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Thread: Brussels threatens to block Trump’s EU ambassador

  1. #46
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    They should tell Trump to do one.
    I hear he might be making Sarah Palin ambassador to Canada! What a joke!
    The clowns have truly taken over

  2. #47
    tankie Military Professional tankie's Avatar
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    As far as palin goes im in agreement , but cant really tell a democratically elected leader of the worlds leading power , to er , do one .just aint cricket ol boy , especially when brussels is full of un elected dross , makes one wonder why they would want to keep him away , NOT . lol


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  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankie View Post
    As far as palin goes im in agreement , but cant really tell a democratically elected leader of the worlds leading power , to er , do one .just aint cricket ol boy , especially when brussels is full of un elected dross , makes one wonder why they would want to keep him away , NOT . lol
    I wouldn't worry if I were them about p1ssing of the Trumpster, he won't be round for long at this rate.
    I'm pretty sure Palin can't speak Canadian either

  4. #49
    Senior Contributor Toby's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    I wouldn't worry if I were them about p1ssing of the Trumpster, he won't be round for long at this rate.
    I'm pretty sure Palin can't speak Canadian either
    When you consider they can't impeach Clinton for lying, Bush for being stupid and Obama for being impotent...the chances of Trump not seeing out 4 years diminish considerably.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    When you consider they can't impeach Clinton for lying, Bush for being stupid and Obama for being impotent...the chances of Trump not seeing out 4 years diminish considerably.
    Clinton, Bush and Obama were not mentally ill.

    This is a good idea. Leave the EU to shut up the Quitlings, they can go back to watching reality TV and butt out of politics. Then we opt back into everything. Rejoin the EU by stealth.

    It goes some way to explain his restlessness that Tony Blair, who became Britain’s prime minister in 1997, is just three years older than Theresa May, who took the job last summer. You are a long time retired when you peak so young. Mr Blair uses these idle years to say perceptive things — about Europe, about the misuses of patriotism — that flop because he says them. Post-Iraq, post-crash, he is all insight and no standing. In the 1980s, the Bee Gees were so tainted by disco they had to give some exquisite songs to other artists or watch them fail to trouble the charts. If there were other pro-European politicians of weight for Mr Blair to advise from the wings, equivalents of Dionne Warwick and Diana Ross through whom to ventriloquise his talent, he would. There are none. So here he is. Eurosceptics are right to smell an organised resistance. Open Britain, under whose auspices Mr Blair spoke last week, is the official heir to the Remain campaign and its data. Friendships are growing on the sly between pro-European MPs in the Conservative party, the Liberal Democrats and Labour. There are smart people and lots of money waiting to be deployed. The question is to what end. The mission of Continuity Remain must be to shape Britain after exit, not to overturn exit. If this sounds meek, consider that it is possible to do the first job so thoroughly that, over time, it amounts to the same thing as the second. We already know that Britain will opt back into Europol despite its formal departure from the EU. There is a good chance it will retain the European Arrest Warrant, which Mrs May defended as home secretary, and the Erasmus student-exchange scheme. One way or another it will have to observe the EU’s technical standards and product regulations, indefinitely and in most traded sectors. If this extends to “regulatory equivalence” in financial services then, for a nation that has made a cult of formal sovereignty, Britain will still be up to its waist in the acquis. From there, the European movement that is currently taking shape could push for even deeper immersion. Related article Tony Blair calls for fight against Theresa May’s Brexit plan Former prime minister urges voters to ‘change their mind’ on leaving EU Any break with EU labour laws would be a doddle to campaign against: trade unions and every non-Tory party of note would ask why British workers are held by their own government to deserve less protection than Germans or Swedes. No minister could repeal an EU law via the so-called Henry VIII clause — which allows them to avoid parliamentary scrutiny — without a fight. . As for immigration, voters will not wear free movement but there is a world of difference between the alternative regimes being kicked around in government. Some near Mrs May dream of sectoral quotas informed by state assessments of labour needs. Avoiding this bureaucratic swamp for something elegant — automatic visas for anyone earning a certain amount, perhaps — must be the priority of organised pro-Europeans on the day after exit. The same people could argue for more and more sector-by-sector opt-ins to the single market as time passes, even at the cost of EU budget payments; for the matching of European rules on state-aid and environmental protection as they evolve; for foreign and defence policies to be made with Paris and Berlin on a safety-in-numbers basis, the better to withstand a revanchist Russia and a newly capricious America. The idea is to keep post-exit Britain so enmeshed in the EU as to cast doubt on the wisdom — on the point — of remaining outside. There is more chance of Britain leaving and then rejoining in stages than there is of Britain never leaving in the first place. The movement that Mr Blair is willing into existence will not do its best work over the next two years but in the decade after that. It cannot stop exit, or even soften it. The people voted for a proposition. They want to see that proposition tested. If it tests badly enough, they will change their minds. But there is no way to skip a stage in the sequence. Brexit is an idea whose only effective rebuttal is its own implementation. Once it happens, however, pro-Europeans can still salvage most of what they want. It is a matter of steering the evolution of British laws and institutions towards the EU norm, until the gap between membership and non-membership withers. This is not just possible, it is probable. The best argument against exit was never the steep downside so much as the measly upside. Sovereignty is a dream: the gravitational pull of a unified Europe on our medium-sized nation is too strong. We know because we spent the middle of the last century finding out.

  6. #51
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    The problem with being former is that you ain't current. Remind me, why this smart chap is not your MP or PM?
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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktor View Post
    The problem with being former is that you ain't current. Remind me, why this smart chap is not your MP or PM?
    Cause he was forced to resign by the Chancellor who wanted his turn in Number 10.

    The man never lost an election.

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    Clinton, Bush and Obama were not mentally ill.
    narcissism, doesn't necessarily indicate an illness...
    This is a good idea. Leave the EU to shut up the Quitlings,
    and become a Quisling?? Hmm, I'd sooner just sit tight and wait for April..Hard to know what road we're on until France decides where they are going...

    It goes some way to explain his restlessness that Tony Blair, who became Britain’s prime minister in 1997, is just three years older than Theresa May, who took the job last summer. You are a long time retired when you peak so young. Mr Blair uses these idle years to say perceptive things — about Europe, about the misuses of patriotism — that flop because he says them. Post-Iraq, post-crash, he is all insight and no standing. In the 1980s, the Bee Gees were so tainted by disco they had to give some exquisite songs to other artists or watch them fail to trouble the charts. If there were other pro-European politicians of weight for Mr Blair to advise from the wings, equivalents of Dionne Warwick and Diana Ross through whom to ventriloquise his talent, he would. There are none. So here he is. Eurosceptics are right to smell an organised resistance. Open Britain, under whose auspices Mr Blair spoke last week, is the official heir to the Remain campaign and its data. Friendships are growing on the sly between pro-European MPs in the Conservative party, the Liberal Democrats and Labour. There are smart people and lots of money waiting to be deployed. The question is to what end. The mission of Continuity Remain must be to shape Britain after exit, not to overturn exit. If this sounds meek, consider that it is possible to do the first job so thoroughly that, over time, it amounts to the same thing as the second. We already know that Britain will opt back into Europol despite its formal departure from the EU. There is a good chance it will retain the European Arrest Warrant, which Mrs May defended as home secretary, and the Erasmus student-exchange scheme. One way or another it will have to observe the EU’s technical standards and product regulations, indefinitely and in most traded sectors. If this extends to “regulatory equivalence” in financial services then, for a nation that has made a cult of formal sovereignty, Britain will still be up to its waist in the acquis. From there, the European movement that is currently taking shape could push for even deeper immersion. Related article Tony Blair calls for fight against Theresa May’s Brexit plan Former prime minister urges voters to ‘change their mind’ on leaving EU Any break with EU labour laws would be a doddle to campaign against: trade unions and every non-Tory party of note would ask why British workers are held by their own government to deserve less protection than Germans or Swedes. No minister could repeal an EU law via the so-called Henry VIII clause — which allows them to avoid parliamentary scrutiny — without a fight. . As for immigration, voters will not wear free movement but there is a world of difference between the alternative regimes being kicked around in government. Some near Mrs May dream of sectoral quotas informed by state assessments of labour needs. Avoiding this bureaucratic swamp for something elegant — automatic visas for anyone earning a certain amount, perhaps — must be the priority of organised pro-Europeans on the day after exit. The same people could argue for more and more sector-by-sector opt-ins to the single market as time passes, even at the cost of EU budget payments; for the matching of European rules on state-aid and environmental protection as they evolve; for foreign and defence policies to be made with Paris and Berlin on a safety-in-numbers basis, the better to withstand a revanchist Russia and a newly capricious America. The idea is to keep post-exit Britain so enmeshed in the EU as to cast doubt on the wisdom — on the point — of remaining outside. There is more chance of Britain leaving and then rejoining in stages than there is of Britain never leaving in the first place. The movement that Mr Blair is willing into existence will not do its best work over the next two years but in the decade after that. It cannot stop exit, or even soften it. The people voted for a proposition. They want to see that proposition tested. If it tests badly enough, they will change their minds. But there is no way to skip a stage in the sequence. Brexit is an idea whose only effective rebuttal is its own implementation. Once it happens, however, pro-Europeans can still salvage most of what they want. It is a matter of steering the evolution of British laws and institutions towards the EU norm, until the gap between membership and non-membership withers. This is not just possible, it is probable. The best argument against exit was never the steep downside so much as the measly upside. Sovereignty is a dream: the gravitational pull of a unified Europe on our medium-sized nation is too strong. We know because we spent the middle of the last century finding out.
    Still not grasping it. Things always come to ahead when the minority ignore the Majority...

  9. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    The man never lost an election.
    Nor did Thatcher.

  10. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    Cause he was forced to resign by the Chancellor who wanted his turn in Number 10. election.
    Please explain ?


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  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    Cause he was forced to resign by the Chancellor who wanted his turn in Number 10.

    The man never lost an election.
    I thought Bliar had spotted the iceberg and just jumped ship before the Proverbial hit the fan. Like everyman for himself and sod the women n' children first... moral compass thingy. Gordon was mad enough to think he could do the job, so gave it a stab...Leave well alone and get a professional in I always say!
    Last edited by Toby; 21 Feb 17, at 19:34.

  12. #57
    Senior Contributor Toby's Avatar
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    Any road goin back to the title of the above. Brussels and all the other left wing pansies just need to get real, get a grip and stop behaving like drama queens. The US is a democracy and its for them to decide who represents them, NOBODY else just them!

  13. #58
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    Afraid thats not how it works Tobes, any incoming ambassador must be accredited by the host nation or else they are refused. It happens every now and then.

  14. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toby View Post
    narcissism, doesn't necessarily indicate an illness...
    and become a Quisling?? Hmm, I'd sooner just sit tight and wait for April..Hard to know what road we're on until France decides where they are going...

    Still not grasping it. Things always come to ahead when the minority ignore the Majority...

    Mentally ill and a narcissist. The man thinks he knows more than his generals do about war, more than his spies do about intelligence and more than his diplomats do about the world. The only people Trump agrees with are those that agree with him. Everyone else is a hated enemy.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankie View Post
    Please explain ?
    What's to explain? Brown ousted him as he wouldn't leave voluntarily due to their pact.

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