Page 6 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 152

Thread: Tracking India's development policies

  1. #76
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  2. #77
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    OKay, soo the hunt for 7.5 lac assault rifles ends. With Russian collaboration, it'll be made in India.

    Kalashnikovs made in Amethi

    This, I like. To keep morals high along the LoC, we also need to buy Snipers in adequate numbers.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  3. #78
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  4. #79
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Bangladeshi man held with pistol

    I read these type of news everyday in the vernacular press. Some Rohingyas caught there, Bangladeshis caught here, this and that. Why can't we effectively man our borders?

    Assam, West Bengal, Kerala, Tripura are hotbeds of islamic fundamentalism now. We can also add UP, Bihar to that list.

    Another one in today's press, Radical terror outfits in Bangla may pose threat to NE
    Last edited by Oracle; 20 Feb 19, at 05:06.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  5. #80
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    US diktat: Why didn't Modi stand up for India?

    So, Bhadra is anti-American. These oldies...........please just die. Your ilk have F up India. It's always give and take.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  6. #81
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  7. #82
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    9,689
    This come under development, maybe security but its been on my mind lately

    India bullish on strategic oil reserve plan | IANS | Mar 15 2019

    The reserve will also help the country cope with demand spike and price rise in the event of border skirmishes and war like situation that played out with Pakistan recently.

    This would enable the country to meet the requirements during any crisis as India imports more than 80 per cent of its crude requirements. It would also come to the rescue of the consuming sectors in times of volatility in oil markers.
    It would seem by 2020 we will have 40 days supply. This will in addition to non-strategic reserves that IOC, HP & BP which is arund 60 days, bringing the total up to 100 days.

    India's seven reserves will total 128 million barrels of oil equivalent.

    China currently has 200 mboe and wants to scale it to 500 mboe

    The US is at a stable 700 mboe

  8. #83
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    9,689
    This come under development ? maybe national security but its been on my mind lately

    India bullish on strategic oil reserve plan | IANS | Mar 15 2019

    The reserve will also help the country cope with demand spike and price rise in the event of border skirmishes and war like situation that played out with Pakistan recently.

    This would enable the country to meet the requirements during any crisis as India imports more than 80 per cent of its crude requirements. It would also come to the rescue of the consuming sectors in times of volatility in oil markers.
    It would seem by 2020 we will have 40 days supply. This will be in addition to non-strategic reserves that IOC, HP & BP have which is around 60 days, bringing the total up to 100 days.

    India's seven reserves will total 128 million barrels of oil equivalent.

    China currently has 200 mboe and wants to scale it to 500 mboe

    The US is at a stable 700 mboe
    Last edited by Double Edge; 27 May 19, at 23:29.

  9. #84
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    9,689
    Does the economy need a Jaitley or a Chidambaram? | ET | May 30 2019

    The economy may be better off with a Arun Jaitley-like character as he delivered on structural changes.

    By MC Govardhana Rangan, ET Bureau|Updated: May 30, 2019, 08.25 AM IST

    A recurrent allegation against the Modi 1.0 government is that it did not deliver on economic reforms. The noise on need to ‘reform’ is only getting louder as he gets ready to run the world’s fastest-expanding major economy for the next five years – with a bigger mandate.

    To be sure, reform means many things to many people.

    For equity investors, reforms are decisions leading to higher corporate earnings essential for driving stock prices up. If investment activity is muted, they would call for government spending even if doing so is imprudent. This is a crowd that doesn’t bother about inflation. In fact, it would celebrate price rise even without productivity gains. Inflation means higher profits, more dividend and ever rising equity valuations.

    For bond investors, reform is government being prudent. If it borrows more, it would crowd out private investments. It hates inflation because it lowers the value of bonds. If yields spike, it is bad even for the government because it ends up paying more for its own debt. It also hurts future generations as they end up paying the debt the current generation accumulates.

    For the corporate world, the burden of compliance should be lesser. Industry chambers forever want lower tax rates on everything from the Audi Q7 to an Atlas bicycle. Curiously, in the name of uniform GST rate, they are demanding the same treatment for goods of essential consumption and those of conspicuous consumption. They always look for concessions for investment and ‘tax-holidays’. During ET’s first Global Business Summit, Prime Minister Modi summed up the attitude well. “If you give something to the poor, it is a subsidy that is bad. If you give something to industry, it is incentive.”

    For wealthy individuals, it is low or even nil taxation on their investments because they are contributing to nation building. All the investments they make should be tax exempt — be it mutual funds, private equity or start-ups. Unless you do it, the entrepreneurial eco-system wouldn’t flourish.

    For giant corporations, government rules must ensure that entry barriers are high. Their argument is that customer service is so important that small companies would lack economies of scale and consumers end up paying higher prices. But the opposite is true. Industries which are dominated by duopoly or oligopoly structure end up squeezing consumers in the long run and the economy loses out.

    For non-banking finance companies, the Reserve Bank of India is a heartless beast that fails to acknowledge their role in providing livelihood for millions of families. They provide credit to a bunch of less creditworthy borrowers risking their capital; so they should be treated kindly. They are not open to the prudential norms that guide banks but want the regulator to be their lender of first resort.

    If the administration panders to the demand of all, public policy would end up encouraging crony capitalism rather than creating a level playing field for long run benefits. While fans of John Maynard Keynes would be quick to point out that “in the long run we are all dead”, policy makers have to be mindful of that.

    The Oxford Dictionary defines reform in these words: “Make changes in (something, especially an institution or practice) in order to improve it.”

    Going by this definition, what did Modi 1.0 do? Three institutional changes come to mind:

    1) Independence of monetary policy, with the formation of a Monetary Policy Committee that decides on interest rates. The structure frees decision-making even from the Governor, who is appointed by the government.

    2) Legislation on bankruptcy. For decades, lenders were at the mercy of borrowers. Now, however, someone who has lent money can take away the assets. That bankers, who were earlier complaining about the lack of such policy support, are not using the mechanism willingly is a signal that the way they do business is changing.

    3) Goods and Services Tax. It was a Herculean task that someone as diplomatic as Arun Jaitley (who is out of the race for finance minister now) alone could achieve it. He gave up half his powers by surrendering taxation to the GST Council for a greater good.

    Structural changes would not reflect in improvements overnight. These take years to sink into the system and the benefits would be reaped over the years. Like it was when Prime Minister Narasimha Rao opened up the economy in 1991, with local industry complaining about competition. The fruits are there for everyone to see.

    A finance minister can give direction to an economy and not drive it. Meddling with banks to bring down interest rates and pushing them to lend to projects can give a feeling the government is active, but it would backfire like it did with the UPA government. Jaitley resisted the temptation.

    Modi-Jaitley combo rarely indulged in headline grabbing stuff that was routine with P Chidambaram as finance minister. Headlines can be numerous, but what matters is delivering on structural change. The economy may be better off with a Jaitley-like character in the North Block than Chidambaram.

  10. #85
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    The Indian economy needs Swaminathan Aiyar, certainly not Amit Shah.
    Last edited by Oracle; 31 May 19, at 14:44.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  11. #86
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  12. #87
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    9,689
    This could be interesting

    India, the World's Model Central Bank? Just Maybe | Bloomberg (op-ed) | Jun 06 2019

    The RBI has acted swiftly to address slowing growth and offers a clear, consistent message. That’s a lesson to its global peers.

    By Daniel Moss
    June 6, 2019, 12:24 PM GMT+5:30


    India is becoming the gold standard for monetary policy in Asia, if not the world.

    While global markets are giddy from hints that the Federal Reserve may cut interest rates, India’s central bank has been easing since February. Just as important, the Reserve Bank of India has been very consistent in its message: Borrowing costs need to come down to juice growth. Passive inflation and the central bank’s full tank of gas make the case to cut even stronger. After Thursday's trim, the benchmark rate is 5.75%.

    The RBI's approach is correct. There’s no point targeting inflation if growth is waning and the very thing you’re aiming at is dormant. Thursday's quarter-point reduction in the benchmark rate, the third in as many policy meetings, underscores the theme: “Growth impulses have weakened significantly,’’ according to the central bank’s statement. “A sharp slowdown in investment activity along with a continuing moderation in private consumption growth is a matter of concern.’’ The RBI made clear that “global economic activity has been losing pace” and declared its stance to be “accommodative.”

    Much focus is rightly given to Beijing’s efforts to pull both fiscal and monetary levers; as big as India's economy is, China's is much larger. But the People's Bank of China tends to be opaque and is trying to thread the needle between buttressing the economy and fretting about financial stability. Japan, meanwhile, gets plenty of attention as a pioneer of unconventional policies – yet its economy remains a parable about how booms can end in tears. And remember back in February, the consensus was that the Fed had just paused before resuming hikes. Few serious observers believe that now.

    So give Governor Shaktikanta Das his due. The RBI's rate cut in February was risky – few economists anticipated it – but appropriate. The signaling power was immense. Officials followed that up with another reduction in April. The outlook has only deteriorated since then. Central banks in Malaysia, the Philippines, Australia and New Zealand concurred. India was, and still is, ahead of the curve – all the more remarkable given emerging markets tend to follow the Fed. Even the chaos surrounding the withdrawal of most banknotes from circulation in 2016 has slipped from the foreground.

    It's important to separate the manner of Das's arrival as chief and the job he's done since getting there. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's team clashed with Das's two immediate predecessors, which cast a whiff of politics over their exits. Das was drawn from the ranks of India’s bureaucracy rather than the central bank. It was clear the government didn't want any freelancing.

    For a while there, it seemed like the RBI chief’s office was a revolving door. Given Das’s success in monetary-policy development and execution, India would do well to keep him around. Quite right, too, given all the predictions for the country’s economic greatness. India needs this to succeed.



    Daniel Moss is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian economies. Previously he was executive editor of Bloomberg News for global economics, and has led teams in Asia, Europe and North America.

  13. #88
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 10
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    9,689
    Jaishankar underlines priorities in first public address as foreign minister | TOI | Jun 06 2019

    Indrani Bagchi | TNN | Updated: Jun 6, 2019, 20:56 IST

    NEW DELHI: A greater focus on India’s immediate neighborhood predicated on connectivity, using India’s foreign policy to facilitate new markets for Indian companies, and step up delivery of India’s foreign commitments will be among the priorities for the new foreign minister S Jaishankar.

    Making his first public remarks after taking over, Jaishankar defended Modi’s invitation to BIMSTEC leaders for his second swearing in. Addressing The Growth Net Summit 7.0 organized by CII, Ananta Centre and Smadja & Smadja in New Delhi, the new external affairs minister said, “Most South Asian countries understand that resisting connectivity is holding them back ... SAARC has certain problems, even if you put terrorism aside, there are connectivity issues. BIMSTEC has an energy, we want to progress with that.” India, he said, would continue to focus on platforms that work.

    The Indian sub-continent is among the least connected regions of the world, he said. “A lot of attention was given in the last five years to this to make it more connected and I am very confident that it would be among our top priorities for the next five years.”

    Jaishankar took out some time to reassure everyone that he would give the highest priority to Sushma Swaraj’s biggest project – of bringing the MEA to the assistance of Indians in distress no matter where they are, by being a tweet away. He said he had picked up the baton from his first day on the job, carrying forward Sushma Swaraj’s Twitter outreach legacy. “We have an obligation to look after our people better,” he said, adding that as foreign secretary in 2015 he had worked with Sushma to put the system in place.

    Foreign policy, he said, had played a big role in the recent elections. “India’s standing in world has gone up and this matters to Indians. The elections were a vote of confidence in this government’s ability to manage national security, an essential part of foreign policy.” A large part of India’s economy has been externalized and there is a need for India’s foreign policy and the diplomatic machinery to help Indian companies gain better access to overseas markets”, he said.

    Therefore, greater importance must be given to the difficult task of breaking down silos in government, making sure departments and ministries are more integrated. “There is a need for greater integration between government departments to create a stronger focus on the economic issues being faced by the Indian companies especially in overseas markets,” he said.

    The world, he said, was changing fast, particularly with the rise of China and India. Globalisation was under stress. Nationalism is on the rise, often validated electorally, as in India. Distinguishing between the nationalism of Europe and Asia, he said it was born of insecurity in Europe but out of confidence in Asian countries. “Navigating the world, therefore is a much more complex exercise.”

  14. #89
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Active oppn important in parliamentary democracy, need not bother about numbers: PM Modi

    This coming from the PM is awesome, who has long been the subject of hate from the elite liberal establishment, the left and the communists. More power to you, Mr. PM. Clean the filth, starting from Delhi.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  15. #90
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 Jul 13
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    5,388
    Unemployed graduates to get up to Rs 3,500 in Rajasthan

    And what will 3,500 get in today's age? Congress is doing the same which it has done for the last 70 years, give out freebies. Socialist asshol*s. Shut down all loss making, for-profit private universities that hand out degrees like cucumber. Impart skills training to the youth. Make farming an attractive proposition. Go all organic.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Tracking Santa
    By Shek in forum World Affairs Board Pub
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25 Dec 08,, 20:25
  2. Tracking the Russians in South Ossetia
    By Parihaka in forum Europe and Russia
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 15 Aug 08,, 09:05
  3. NORAD tracking Santa
    By Shek in forum Science & Technology
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 26 Dec 05,, 21:20
  4. Need help tracking down info re Fallujah hospital
    By dalem in forum The Middle East and North Africa
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09 Jul 05,, 17:36

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •