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Thread: Germany's Refugee Crisis

  1. #661
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Is that really the right word to describe them?
    The politically neutral word (used in Germany) to describe them is "asylum seekers". They're asking for asylum for whatever reason they bring forward. It doesn't mean that reason will be accepted.

    Indian cases are somewhat interesting because apparently - for decades - Indian traffickers have been extremely inventive in finding routes to Germany, and many Indians who try it can raise the money to go through those inventive routes. The perhaps most interesting route popped up in 1993 when Czechoslovakia broke up; Indians at that point took flight to Ukraine, got smuggled into Slovakia, from there crossed the - in the breakup completely unchecked - border into the Czech Republic and then walked across the border to Germany. Germany curbed that entry route at the time by deploying fancy new IR-based surveillance along its Eastern border after a few weeks, directing patrols to groups so they could send them back across the border.

    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    If so what exactly are they fleeing in India?
    For those that flee perceived political persecution, they're most commonly Sikhs often involved with political movements. There have been a few more tragic cases such as a rejected asylum seeker being beaten to death by Indian police in prison a few months after being deported (in the 90s), or more recently (in 2011) the German Federal President officially asking in India for a stay of execution on a guy who'd been deported and then sentenced to death based on acts that occured before he sought asylum in Germany.
    Their handling was decided mostly in the 80s and early 90s, when there were actual violent clashes between Sikhs and Hindus, and decisions by courts went all the way up to the Supreme Court - who decided that we'd still deport them all.

    There are a few Indians in Germany - maybe 100, maybe 200 - who were actually accepted as political refugees from that kind of political frame over the years (mostly in the last two decades, up till around 1990 we took exactly zero). But for each of them of course there's a thousand who got deported.

    Quote Originally Posted by kuku View Post
    Or if they are applying for refugee entry, they are denied and just wait deportation.
    Yes. The decision time on asylum requests by Indians tends to be on the fast side too.
    Last edited by kato; 10 Dec 16, at 10:25.

  2. #662
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    Quote Originally Posted by tankie View Post
    Refugees welcome .

    https://t.co/h4MrTfvrWo #Berlin
    Main suspect has been arrested today btw. He's Bulgarian.

    The other three guys in the video walking away with him are currently suspected to be two of his two brothers and a friend of his. A third brother of the guy was arrested but has been released again.

  3. #663
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    Quote Originally Posted by kato View Post
    Main suspect has been arrested today btw. He's Bulgarian.

    The other three guys in the video walking away with him are currently suspected to be two of his two brothers and a friend of his. A third brother of the guy was arrested but has been released again.
    So its not the Berlin jolly boys saturday night normal thing huh ,whether syrian african libyan bulgarian iraqi etc etc they aint respecting your culture , still im glad they caught them . whoever they are . But they aint good ol tortenarsche duetche menche huh , they are , hmmmmmmmmm auslanders , Ja .
    Last edited by tankie; 18 Dec 16, at 00:04.


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    Interesting mass study evaluating the educational background of refugees who arrived in the last wave - between the beginning of 2013 and early 2016 - came out today; only available in German though. It mostly analyzes what kind of education refugees - of various nationalities, though focusing on six groups: Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq, Western Balkan, Eritrea/Somalia, Iran/Pakistan - have received in their home countries and what kind of job qualification target they have by now.

    The 220,000 adult Syrian refugees can be grouped as following:
    - 37% have had job qualifications acquired in Syria recognized in Germany
    - 22% have a general education degree and want to obtain vocational job qualifications
    - 22% want to finish school to a qualifying degree and then attend university aiming for a graduate or post-graduate degree
    - 14% want to finish school to a lower (general education) degree and then obtain vocational job qualifications
    - 8% have university qualifications and intend to get a graduate or post-graduate degree
    (3% apparently fit in multiple categories, probably people with recognized job qualifications who want to switch to another field)

    Of the 36% who want to finish school to some degree, 67% are confident they will be able to do so within the next two years. Of the 36% aiming for vocational training 72% are confident for within the next two years. Of the 30% aiming for university 36% are confident to be able to do so within the next two years.

    Among adult Syrians, upon arrival 2% held a PhD degree, 16% a Bachelor or Master degree, 34% had completed secondary schooling and 40% had only primary or lower secondary education. The last category is far more pronounced among Kurdish Kurmanji speakers (than among Arab speakers) and among women (than among men).

    The confidence rates among Syrians - especially for those aiming to study - are rather high in comparison to other nationalities; among Western Balkanese, only 9% of those intending to get a university degree in Germany are confident they will be able to attend university within the next two years. Syrians, due to their higher average age (far less adolescents among them than among in particular Afghanis and Iraqis) and resulting more prevalent previous qualifications, are also far more interested in academic education than other nationalities - as a different example among the Eritrean/Somali group pretty much everyone aims for vocational training instead; Western Balkanese apparently don't aim for any kind of formal job qualifications as a general rule.

    Somewhat interestingly, Syrians have the highest rate of learning German; the percentage share who can speak very good German compared to arrival expanded 23-fold among them (from 1% to 23%), while e.g. among the Eritrean/Somali group it expanded 5.75-fold (from 4% to 23%) or among Western Balkanese only 2.4-fold (from 15% to 36%).

    Overall the group interviewed some 3,500 households that included 11,000 refugees for the study, chosen at random from the central foreigner register. Among these 40% were Syrians (same number as among refugees in general for that arrival timeframe). 79% of the interviewed Syrians were Arabs, 20% were Kurdish Kurmanji speakers. The refugees interviewed live throughout Germany. In total there are 300,749 Syrian refugees living in Germany who arrived during the given timeframe - out of 735,010 refugees overall who arrived in that timeframe and still lived in Germany by June 30th 2016. A refugee in this context is anyone who filed an asylum request; of those still living in Germany by then 55.1% had a asylum request process going on, 34.8% had been accepted for asylum or subsidiary protection and 10.1% had been rejected and were due for deportation once possible. The majority of these - two thirds - had arrived in 2015 alone.

    Age and gender variation among Syrians does show a distinct lack of women between age 10 and 29, although this is not particular to Syrians (or other Middle Easterners) and evident among all groups of refugees in Germany. It is notable that this also affects teenagers arriving with parents, not just young adults (with typically a 65:35 boy/girl split among teenagers arriving with parents, coming from a near 50:50 among younger children), and that this does not seem particular pronounced among Middle Easterners either - in fact the largest split among teenagers (77:23) is among Eritreans/Somalis. As such this split is likely - beyond the simplistic Eurabia mongers - sourced in both cultural gender perception and perceived endangerment of younger females on such a journey.

  5. #665
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    Somewhat interestingly, in recent months the number of "islamist terrorists" among refugees in Germany has massively increased.

    The reason for this is not quite that alarming though. Basically, Afghan and Pakistani refugees who are about to be deported have found an avenue to prevent deportation - by turning themselves in claiming to be Taliban. This method apparently originated with Somalis who claim to be members of Al-Shabaab, and has spread over to a few Syrians and Iraqis claiming to have been with IS. Their motive in doing so is apparently a calculation that Germany will have to first properly proceed with investigations, and while those go on they assume they can't be deported, and additionally holds the potential of receiving subsidiary protection since such membership could result in capital punishment in their home country.

    This started about a year ago in a very localized fashion, suggesting the method is spread limited to specific refugee housing or similar. During 2017, 600 refugees in the state of Baden-Württemberg were investigated as potential terrorists, of whom half had turned themselves in; during January to March 2018 this continued with anothe 160 self-reports. Geographically it seems to be mostly limited to Baden-Württemberg; for comparison Lower Saxony - at about half the refugee population - only had 30 cases in total.

    Generally people only report past membership or financing of their respective group so as not to be investigated in a major fashion and so as to remain free during investigative proceedings; of the 600 cases in 2017 in the state only 28 were for more serious charges. Just membership, if proven, can already yield up to 10 years in prison in Germany though, so it's not like they're doing an easy route.

  6. #666
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    More here: http://www.dw.com/en/germany-to-acce...ast/a-43447324

    Germany to accept 10,000 refugees from North Africa, Middle East

    EU Commissioner for Refugees Dimitris Avramopoulos said Germany would be accepting more than 10,000 refugees from North Africa and the Middle East. He added that the EU Commission had received a commitment from Berlin this week, confirming that Germany would play an important role in the EU's latest resettlement program.

    "The German government is once again there when it comes to international solidarity," Avramopoulos said in Thursday editions of newspapers in the Funke Media Group.

    The EU program aims to provide a legal, direct and safe route to Europe for refugees in need of protection. At least 50,000 refugees from crisis areas are to be brought into the EU by 2019. Other member states have already agreed to resettle 40,000 refugees, meaning that the program's goal has been achieved, and may even be exceeded.

    The EU will be supporting host countries by providing €500 million ($620 million) in funding for the program.

    Since the height of migrant arrivals in Europe in 2015, Germany has seen over 1 million people apply for asylum in the country. Figures from Germany's Federal Office for Migration and Refugees show that migrants originating from Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Eritrea were the largest groups to arrive in the country in 2016.
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    Germany originally pledged 40,000 resettlement spots to the UN in mid 2017. They were supposed to report capacities by mid October and again by mid February. Both deadlines were not kept, whereas the other partners did keep their pledges (e.g. France for 10,000, Sweden for 8,750 and the UK for 8,000). Italy separately pledged resettlement of 10,000 from Libyan camps in a bilateral treaty.

  8. #668
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    Federal crime statistics for 2017:

    -40.7% : Crimes in which a refugee was the suspect
    -2.5% : Crimes in which a foreigner other than a refugee was the suspect
    -2.1% : Crimes in which a German was the suspect

    Police hails this as the largest reduction in crime in the last 25 years.

    In reality, that drop? That's just people no longer illegally immigrating in 2017 - which was basically 300,000 cases in 2016, now dropped by two thirds.

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    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...man-taxpayers/

    Osama bin Laden’s alleged ex-bodyguard receives $1,400 a month from German taxpayers

    The German government has been paying about $1,400 a month to a man who once allegedly guarded Osama bin Laden.

    “Sami A.," from Tunisia, is said to have worked for the al-Qaeda leader in 2000 in Afghanistan.

    The 42-year-old has lived in Germany since 1997, receiving about $1,429 a month in welfare payments. (His full name has not been reported in the German media because of the country's privacy rules.)

    Sami A. traveled to Germany on a student visa more than two decades ago. In 2000, he allegedly trained at one of bin Laden's terrorist camps. His purported position in al-Qaeda was revealed in a 2005 trial in Düsseldorf, Germany. During the trial, a witness told the judge that Sami A. had worked for bin Laden.

    He has denied any links to al-Qaeda, but a judge found the witness testimony credible. Sami A.'s asylum request was denied in 2006, and a court in Münster called him “an acute and considerable danger for public security.”

    Even now, the Evening Standard reports, Sami A. is thought to maintain ties with Islamist circles. He lives with his wife and four children in Bochum, a city in western Germany. He must report to the local police station daily.

    Sami A. was not deported to Tunisia after the denial of his asylum request because of fears that he might be tortured there. As the BBC explains, “Tunisia and its Arab neighbors are not on the list of safe countries of origin to which migrants can be deported.”

    At least three of the hijackers in the 9/11 attacks were members of an al-Qaeda cell based in Hamburg.

    The news of Sami A.'s welfare payments was confirmed by the government of North Rhine-Westphalia state, after inquiries from the hard-right Alternative for Germany party. AfD is staunchly opposed to immigration. In a news release, AfD decried the decision, writing, “What fate awaits Sami A. in Tunisia is not the problem of German taxpayers. To protect and financially equip an Islamist, to feed hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants while less and less remains for our own people is not acceptable, but it suits [Chancellor Angela] Merkel’s [vision for] Germany.”
    The BBC quote is pretty cringe-worthy. Yes, Tunisia is not on the "safe country" list. No, that doesn't mean that he can't be deported. The reason why he isn't deported is that in virtually any state we could deport him to he'd face either capital punishment, torture or extradition to the USA (which amounts to the same thing). It is also somewhat doubtful he can be deported since his wife was naturalized as a German citizen around 2005 - shortly before he married her - and their kids born after that have German citizenship. An attempt by him to get permanent residence based on that was denied in 2009.

    The $1,400 - €1,167.48 to be exact - that "he's" getting is actually apparently a combination between asylum seeker allowance for himself and welfare payments to his wife and two minor kids, with his wife "earning" quite a bit more than he does, and either just him or also his wife also working (the amount is about right if one excludes the rent...). Two of his kids apparently live separately or are otherwise not included or accounted for in any payments - which would be the case if they are at college.

    Besides having to report to the police daily he's also under Verfassungsschutz surveillance since at least 2006 (there are some claims they were already observing him since 2003 - before he moved to the city he still lives in today). He's also not allowed to leave the city he lives in - he violated that once going to a public pool with his kids in a neighboring town, and was fined for it. He's considered a center figure of the salafist scene in Germany. There were some attempts to charge him with belonging to a terrorist group, first time in 2007, but those charges fell apart for various reasons. The first time it was because Al Quaida was not a terrorist organization under German terms when he was supposedly with them (a charge he denies anyway).

    First time i really see it in the foreign press. In German media the story gets recycled every 2-3 years, i.e. every time they try to deport him and a court puts a stop to that.
    Last edited by kato; 24 Apr 18, at 19:58.

  10. #670
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    The conservative press discovers that half of all people attending integration courses do not score B1 German knowledge on the language test:

    http://www.dw.com/en/more-than-half-...est/a-43582289 (in english)

    Except the exact same was already reported almost exactly 12 months ago. And the year before that. And the year before that.

    "Integration courses" are mandatory 6-month courses for adult refugees with a "good chance of staying" - defined as being from a country from which at least 50% get asylum. If you're not in that group you can still attend if you pay for it yourself; typically around €1500-2000. The language course component of the course ends with an exam which you either pass with B1, pass with A2 or fail with anything less; typically 90% pass the test, 50% with B1 and 40% with A2. About 20% of all people who attend do not know how to write in latin script and have to learn this first as part of an extended course; among these only around 15% score B1 on the final test (independent of where they are from, Russians do just as badly at this as Arabs, Indians or Chinese).

    For a direct comparison, in Austria (same language... broadly) the counterpart of these courses takes 4 months and terminates at A2. In France (in French) the mandatory integration course for refugees takes between two weeks and two months depending on how you score in a personal entry interview - and terminates at A1; A2 is required there for a residence title, B1 for a naturalization process.

    P.S.: This 5-part article series gives some further insight, in particular the second part ("Learning German"): http://www.dw.com/en/life-as-a-newco...t-1/a-39183148
    Last edited by kato; 29 Apr 18, at 21:57.

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    German police catch fugitive asylum-seeker following raid

    A large-scale raid was carried out at an asylum center in Germany after a failed attempt to deport a Togolese man. Experts say the difficult conditions and limited prospects at such facilities often fuel tension.


    German police sought to re-establish their authority by force at a home for asylum-seekers in the small town of Ellwangen, in the southern state of Baden-Württemberg, after a large and extraordinary operation on Thursday morning.

    A 23-year-old from Togo — whose deportation to Italy was prevented by a group of between 150 and 200 asylum-seekers in the early hours of Monday morning — was recaptured during the operation.

    Twenty-seven asylum-seekers offered resistance during Thursday's police action, which involved hundreds of armed officers. Some asylum-seekers were injured jumping out of windows.

    Police said they had arrested five asylum-seekers on suspicion of theft or drug-related offenses, while 17 inhabitants are to be moved to other homes. The operation was still ongoing at noon, with asylum-seekers being led away, though the situation was described as being "under control."

    "We will not allow any law-free zones to be established," Bernhard Weber, vice president of the local police force, said at a press conference on Thursday morning. Peter Hönle, the local officer who directed Thursday's operation, described the situation as "very tense and very overheated."

    Deportations had already been carried out "hundreds of times" before without any violent incident, Weber told German channel N24, keen to underline how unusual the situation was. "It was very simple at first, until the four officers tried to leave, when hundreds of people prevented them."

    Sean McGinley, head of the Baden-Württemberg Refugee Council's office, told DW that the Ellwangen center had not been considered particularly problematic before Monday's incident — though he said it was one of about half-a-dozen in the state. "There are some general difficulties with these first-reception centers when it comes to these people," he said. "There are conditions there that are not okay, and that are in some cases legally questionable — but I don't know to what extent that can explain the events in the last few days. I do know that people who are deported to Italy are often left on the streets, and that it is understandable that people feel like they are in an emergency situation and that they are very scared, and they want to do whatever they can to prevent it."

    "The fact that it is legal to send people away is beyond question, but on a human level you are putting people in an extreme situation," he added.

    'A slap in the face'

    The incident has created an enormous political media conflagration in Germany, where conservative politicians — spooked by the rise of far-right populists — have been lining up to impose even more stringent measures on asylum-seekers in Germany.

    The country's newly sworn-in interior minister, Horst Seehofer, staged his own press conference on Thursday morning to denounce the events in Ellwangen as a "slap in the face for the law-abiding population."

    "The right to hospitality must not be trampled on," he added.

    Seehofer's solution is to build new "anchor centers" for asylum-seekers across Germany — large-scale facilities where entire asylum procedures can be processed under one roof and where asylum-seekers are forced to spend their entire time — not unlike the first-reception center in Ellwangen. The law was changed last year to allow states to keep asylum-seekers in the first-reception centers for up to two years — which critics say further hinders their chances of being integrated into communities.

    Five or six pilot anchor centers are to be prepared for testing across the country in the coming months, Seehofer said, amid criticism from police unions, who argued officers were not trained to "run prisons."

    Seehofer is head of the conservative Christian Social Union (CSU), the Bavarian sister-party to Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU), which is facing a bitter battle for votes against the far-right, anti-refugee Alternative for Germany (AfD) in Bavaria's state election in September.

    But other political parties have questioned whether creating even more large-scale centralized shelters for asylum-seekers is a wise option, considering the events in Ellwangen. "That creates a dynamic and a potential for violence, and it all goes on the backs of police officers," commented Green Party domestic policy spokeswoman Irene Mihalic.

    A system programmed to fail

    Stephan Dünnwald, of the Bavarian Refugee Council, described the living conditions in large-scale homes in distressing terms. "Imagine you're stuck there with three or four hundred other people and every other night the police come and pick one of you up, and you don't know who is going to be next," he told DW. "That creates enormous tension among the inhabitants."

    Asylum-seekers are often left to live in the homes for months at a time while they wait for their applications to be processed — they are not allowed to look for work in that time, or even to take German classes or do any job training, which leaves them facing some difficult choices. "They sit around and wait to see what happens to them," said Dünnwald. "For one month you might think of it as a holiday, but if you've been sitting there for half-a-year and you can't do anything — nothing at all — then of course you think about what you're going to do: Do I stay here? Do I go into hiding? Do I try and find a job illegally? Or do I start doing something criminal?"

    Asylum policy in the European Union is regulated through the so-called Dublin system, which stipulates that migrants must be transferred to the member state where they first entered the EU. In practice that often means Greece or Italy, to where the Togolese man was due to be deported on Monday.

    According to Dünnwald, these countries often don't maintain the EU's basic humanitarian standards. "In Italy, most people aren't looked after — they don't get shelter, they live on the streets. They don't get any money, so they have to get by through doing illegal work, or begging, or prostitution," he said. "So obviously people don't want to go back there."

    The whole of the EU's asylum policy, in other words, is based on the principle of trying to "scare people off," Dünnwald said.
    http://www.dw.com/en/german-police-c...aid/a-43638039

    For some explanation of terms:
    "home for asylum-seekers in the small town of Ellwangen" = former Bundeswehr base with unused buildings fenced off and reused for housing refugees.
    "23-year-old from Togo was recaptured" = He was willingly let go by the first group of officers in the face of resistance by others, and neither on the first nor second time had to be "captured".
    "Experts say the difficult conditions and limited prospects at such facilities often fuel tension" = They're basically jails for people with low chances of asylum to hold them until deportation. Furthermore see description below.

    As a short recap of what actually happened:

    Four police officers try to get a Togolese man from such a deportation camp to deport him to Italy under the Dublin Treaty on Monday at 2:30 AM. Some 50 other refugees at the camp - mostly Africans - start threatening them resulting in the four officers withdrawing to the guard house at the front gate after about 100 other refugees wake up and start forming a crowd. Police comes in at 5:15 AM three days later with four hundred officers and combs through the entire camp. Out of 292 refugees searched 23 people were arrested for "resistance", five had drugs found in their belongings, two had stolen clothing among their belongings, eighteen had more cash than Germany is allowing refugees to own, five people were arrested for being on premise without being housed there. Since the original threats included announcing that next time they'd greet the police with weapons in hand police was primarily searching for any weapons - but did not find any. Eleven refugees and one officer were injured in the operation; despite what it says in the article nine of those eleven refugees were not injured jumping out of windows. The officer injured himself in an accident. 11 of the refugees will be moved to other camps to break up any sort of organization between them, including the original Togolese deportee.

    The "Ellwangen state first-reception facility" has a maximum capacity of 1000 people and houses currently about 450-500 refugees from countries with low chances of their asylum request being accepted - currently mostly from Gambia, Nigeria and Cameroon for African countries; during 2017 about 40% of refugees coming to the state were from those three African countries. The refugee family housing on the premise - housing about 40% of the camp population - wasn't searched. People housed at the camp may not own more than 350 Euro in cash - one month of existence-minimum expenditures - and may not leave the Ostalb county in Baden-Württemberg in which Ellwangen is located. Only the accomodations for single men were searched. Camps like Ellwangen have a local police presence of typically 4-12 officers onsite in addition to a civilian security detail. Longterm plans are for all refugees being concentrated at only four camps and one distribution center - with Ellwangen likely to be replaced by a new camp under construction in Schwäbisch Hall about 40 km northwest in the same district; right now there are seven such camps and the distribution center housing in total 5,100 refugees.

  12. #672
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Source: http://www.dw.com/en/german-refugee-...ons/a-43857719
    German refugee agency probes more branches over asylum decisions

    Several more regional branches of Germany's Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) are being subjected to checks regarding their approval of asylum applications, a German newspaper reported on Sunday.

    The Bild am Sonntag said 13 branches were being probed in addition to an ongoing investigation into activities at BAMF's regional office in the northern city of Bremen, where 1,200 asylum decisions are thought to have possibly been improperly approved.

    The branches had come under scrutiny because there were noticeable differences in the number of asylum applications accepted or rejected in comparison with other offices, the report said.

    It said altogether some 8,000 applications were to be re-checked.

    Germany's migration authorities came under intense pressure with the influx of around a million refugees into Germany in 2015 and still have a large backlog of asylum applications awaiting decisions.

    Read more: Why horrid tales alone won't help German asylum applications

    Alleged bribes

    Sunday's report comes after it became known in April that a former official at Bremen's BAMF office was under investigation for having allegedly taken bribes from some 1,200 refugees between 2013 and 2016 in return for approving their asylum applications. Five other people at the office, including an interpreter and three lawyers, are being investigated as well, some also under suspicion of taking bribes.

    Some 18,000 approvals granted by the office since 2000 are to be reviewed in the next three months, BAMF director Jutta Cordt said on Friday.

    According to a report in the news magazine Spiegel, some of the people who benefited from the alleged manipulations in Bremen were considered to be potential security risks.
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    Sunday's report comes after it became known in April that a former official at Bremen's BAMF office was under investigation for having allegedly taken bribes from some 1,200 refugees between 2013 and 2016 in return for approving their asylum applications.
    All 4,400 asylum cases in which the lawyers were involved were already checked, including 1,200 in Bremen. 73% of cases in Bremen showed some "implausibilities", compared to 46% in the other agencies checked. Of the cases in Bremen 40% - i.e. 350 - will be reopened for cancelling their approval, in other agencies checked it'll be 6% - i.e. 185.

    Most of the affected cases were apparently Yazhidi Kurds from Iraq.

    The branches had come under scrutiny because there were noticeable differences in the number of asylum applications accepted or rejected in comparison with other offices, the report said.
    A bit more accurately: They are checking all 10 branch offices where the percentage share of approvals during 2017 deviated by more than 10% from the federal average for particular nationalities. Both up- and downwards.

  14. #674
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Is that really the right word to describe them? If so what exactly are they fleeing in India? Just curious if that word is used to simply be politically correct like migrant instead of alien.
    As Kato said, in the 80s and 90s they were fleeing persecution from authorities in India because someone in their family or someone connected to them was a Khalistani terrorist. Among them, many were actually terrorists. Also the 1984 riots, those were genuine asylum seekers.

    Sikhs illegally migrating now is due to lesser opportunities within Punjab. The drug problem is severe, and many have sold off their family gold or agricultural land to fund their addiction and/or migrate abroad. Since there is no visa for low skilled workers, they often use illegal routes. I have heard of people who somehow got inside the UK, then tore their passports and applied for asylum. If the authorities don't know which country they came from, they doesn't get deported.
    Last edited by Oracle; 21 May 18, at 21:01.

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    For scale of Indian asylum seekers in Germany, statistics for 2017:
    • overall for Indian nationals
      • 3761 asylum decisions
      • 2580 cases from previous years decided in 2017
      • 1181 cases from 2017 decided in 2017
      • 232 cases carried forward to 2018
    • 2.66% granted:
      • 0.03% (1) granted asylum
      • 1.04% granted refugee status (Geneva refugee status)
      • 0.37% granted subsidiary protection (threatened with individual danger to life or limb in home country)
      • 1.22% granted stay of deportation (same as above or for medical reasons)
    • 97.34% not granted:
      • 74.15% rejected (considered no reasons for asylum)
      • 23.19% cancelled (e.g. left country before case was finished)


    P.S. : The above 2.66% is only slightly higher than Kosovo at 2.30%.

    For comparison though, the acceptance rate of European Union refugees in Germany was considerably higher at 3.98% and the acceptance rate of US American refugees in Germany was ten times higher at 26.67% last year - and yes, we do get asylum seekers from both the European Union and the USA. Not just a handful either.
    Last edited by kato; 20 May 18, at 17:03.

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