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Thread: Tracking India's development policies

  1. #46
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Double Edge View Post
    Let me give you an example of some one i know. This guy runs a textiles company. He gets designs of clothes and sells them to dept stores.

    He was an NRI up to 2011 and had an office in HK. Then he decided to move his operations to India and closed the office in HK. He brought back half a crore and invested it into his new company in India.

    He declared everything to the income tax people.

    After the Panama papers leaked he got into the ED's net. Because they found his company in the list. It was in there for various reasons but the ED gets triggered on the grounds of money laundering.

    The ED figured shell company for the purposes of money laundering and slaps him with an instant 17lakh fine.

    He's done nothing wrong. So it takes a few trips to the ED's office to explain the situation. At the same time his business takes a hit and he tells them he can't pay this fine.

    Finally it gets haggled down to 5 lakhs. Which he pays off in drips and drabs.

    That's a 5 lakh fine imposed for no fault of his. But to fight it out would mean a long drawn out affair with legal costs exceeding the fine.

    The mistake he made was not declaring to the RBI he had closed the business in HK after setting up a new one in India. Nobody advised him to do that at the time.

    There are many cases like this and your Quint video is just an example of one.

    The problem is the govt wasn't enforcing rules earlier and then all of a sudden decides to do it which means a lot of established practice where you didn't have to declare every single goddamn thing now all of a sudden comes under the radar and the accusations and fines levied wherever the buggers can get away with it. The big fish camp out in London, its the little guys that suffer.
    See, India is far far behind in holding up the standards of law. Laws are enforced for many, there aren't any laws for some.

    A friend who works in a Market Research (Top Indian MRC) company in Bangalore once told me that Indian IT MNCs find it tough to work with the government. He knows as he handles the accounts of many IT companies. Payment doesn't always come on time, sudden requirement changes, etc. But if a company representative says something infront of the media against the government, there'd definitely be a tax-notice served or some old tax evasion case opened again. Plain old harrassment.

    I have noticed this when in, IIRC, 2012/13, some one from an Indian IT MNC (they were doing a project for the then government) said something against the UPA-II. Boom, in a week tax notice was served against the founders wife's NGO for some kind of tax evasion. It died down eventually, but you can guess the message the government conveyed. I hope you remember the incident. :D

    One more thing to notice is that -> this is the reason why when Indian IT companies build an application for the government, it is mostly crap. Time is money, so the IT company would deploy the worst employees into the government project. The other thing being tenders that quote the lowest moolah gets the project. Cheap ain't best, cheap is mostly shit -> the Indian government hasn't figured that out yet.

    Anyway, I am against this kind of political witch-hunt. Congress will come to power some day, then they would do the same with people and businesses who're close to the BJP. Since 2012, I have witnessed a rise of the right-wing narrative, and the BJP very cleverly exploited that blind-spot of the Hindu-right. People aren't afraid of wearing their loyalty onto their sleeves. They think this government will save them. A lot of them think they can get away spewing garbage on social media. Very very uncool.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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  2. #47
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Devotees check Sabarimala-bound vehicles. Don't, warns Kerala CM

    Patriarchy in full glow. Go men go!
    Dumbass morons.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  3. #48
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    MoD spokesperson sent on leave after tweet on military officials sparks outrage

    The Tweet -
    Admiral Prakash retweeted a photograph showing a military flag on the bonnet of an official car of the Internal Financial Adviser to the Western Command of the Army.

    "Even if misuse of an Army Command's insignia by a civilian is not a cognizable offence, the person needs to be reprimanded by the GOC in C whose 'Financial Adviser' he is," Prakash tweeted.
    The Tweet in response -
    Responding to the former Navy Chief's comments, Swaranashree Rao Rajashekar, tweeted, "What about misuse of jawans in your residence during an officer's tenure sir? And how about children being picked up and dropped to school in Fauji (military) gaadis (vehicles)? Not to forget Madam's shopping expedition on government vehicles. And endless parties...who pays for that?"
    I am not a fan of the Sahayek system, but responding in such a manner to a war hero calls for her sacking from the government for life.

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    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  4. #49
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    Modi's rule has not been good for India, he has failed the electorate: Manmohan Singh

    "Knock knock"
    "Who's there?"
    "Ma'am, it's me. Your bartender."
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  5. #50
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Where will India be in 2030 ? 3rd biggest economy in nominal terms or worse. The NSA has something to say about the former.

    In terms of hard power India ranks 15th, India needs to climb that list if it doesn't want to end up becoming a soft power.


  6. #51
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Ease of Doing Business: India jumps 23 notches, now at rank 77 | ET | Oct 31 2018

    BY KIRTIKA SUNEJA, ET BUREAU | OCT 31, 2018, 06.31 PM IST

    In a big boost for Narendra Modi government, India climbed another 23 points in the World Bank’s ease of doing business ranking to 77th place, becoming the top ranked country in South Asia for the first time and third among the BRICS.

    In the last two years the country has climbed 53 notches, a performance matched in the past only by Bhutan. The biggest gain was in construction permit where India climbed 129 ranks to 52nd place on the back of targeted government effort to remove hurdles.

    The details were revealed in World Bank’s Doing Business Report which is an assessment of business regulation across 190 economies.

    Further, India now ranks in the top 25 in the world on three indicators- getting electricity, getting credit and protecting minority investors, department of industrial policy and promotion said on Wednesday.

    The doing business report ranks countries on the basis of distance to frontier (DTF), a score that shows the gap of an economy to the global best practice. India’s DTF score improved to 67.23 from 60.76 last year.

    The World Bank has recognised India as one of the top improvers for the year. This year, India features among the report’s list of top 10 improvers for the second year in a row. India is the one of only nine countries around the world and only one in BRICS to feature in this list.

    The six reforms recognised in this year’s report are starting a business, getting electricity, dealing with construction permits, getting credit, paying taxes and trading across borders.

    In dealing with construction permits, India has implemented an online single window system, introduced deemed approvals and reduced the cost for obtaining these permits. In the electricity sector, the time taken for obtaining a new connection has reduced from 105 to 55 days. For resolving insolvency, India has put in place a new Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code and time bound reorganization procedure for corporate debtors.

  7. #52
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Power Rankings of countries that project their influence on the world stage. India is 15th in this table behind S.Korea, UAE, Saudis, Iran, Israel & Turkey.

    Methodology
    Last edited by Double Edge; 31 Oct 18, at 16:03.

  8. #53
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    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  9. #54
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    Government mulling 'work permit' idea to deal with those who fail to make it to NRC in Assam

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

    Even if they finalize this, it will be done after 2019 elections. The elections after, Congress will make a comeback. And this cycle of us being taken as fools continues. Easy to scream when in opposition to gather votes. Squeak, when in power.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  10. #55
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    The paradox of Indian poverty: In economic terms, India has performed better under so-called weak governments

    For the longest time, India had a lock on a dubious global distinction: it was home to the world’s largest pool of extremely poor people. No more. Earlier this year, Brookings Institution scholar Homi Kharas estimated that the number of Nigerians in extreme poverty – defined by the international benchmark of living on under $1.90 per day – had overtaken the number of Indians in a similar condition.

    According to the World Poverty Clock, an online database, Nigeria now houses 88 million extremely poor people compared with just 63 million in India, or 4.6% of the population. About 41 Indians escape extreme poverty every minute. This means that by 2025 less than 0.5% of Indians will be extremely poor. This will dwindle to a mere 0.1% of the population by 2030. Less than 90 years after the Bengal famine, a land that was a byword for poverty would have ended its most egregious manifestation.

    India’s achievement is creditable by any yardstick. But it occurs against a backdrop of rising prosperity worldwide. With plenty of wrong turns along the way, most of the world’s countries have arrived at a common understanding that now appears glaringly obvious: the single best antidote to poverty is economic growth.

    A small cohort of northern Europeans and their north American cousins have lost their monopoly on the magic ingredients of wealth creation – free trade, rule of law, property rights and a culture of entrepreneurship. Not all countries have embraced these ingredients in equal measure, but most of the world has at least managed to turn away from the unworkable ideas – usually anchored in leftist utopianism of some sort – that marred the twentieth century.

    In a little over a decade, extreme poverty will all but cease to exist in Asia. Most of it will be confined to sub-Saharan African countries where growth rates have not kept pace with soaring birth rates, such as Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    A political paradox of sorts has accompanied India’s upward economic arc. For the first four decades of independence, single-party majority governments delivered anaemic growth. India’s most dramatic assault on poverty has come in the coalition era that followed Rajiv Gandhi’s defeat in the 1989 general election.

    Between 1950 and 1980, India’s economy expanded at an annualised average of 3.6%. Per capita income grew at a sluggish 1.5% per year. These figures ticked upward in the 1980s, but the real breakthrough only came after India embraced liberalisation and globalisation in 1991. Since then per capita income has grown on average by 4.9%. Since 2004, it has grown even faster – by over 6.1% annually. In this period, India has lifted more than 350 million people out of extreme poverty.

    Why did weak governments deliver better results than strong ones? The simple answer: in India, the era of single-party majorities coincided with the heyday of state planning. After Independence, instead of embracing a market economy, where supply and demand determine production, India scurried down the rabbit hole of socialism where pointy-headed bureaucrats and their political masters called the shots.

    Under both Jawaharlal Nehru and Indira Gandhi the government raised trade barriers, nationalised private enterprises, raised extortionate taxes on the rich, and told companies how to run their business. Had they instead used their power to build infrastructure, strengthen rule of law, encourage private enterprise and educate the masses, India need not have waited this long to nearly wipe out poverty.

    Luckily the odds of India returning to full-blown socialism of the pre-liberalisation variety appear slim. But as four years of Modi have shown, a strong government’s tendency to overreach remains a recurring national problem.

    Only a strong government could have come up with a cockamamie idea like demonetisation, deemed too crazy to try even by a basket case economy like Venezuela. In a less dramatic – but nonetheless destructive – vein the Modi government has armed tax inspectors with extortionate powers, escalating the tax terrorism the Bharatiya Janata Party (rightly) protested when in opposition.

    On trade, tariff-loving bureaucrats have prevailed over liberalisers. And while an elegant simplicity marks a goods and services tax in most countries that have adopted it, in India it’s a hot mess designed to privilege discretion over clarity. Five years ago, Indian businessmen would swell with hope when they spoke about Modi. These days the dominant emotion is a combination of fear and resignation.

    This does not mean that a strong government cannot do good. Indeed, many of those who welcomed Modi’s sweeping victory in 2014 did so with the expectation that he would push through long-pending reforms in land and labour markets, and privatise loss-making behemoths such as Air India and BSNL. The argument that only a strong government can champion politically contentious reforms remains sound. That Modi has failed on this front is a separate matter.

    Why fret about this when India remains on track to defeat poverty? The answer is simple. Extreme poverty may belong in the past, but it’s not as though widespread prosperity has arrived in the present. The fight for economic liberty – making sure that lessons learned remain learned, and that old mistakes don’t reappear in new guise – is never-ending. The successes of the post-liberalisation era only prove that these are ideas worth fighting for.
    DE, Sadanand Dhume is left leaning? I find his articles to be centrist.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  11. #56
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    'HIV is a sin that needs to be tackled by God's rule'

    This moron lives 6 hrs from my place. If I find him, I'll beat him with a drumstick.

    These people, and most NE states are a disgrace to Christianity and overall development of the region. Jesus used to drink, you morons. And yet they banned alcohol. So junkies started using tablets, and drugs, sharing syringes thereby the rise in the number of HIV cases. I have studied with such people 20 years back, so yeah, I have a first hand experience of what I'm talking about.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  12. #57
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Why Gurumurthy and RSS need a worldview

    Dear Gurumurthy,

    Intellectually, you are far ahead of RSS colleagues who think the story of Shiva placing an elephant’s head on the decapitated Ganesha proves that ancient India had mastered plastic surgery. So let me contest your now-famous speech at the Vivekananda International Foundation.

    Your underlying message was that we must develop an Indian way of looking at the world and not be slaves to foreign nostrums. Fine, but I know nobody who advocates being a slave to foreigners. You are setting up and punching a straw man.

    Your underlying assumption, that there is a Western view as against an Indian view, is false. The West has a thousand conflicting views on every topic, including politics and economics. So does India. There is no single Western view and no single Indian view. The RSS may think it has a uniquely Indian view, but a thousand other schools of thought also present Indian interpretations of what works.

    Some foreign ideas can be terrible. Maoism is one example. So is fascism, praised by RSS chief Golwalkar, who wrote: “Germany has also shown how… impossible it is for races and cultures having differences going to the root, to be assimilated into a united whole, a good lesson for us in Hindustan.” The RSS has, thankfully, abandoned that view.

    Just because some foreign ideas have proved bad, doesn’t stop the search for the best. Your speech praises demonetisation and GST, two policies first tried abroad. Keep looking for the best global lessons.

    Your speech shows wide knowledge of foreign thinkers, yet you do not think that makes you their slave. So why allege that your critics, who have also read widely, are spineless slaves? Avoid the arrogant approach of Islamic fundamentalists and hardcore Maoists, who claim to have the only true knowledge, untainted by Western slave drivers. Why keep such bad company?

    Mahatma Gandhi said, “I do not want my house to be walled in on all sides and my windows stuffed. I want the culture of all lands to blow about my house as freely as possible. But I refuse to be blown off my feet by any.” Bravo.

    The RSS opposed the entry of Kentucky Fried Chicken and McDonald’s. It was so afraid of India being blown off its feet that it sought to wall in its house and stuff its windows. I and a thousand other RSS critics are utterly unafraid of being blown off our feet, and utterly confident of absorbing the best from the world and rejecting the rest.

    Rabindranath Tagore’s most famous poem seeks an India where “The mind is without fear, and the head is held high; where knowledge is free; where the world has not been broken into fragments by narrow domestic walls.” You are going in the opposite direction.

    The latest Economist magazine relates how Tsinghua University, China, went from obscurity to global leader in science and technology. Mao, like the RSS, thought all good knowledge had to be homegrown, untainted by foreign thought. In his time, Tsinghua was an intellectual backwater. Then Deng Xiaoping came to power and decreed that tens of thousands of Chinese students must be sent abroad to absorb ideas and bring them back for use in China. That sparked Tsinghua’s (and China’s) rise. Far from being slaves, the Chinese used global knowledge for global dominance.

    Your speech implies that India has just aped Western liberalisation and globalisation. Dead wrong. The Heritage Institute, a US think tank, produces an annual Index of Economic Freedom that placed India at 130 out of 180 countries. In its five categories ranging from fully free to fully unfree, India ranks as “mostly unfree.” Far from slavishly copying Western norms, India is light years away from them.

    Truth is, India’s reforms since 1991 have never aped the so-called Washington Consensus. Netas have used jugaad to create a New Delhi Consensus. Its main elements are:

    1.We have failed to create prosperity through pervasive government controls and must relax these somewhat.
    2.We must retain enough controls to keep industrialists under our thumbs, ensuring that, with fake smiles and quaking knees, they give every budget 8 out of 10 marks on TV.
    3. We must resist giving up subsidies, and create new ones to woo every vote possible vote bank.
    4. Since liberalisation has ended bribes in decontrolled areas, we must make ever more money from the controlled sectors, to meet ever-rising (though illegal) poll expenses.

    Every political party has followed this New Delhi Consensus since 1991. It owes nothing to Western thought and is entirely indigenous. It has produced much faster economic growth than before, yet creates many ills of governance and policy that anger the public.

    The answer is not to turn inward but heed the advice of Gandhi, Tagore and Deng. You and the RSS should scour the world for the best ideas and harness them for Indian progress. I hereby pledge to donate one lakh rupees to any venture that helps the RSS seek knowledge from every corner of the globe.
    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

    Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it - Mark Twain!

  13. #58
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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  14. #59
    Senior Contributor Oracle's Avatar
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    Politicians are elected to serve...far too many don't see it that way - Albany Rifles!

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  15. #60
    Turbanator Senior Contributor Double Edge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oracle View Post
    DE, Sadanand Dhume is left leaning? I find his articles to be centrist.
    i don't find him left leaning, his detractors do.

    Just like liberals treat anything right of centre as far right

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