former deputy Wei Minzhou investigated (7/17).

    Liu He (b. 1952), CC Leading Small Group for Finance and Economy General Office Director (2013-), National Development and Reform Commission Deputy Director (2013-), CC (18), software, data IT expert. Harvard man

    Xu Qiliang (b. 1950) returnee. MAC Vice Chair (2012-); Shenyang MR Commander (2000-07), Deputy Commander (1999-04)

    Sun Chunlan (f) (b. 1950), token female; returnee. United Front Work Dept Director (2014-), Tianjin CCP Secretary (2012-14)

    Li Xi (b. 1956), Liaoning CCP Secretary (2015-), NPC Chair (2015-), Acting Governor (2014-15), Deputy Secretary (2014-15), Shanghai CCP Deputy Secretary (2013-14), CCa (18, 17), DIC (18), Shanghai Party School President (2011-14), Organization Dept Director (2011-13), Shaanxi posts (2004-11)

    Li Qiang (b. 1959), Jiangsu CCP Secretary (2016-), Zhejiang Governor (2013-16), Acting Gov (2012-13), Deputy Secretary (2011-16), Politics and Law Secretary (2011-16), SC member (2005-11), Secretary General (2001-11), Wenzhou city roles (2002-04), CCP (86)

    Li Keqiang (b. 1955) returnee. State Premier (2013-)

    Li Hongzhong (b. 1956), Tianjin CCP Secretary (2016-), CC (18), CCa (17, 16, 15), Hubei CCP Secretary (2010-16), Governor / Acting Governor (2007-10), Deputy Secretary (2007-10), Shenzhen City CCP Secretary (2005-07), Mayor / Acting Mayor (2003-07), Deputy Secretary (2003-05), Guangdong CCP SC (2002-07), Vice Governor (2001-03), PRD roles (1995-2001), Electronics Industry Ministry General Office under Li Tieying with Yu Zhengsheng and Zeng Peiyan 1985-87), Shenyang Liaoning (1982-85) under Li Changchun, Li Tieying. CCP (76).

    Yang Jiechi (b. 1950), State Councilor (2013-), environmental issues (2013-), Foreign Minister (2007-13), Vice Minister, Ambassador, etc (1975-2013). Studied at LSE with Long Yongtu, Wang Guangya, Zhou Wenzhong (1973-75),

    Yang Xiaodu (b. 1953), CC Secretariat member (10/17-), Supervision Minister (2016-), DIC Deputy Secretary (2014-), DIC (18), Shanghai DIC Secretary (2012-13), United Front Dept Director (2006-12), SC member (2006-13), Vice Mayor 2001-06), Tibet Vice Governor (1998-01), posts with Hu Jintao, Hu Chunhua (1986-95). CCP (73)

    Wang Yang (b. 1955), Vice Premier (2013-), water flooding roles; CC (18, 17), CCa (16), Guangdong CCP Secretary (2007-12), Chongqing CCP Secretary (2005-07), NPC (2006-08), State Council Deputy Secretary General (2003-05), National Development and Reform Commission Vice Minister (1999-2003), Anhui CCP Deputy Secretary (1998-99), Vice Governor (1993-99), Secretary General (1993-98), posts with Wang Yang, Liu Qibao, Luo Huining, (1982-99). CCP (75)

    Zhang Youxia (b. 7/50, Beijing; son of Gen Zhang Zongxun, co-county w/Xi Zhongxun). CC (17, 18); General (7/11); MAC member (11/12); PLA Equipment Development / General Armaments Dept Director (10/12-9/17); Shenyang MR Commander (9/07-10/12); Beijing MR Deputy Commander (12/05-9/07); 13th Group Army Commander (8/00-12/05); Vietnam Vet (79, 84); 14th Group Army Yunnan with Yang Jinshan (76); PLA (68)

    Chen Xi (b. 1953), CC Secretariat member (10/17-), CC Organization Dept Executive Deputy Director (2013-), CC (18), China Association for Sci & Tech CCP Secretary (2011-13), Liaoning CCP Deputy Secretary (2010-11), Education Vice Minister (2008-10), DIC (2007-12), Tsinghua roles (1979-08), CCP (78)

    Chen Quanguo (b. 1955), Xinjiang CCP Secretary (2016-), CC (18), Tibet CCP Secretary (2011-16), Hebei Deputy Secretary, Governor / Acting Governor (2009-11), CCa (17), Henan CCP Deputy Secretary (2003-09), Organization Dept Director (2000-04), Vice Governor with Li Keqiang (1998-01), mayor, etc (1988-09). CCP (76)

    Chen Min’ir b. 1960. 18th CC. Chongqing CCP Secretary (7/17-); ex-Guizhou CCP Secretary (2015-7/17), Deputy Secretary (2013-15), Gov (2013-15); ex-Zhejiang Exec Vice Gov (2007-12)

    Zhao Leji (b. 1957), returnee. CC Organization Dept Director (2012-), CCP (75)

    Hu Chunhua (b. 1963), returnee. Guangdong CCP Secretary (2012-)

    Li Zhanshu (b. 1950, Hebei), CC General Office Director, Secretariat member, National Security Commission General Office Director, Work Committee for Organs Directly Reporting to the CCP Secretary. Hebei County CCP Secretary next door to Xi Jinping (ca. 1983-85); Shaanxi (98); Hebei government (-98); Xi’an CCP Secretary (-03), Heilongjiang Gov, Vice Gov (2004-10); Guizhou CCP Secretary (2010-12),

    Guo Shengkun (b. 1954), CC Secretariat member (10/17-), St Councilor (2013-), Public Security Minister (2012-), CC (18), CCa (17, 16), Guangxi CCP Secretary (2007-12), Deputy Secretary (2004-07), SOE roles (1977-04). CCP (74)

    Huang Kunming (b. 1954), CC Secretariat member (10/17-), CC Propaganda Dept Executive Deputy Director (2015-), Deputy Director (2013-15), CCa (18), Hangzhou Zhejiang CCP Secretary (2010-13), Propaganda Dept Director (2007-10), Tsinghua Management PhD (2005-08), Zhejiang municipal roles (1999-13), Fujian municipal roles (1982-99), PLA (74), CCP (76)

    Han Zheng (b. 1954) returnee Shanghai CCP Secretary

    Cai Qi (b. 1955) Beijing CCP Secretary (2017-), Mayor / Acting Mayor (2016-17), Vice Mayor (11/2016-3/17); National Security Commission General Office Executive Director (2014-16); ex-Zhejiang Vice-Governor (2013); 22 years with Xi Jinping in Fujian, Zhejiang (1985-07)

    Secretariat (non-PB)

    You Quan (b. 1954), CC Secretariat member (10/17-), Fujian CCP Secretary (12/12-), State Council Executive Deputy Secretary-General (2008-12), CC (18), CCa (17), State Electricity Regulatory Commission chair (2006-08), State Council Deputy Secretary-General (2000-06), General Office Director (1988-00).
    Last edited by DOR; 25 Oct 17, at 12:23.
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  3. #33
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,624
    What is all this re-writing the book stuff?

  4. #34
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,702
    Quote Originally Posted by snapper View Post
    What is all this re-writing the book stuff?
    Editing typos
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  5. #35
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Land of the One Horned Rhino
    Posts
    2,727
    Ladies and Gents,
    We have a naked authoritarian, regressive, dictatorship in display here. Makes me wonder if Trumph is really the Devil here. Loving it. Sinophiles may disagree.

    Enjoy while it lasts!!!
    Last edited by Oracle; 26 Oct 17, at 17:24.

  6. #36
    Contributor
    Join Date
    07 Oct 14
    Location
    San Jose, CA.
    Posts
    368
    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    Ladies and Gents,
    We have a naked authoritarian, regressive, dictatorship in display here. Makes me wonder if Trumph is really the Devil here. Loving it. Sinophiles may disagree.

    Enjoy while it lasts!!!
    Where is the like button

  7. #37
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,702

    Amend, Brother, Amend!

    BEIJING, Jan. 19 (Xinhua) -- The Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee Friday proposed writing Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era into the Constitution.

    Why? It is necessary to amend the Constitution to incorporate theoretical, practical and institutional achievements made by the Party and the people, according to the communique.

    Well, I suppose there’s a first time for everything, eh? The People's Republic of China enacted its first Constitution in 1954. In 1982, the fifth National People's Congress adopted the present Constitution, which underwent four amendments in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004.

    Oh. So, what’s new?

    -- Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era is a guideline that the Party and state will uphold in the long run.
    -- Leadership of the Party must be strengthened and upheld in all areas of endeavor.
    -- The five-sphere integrated plan, which is to promote coordinated economic, political, cultural, social and ecological advancement, and the new vision of innovative, coordinated, green and open development that is for everyone, are vital for national rejuvenation.
    -- The goals of finishing the building of a moderately prosperous society in all respects by 2020, basically realizing socialist modernization by 2035, and building China into a great modern socialist country by the middle of the 21st century, are also emphasized.
    -- Following the path of peaceful development, pursuing a mutually beneficial strategy of opening up, and promoting the building of a community with a shared future for mankind are of great significance to the cause of peaceful development for humanity.
    -- The reform to establish a national supervisory system, which is under the Party's leadership and covers all who exercises public power, is a significant political system reform and a major decision to strengthen the self-supervision of the Party and the state.

    Wow. Anything else?
    The CPC Central Committee communique stressed the important role of the Constitution in state governance and pledged to guarantee its implementation.
    "Efforts to adhere to the rule of law should give priority to the rule of Constitution. Efforts to adhere to the governing by law should put the governing in line with the Constitution in the first place," the document said.

    "All anti-Constitutional behavior shall be corrected, without fail," said the communique. "No organization or individual has the power to overstep the Constitution or the law."

    All people, state organs, armed forces, political parties, civil groups, public institutions and companies should take the Constitution as their fundamental guide to activities.

    "People at every level of public office, especially leading officials, should exercise power and work according to the Constitution and the law and subject themselves to supervision of the people," the communique stressed
    .
    Wait a minute. State government? Civil groups? Public institutions and companies? I thought this was the Party’s constitution!
    The revision to the Constitution is a crucial political decision made by the CPC Central Committee based on the overall situation and the strategic height of upholding and developing socialism with Chinese characteristics, according to General Secretary Xi Jinping. The representatives at the symposium all approved the CPC proposal to revise the Constitution, and agreed to the general requirements and principles.

    So, only Party members get a say?
    The CPC Central Committee maintains the idea of consultation before decision-making, Xi stated.

    It values the opinions and suggestions from non-Communist parties, All-China Federation of Industry and Commerce and those without party affiliations before holding important conferences, issuing important documents, and making important decisions, said Xi.

    Xi stressed that non-Communist parties and the united front have made significant contributions to the establishment and the development of China's constitutional system. He asked attendees at the symposium to think over the revision, and to put forward opinions and suggestions.

    He also asked them to raise their awareness of the rule of law and lead the way in sticking to the Constitution, as well as to build consensus, regulate development, resolve conflicts and maintain harmony by the rule of law, in order to bring people together and collect power for the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation.
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

  8. #38
    Senior Contributor DOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Mar 11
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,702

    May 4th, 1919

    Can't find another thread where this fits, and it probably isn't worth starting a new one.

    May the Fourth Be With You!

    Today marks the 99th anniversary of China’s May Fourth Movement (五四运动), an event that marks one of the sparks that resulted in the People’s Republic of China.

    On that day in 1919, the Treaty of Versailles’ terms triggered outrage and protest among intellectuals in China. The post-WWI treaty gave German colonies in China to Japan, without any consideration of China’s interest. Moreover, China’s entry to WWI in 1917 was based on the condition that all Germany possession in China would be returned to China after the war.

    The jewel in the crown was Tsingtao (Qingdao), in Shandong Province. It was a strategic location near to Japan and Japan’s Korean colony, and very much part of the reason Japan joined the Triple Entente.

    This wasn’t the first effort by Japan to grab pieces of China. In 1915, it issued Twenty-One Demands to the nascent Republic of China government that would have granted Japan extensive extraterritorial rights on the continent.

    The main result was to radicalize intellectuals who would later (in 1921) found the Chinese Communist Party, including Mao Zedong.
    Trust me?
    I'm an economist!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Russian military advisors in late 19th century Korea
    By troung in forum Ancient, Medieval & Early Modern Ages
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03 May 12,, 04:15
  2. Looking for images: Royal Navy, late 19th
    By jlvfr in forum Ancient, Medieval & Early Modern Ages
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 15 Aug 11,, 21:17
  3. Massachusetts Senate Race (Special Election, January 19th 2009)
    By Kevin Brown in forum American Politics & Economy
    Replies: 93
    Last Post: 21 Jan 10,, 16:32
  4. 19th century tactics?
    By roffelskates in forum Ancient, Medieval & Early Modern Ages
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02 Dec 09,, 18:29
  5. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 19 Jan 05,, 04:46

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •