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Thread: The NSA

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdude View Post
    I don't blame you minions living outside of the Empire yet worry so much about the Empire's image. Let me walk you through what happened last month inside the Empire well you minions busy fighting in the provinces (for the empire, and we salute you, no dough for you though).

    The US accused China of cyber attacks. The Emperor made it a big deal during the meeting with China's president. 2 days later, Snowden happened. During an interview with SCMP, Snowden said US not only attacks China, but also HK, HK's universities and governments.

    Pants down, man down.

    Empire is pissed, but caught shirtless nevertheless in front of the world. Only oblivious to little minions around the world.
    If I were the POTUS, I could expose "A Former Chinese Internet Warrior" that show off the "contents of massive cyber attack to the United States top military secrets", as a propaganda countermeasure. No matter this warrior was staged or not.

    If Mr. Snowden was not smart enough, he would expose himself too.
    Last edited by Enzo Ferrari; 25 Jun 13, at 05:23.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie View Post
    I am torn with the subject. First of all, Nixon was impeached for wire-tapping an office, whereas our government is tapping the entire country, and obviously the entire world, which to me is a severe imbalance.

    On the other hand, I understand something of sorts is needed to obstruct terrorists attacks within our country, but how far this should go, I am not sure. I do know that attacks have been avoided due to the nature of intercepting certain communications.

    Then you have the situation of China and the cyberattacks cdude mentioned, then it is revealed the US has been doing the same thing, and it seems in a broader nature. Do these countries have some limited right to Snowden to learn the critical data the US intercepted about them? Does the US have a right to make demands upon these countries for extradition, when the US was breaking international law?

    Not sure about any of that, but I am confused as hell about it as to who is right and/or wrong.

    The only thing I do know is that I don't like a two-headed coin, and that is what this situation seems to be.
    Simple, no 9-11 before the year of 1973.

  3. #63
    Senior Contributor Doktor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdude View Post
    that's why you are a minion.
    We can go in circles like this. If you have something to add, but calling me names, do so.
    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  4. #64
    In Memoriam Military Professional Minskaya's Avatar
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    If anyone thinks China is a winged cyber angel, they are delusional. In my previous staff stint on another vB board, China would probe us every day looking for exploits. During the course of eight years, nine out of every ten attempts to hack the board originated in China. The token remainder emanated from either Russia or Eastern Europe.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minskaya View Post
    If anyone thinks China is a winged cyber angel, they are delusional. In my previous staff stint on another vB board, China would probe us every day looking for exploits. During the course of eight years, nine out of every ten attempts to hack the board originated in China. The token remainder emanated from either Russia or Eastern Europe.
    Chinese servers, on average, have one of the worst security measures among major countries. Admins there don't know there ways around. THe point is, you don't know if those attacks are from Chinese hackers or non-Chinese hackers using Chinese computers.

  6. #66
    Staff Emeritus Julie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enzo Ferrari View Post
    Simple, no 9-11 before the year of 1973.
    Yes, but it seems everyone is doing it, and China did not have a "9-11."

  7. #67
    Senior Contributor Doktor's Avatar
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    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  8. #68
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    A nice recap by Forbes.

    Take A Break From The Snowden Drama For A Reminder Of What He's Revealed So Far

    A leaker as fascinating as Edward Snowden is his own worst enemy. The world has become so caught up in the suspense and intrigue of the Snowden Affair–practically a ready-made Robert Ludlum title–that it seems to have almost forgotten the massive National Security Agency surveillance controversy that he’s risked his future to bring to light.

    On Tuesday morning, Russian president Vladimir Putin confirmed that the 29-year-old whistleblower is now in Moscow’s airport after disappearing from his temporary refuge in Hong Kong Sunday. His supposed flight from Russia to Cuba, in another spy novel twist, seems to have been a ruse. And WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange, who has taken Snowden under his wing and helped to arrange his escape from America’s long legal arm, has confirmed that the former Booz Allen Hamilton employee is seeking asylum in Ecuador.

    So now is as good a time as any to take an intermission from the drama and recall the real story: the biggest global privacy scandal of the decade. Here’s a recap of Snowden’s leaked documents published so far, in my own highly subjective order of importance.

    The publication of Snowden’s leaks began with a top secret order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) sent to Verizon on behalf of the NSA, demanding the cell phone records of all of Verizon Business Network Services’ American customers for the three month period ending in July. The order, obtained by the Guardian, sought only the metadata of those millions of users’ calls–who called whom when and from what locations–but specifically requested Americans’ records, disregarding foreigners despite the NSA’s legal restrictions that it may only surveil non-U.S. persons. Senators Saxby Chambliss and Diane Feinstein defended the program and said it was in fact a three-month renewal of surveillance practices that had gone for seven years.

    In a congressional hearing, NSA director Keith Alexander argued that the kind of surveillance of Americans’ data revealed in that Verizon order was necessary to for archiving purposes, but was rarely accessed and only with strict oversight from Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court judges. But another secret document published by the Guardian revealed the NSA’s own rules for when it makes broad exceptions to its foreign vs. U.S. persons distinction, accessing Americans’ data and holding onto it indefinitely. Those exceptions include anytime Americans’ data is judged to be “significant foreign intelligence” information or information about a crime that has been or is about to be committed, any data “involved in the unauthorized disclosure of national security information,” or necessary to “assess a communications security vulnerability.” Any encrypted data that the NSA wants to crack can also be held indefinitely, regardless of whether its American or foreign origin.

    Another leaked slide deck revealed a software tool called Boundless Informant, which the NSA appears to use for tracking the origin of data it collects. The leaked materials included a map produced by the program showing the frequency of data collection in countries around the world. While Iran, Pakistan and Jordan appeared to be the most surveilled countries according to the map, it also pointed to significant data collection from the United States.

    A leaked executive order from President Obama shows the administration asked intelligence agencies to draw up a list of potential offensive cyberattack targets around the world. The order, which suggests targeting “systems, processes and infrastructure” states that such offensive hacking operations “can offer unique and unconventional capabilities to advance U.S. national objectives around the world with little or no warning to the adversary or target and with potential effects ranging from subtle to severely damaging.” The order followed repeated accusations by the U.S. government that China has engaged in state-sponsored hacking operations, and was timed just a day before President Obama’s summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

    Documents leaked to the Guardian revealed a five-year-old British intelligence scheme to tap transatlantic fiberoptic cables to gather data. A program known as Tempora, created by the U.K.’s NSA equivalent Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has for the last 18 months been able to store huge amounts of that raw data for up to 30 days. Much of the data is shared with the NSA, which had assigned 250 analysts to sift through it as of May of last year.

    Another GCHQ project revealed to the Guardian through leaked documents intercepted the communications of delegates to the G20 summit of world leaders in London in 2009. The scheme included monitoring the attendees’ phone calls and emails by accessing their Blackberrys, and even setting up fake Internet cafes that used keylogging software to surveil them.

    Snowden showed the Hong Kong newspaper the South China Morning Post documents that it said outlined extensive hacking of Chinese and Hong Kong targets by the NSA since 2009, with 61,000 targets globally and “hundreds” in China. Other SCMP stories based on Snowden’s revelations stated that the NSA had gained access to the Chinese fiberoptic network operator Pacnet as well as Chinese mobile phone carriers, and had gathered large quantities of Chinese SMS messages.

    The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald has said that Snowden provided him “thousands” of documents, of which “dozens” are newsworthy. And Snowden himself has said he’d like to expose his trove of leaks to the global media so that each country’s reporters can decide whether “U.S. network operations against their people should be published.” So regardless of where Snowden ends up, expect more of his revelations to follow.
    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdude View Post
    Chinese servers, on average, have one of the worst security measures among major countries. Admins there don't know there ways around. THe point is, you don't know if those attacks are from Chinese hackers or non-Chinese hackers using Chinese computers.
    CREF Minskayas prev comment re this

    and yes we can and do know where the hacks come from but its not going to end up as a discussion "how do we know?" on a public forum.

    I've seen the data and probe attacks change on my priv and mil email accts change and increase over the last 13 years. At one stage I was getting hundreds of system probes per day and we could trace where they were coming out of. The average user can't tell, but someone behind an effective cyber layer can.

  10. #70
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    all the governments, not only America but every government which is capable of shall be ..doing the same as the Americans did it is required from security point of view .but the thought process is that ..it should be lawfully acknowledged and rules be set for such ..

  11. #71
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    might be so,then the responsibility again comes over to nation which is so advanced and so ahead ranking in first three in world.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by chatrapatiSAS View Post
    might be so,then the responsibility again comes over to nation which is so advanced and so ahead ranking in first three in world.
    My evolution for today

  13. #73
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    France Has A PRISM-Like Program With Millions Of Trillions Of Metadata Elements

    Sacrebleu! The NSA isn’t the only security agency to collect data. In fact, France’s PRISM-like program is going very strong with millions of trillions of metadata elements stored in a Parisian basement, according to a report from French newspaper Le Monde. The program targets phone communications, emails and data from Internet giants, such as Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and Yahoo! It is deemed illegal by the CNIL, the French data protection authority but it is not as clear as it seems.

    At least eight deputies and senators know about the program but they have sworn to secrecy. They mention 2008 as a pivotal year for the DGSE (General Directorate for External Security). It could be the starting point of the unnamed surveillance program. The DGSE entirely designed the program and no data protection representative is overseeing it.

    As is the case with PRISM, the agency only collects metadata elements — a call history, recipients and sizes of text messages, email subjects, as well as all your activity on services operated by Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Yahoo! and Apple. With a single query, French authorities can list your contacts. For each contact, they know how frequently you talked and what communication channel you are using.

    For phone data, the DGSE uses electromagnetic technologies to collect the metadata. The caller’s location is recorded as well. That’s why a former DGSE official claims that the program isn’t illegal. It doesn’t actually record your calls. The DGSE is on the fringe of illegality.

    In the basement of DGSE’s headquarters, a three-story high supercomputer handles this flow of information. This computer even heats up the entire building, according to Le Monde. It could be the second biggest supercomputer in Europe behind the one in London.

    So far, the French government hasn’t reacted nor provided a statement. While European Union representatives — including French president François Hollande — were deeply worried by the NSA/PRISM controversy, it appears that the U.K. and now France use the same methods to collect data.
    No such thing as a good tax - Churchill

    To make mistakes is human. To blame someone else for your mistake, is strategic.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktor View Post
    So far, the French government hasn’t reacted nor provided a statement. While European Union representatives — including French president François Hollande — were deeply worried by the NSA/PRISM controversy, it appears that the U.K. and now France use the same methods to collect data.
    CREF my comments elsewhere around Snowden

  15. #75
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    I don't think the NSA has anything over Chevron. Try working in their HQ, in San Ramon, and see exactly how much it is like Big Brother and 1984 all rolled into one. One would not believe what all their employees work under in the name of "safety".

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