Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Problems for the new Polish Government

  1. #1
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123

    Problems for the new Polish Government

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-35303912

    I have said elsewhere that I am not particularly impressed with domestic policy of the new Law and Justice (PiS) Government and much of what they done seems frankly stupid to me - some of their Ministers are truely missing a screw. So as the BBC article notes they have passed a law (they have a majority in the Polish Parliament/Sejm) that allows them to appoint judges to the Constitutional Court, they appointed five new judges. Why do you need to do this when you have a majority in the Parliament? If the Court rules against you change the law. Mistake 1.

    One matter that the BBC piece does not mention is last months fiasco surrounding the Counter Intelligence Center of Excellence - a NATO affiliated organisation based in Poland (see http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...nighttime-raid). They broke into the offices at 1.30am to remove one of their own Officers and later said "Polish employees lost access to classified materials and we had to change them." Fine and undoubtedly there are security risks within the Republik but why do you have to break into these offices at 1.30am? It would be far less conspicuous to invite the guy to lunch and take his security pass. This is typical of the whole overkill attitude that the new Government approaches all perceived problems with. Mistake 2.

    The whole press thing stinks in my view, though I agree much of the Polish press is 'pink' I do not believe that silencing criticism is wise or healthy. We all make mistakes and having open discussion and criticism can help to improve policy as well allow a safe vent for opponent to 'blow off steam'. Mistake 3.

    The totally barmy bit is the new Minister for Defence Antoni Macierewicz, a guy who is so hung up on the conspiracy theories surrounding the Smolensk air crash of 2010 (and other conspiracy theories including Jews) that he believes this should be the "first priority" and "most solemn duty" of the Polish armed forces to investigate. This is dangerous lunacy, the past is the past and whether or not the Muscovites were behind the Smolensk crash, and it is possible that they were, you cannot change the past but can shape the future. It's a bit like the Ukrainian MoD spending all it's time investigating the mistakes of Ilovaisk and not bothering to look ahead. Set up a panel if you wish - they already published a 'white book' investigation some time ago - but you have to look to the future and think about the problems of today and tomorrow. This guy is so caught up in conspiracy theories relating to past events that he is dangerous to the future.

    Overall a pretty lamentable start to the new Government and we can only hope that some tact and subtlety and more forward thinking grows as they become more accustomed to managing the many and real problems they face including now an EU investigation.

  2. #2
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    14 Mar 08
    Posts
    1,900
    I suppose they'll get along famously with Erdogan and the AKP.

  3. #3
    Senior Contributor Doktor's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Aug 08
    Location
    Skopje, Macedonia
    Posts
    13,668
    Quote Originally Posted by Skywatcher View Post
    I suppose they'll get along famously with Erdogan and the AKP.
    More like Orban.
    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  4. #4
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    14 Mar 08
    Posts
    1,900
    Quote Originally Posted by Doktor View Post
    More like Orban.
    Orban's too pro Russian.

  5. #5
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123
    Quote Originally Posted by Skywatcher View Post
    Orban's too pro Russian.
    See the Paks ll deal, an official 'state secret' in Hungary for renewal an enlargement of the Paks nuclear reactor under which Putin 'loaned' Orban $10.8 billion in advance. We've seen it all before - North Stream (where is Schroeder?) and more recently the Yanukovych 'deal' of December 2013 with the bond purchases etc. Even the Huns get it; "This Paks deal is camouflage," said Zoltan Illes, a former lawmaker in the ruling Fidesz party who was a state secretary for the environment until 2014. "This is a financial transaction, and for the Russians this is buying influence." (http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/...E1GS6Uc0I48.97). Bought.

  6. #6
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123
    More problems for the PiS (Law and Justice) Government in Poland... again mostly self inflicted. Yesterday they were debating the budget in the Sejm (Polish Parliament) when some arguments broke out. Apparently the Marshall of the Sejm (equivalent of Speaker in the British House of Commons) then held the vote outside the Chamber with no Opposition deputies present and the press excluded. Is this legal? Arguably not of course. They then further announced plans to reduce press access to Sejm sessions. Result was a large crowd blocking all the exits from the Parliament building which had to be cleared by Police with tear gas etc...

    Personally I just do not see why such antagonistic measures are needed, sure if it was a state of emergency some consideration might be warranted but this was an ordinary debate and the Government has a majority to why react in such antagonistic and probably illegal manner? These guys need some lessons in manners.

  7. #7
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    05 Sep 06
    Posts
    3,956
    There's some German media that already put out rather broad hints at comparing the situation with the early 80s, when Poland called out a state of war to put down Solidarnosc the hard way - such as "this evokes memories of when the Policja was still named Milicja". To be fair if the same happened here the response by the state would have been the same.

    The "large crowd" blockading the Sejm - for scale size - was a couple thousand people btw.

  8. #8
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123
    Apparently some PiS people are describing it as an 'attempted coup'... seems ridiculous to me and I do certainly do not agree with restricting press access to the Sejm. They were marching again today, no idea of numbers - my cousins are staying out of it.

  9. #9
    tankie Military Professional tankie's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Nov 06
    Location
    Darlington UK
    Posts
    14,644
    I like Krakow . Great cultural city and architecture , just saying .
    Last edited by tankie; 17 Dec 16, at 23:54.


    Trust gets you killed, love gets you hurt, and being REAL gets you hated.

  10. #10
    New Member
    Join Date
    16 Dec 16
    Posts
    9
    Are they trying to build a gun with the barrel pointed back at them? Really, if you don't like comics or cartoons this is how you can get your jollies.

    Mistake #3 is a personal favorite especially coming from a scifi fan when criticism is apart of the the eveolution of technology and advancement of society. This stresses the need and brings to mind the benefits of freedom of speech and press. With the other point being that if people can't vent they will find another and perhaps less peaceful way to do it.

    A shame with the Sejm thing too. This makes Mistake #1 the butt, Mistake #2 the bullet and casing, Mistake #3 the bent back barrel. Analogies can be so fun.

  11. #11
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123
    The Opposition allege that they are trying to build an 'autocratic state' and would cite some rather underhanded dealings in regard to reform of the Constitutional Court but the whole business and distrust between the two main Parties goes back to the 2010 Smolensk air crash.

  12. #12
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    05 Sep 06
    Posts
    3,956
    Problem in Poland is that a large proportion of the electorate is not represented in the Sejm at all - partially because the voter turnout is abysmally low (i don't think they've had a valid vote turnout above 50% ever since 1990). Their 8% threshold rule meanwhile ensures that you can effectively govern Poland by gathering only around 20% of the electorate behind you - PiS rules with 18.6% of the electorate having voted for them. There is no left-of-center representation in parliament at all anymore. The number of ballots cast invalid are also insanely high (2.5% in 2015), which hints at the disgust the population has in politics there.

  13. #13
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    12 Aug 08
    Location
    UK/Europe
    Posts
    4,123
    I agree that voter turnout in disappointing but I seem to recall the 2015 Sejm elections were just above 50%. The 8% rule is for coalitions; single parties require 5% to have representation in the Sejm. As to left of center... well things are different and PiS is economically and socially more left of center than Civic Platform; higher pensions and support for having more children, more on education etc.

  14. #14
    Senior Contributor Doktor's Avatar
    Join Date
    25 Aug 08
    Location
    Skopje, Macedonia
    Posts
    13,668
    Quote Originally Posted by kato View Post
    Problem in Poland is that a large proportion of the electorate is not represented in the Sejm at all - partially because the voter turnout is abysmally low (i don't think they've had a valid vote turnout above 50% ever since 1990). Their 8% threshold rule meanwhile ensures that you can effectively govern Poland by gathering only around 20% of the electorate behind you - PiS rules with 18.6% of the electorate having voted for them. There is no left-of-center representation in parliament at all anymore. The number of ballots cast invalid are also insanely high (2.5% in 2015), which hints at the disgust the population has in politics there.
    They can't be at two places at the same time (UK/Poland or Germany/Poland). Can they?

    Why else they wouldn't vote?
    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  15. #15
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    05 Sep 06
    Posts
    3,956
    Quote Originally Posted by snapper View Post
    I seem to recall the 2015 Sejm elections were just above 50%.
    Yeah, but with a relatively large proportion marking their ballots invalid. With those accounted for you're below 50 again.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth
    By troung in forum Ancient, Medieval & Early Modern Ages
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 24 Jun 10,, 13:55
  2. US considers Polish missile base
    By Major Dad in forum International Economy
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 21 Nov 05,, 19:23
  3. Polish Election approaches
    By Leader in forum International Economy
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11 Oct 05,, 01:29
  4. Polish Firearms
    By PowerPoster in forum Small Arms and Personal Weapons
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05 Aug 05,, 10:19

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •