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Thread: DDG-1000 News

  1. #121
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    Posted: September 25, 2014 3:35 PM

    Destroyer Zumwalt Completes Generator Light-Off

    BATH, Maine — The Navy’s Zumwalt-class (DDG 1000) destroyer program continues to make significant progress achieving key shipbuilding milestones, completing ship generator light-off on Sept. 23, for the first-of-class ship, the future USS Zumwalt, a Naval Sea Systems Command spokesman said in a Sept. 25 release.

    The lead ship, DDG 1000, is 92 percent complete and currently in the test and activation phase of construction at General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works. The ship is successfully activating its fuel systems, advanced induction motors (AIM) and generators with fuel onload and AIM light-off completed in July. The generators are used to produce the electricity required to operate the ship — the first Navy surface combatant to employ and innovative Integrated Power System (IPS). Key design features that make the IPS architecture unique include the ability to provide power to propulsion, ship’s service and combat system loads from the same gas turbine generators.

    “Light-off of DDG 1000’s generators is a critical step forward in the activation, test and trials of the ship’s systems,” said CAPT Jim Downey, the Navy’s DDG 1000 program manager. “With deliberate and incremental test and activation, the DDG 1000 team is systematically retiring risk and preparing this highly complex ship for at-sea testing and eventual transfer to the fleet.”

    Completion of generator light-off represents the latest electrical system milestone in an effort that began years ago with early prototype testing at the Naval Ships Systems Engineering Station Land Based Test Site in Philadelphia. Lessons learned from this effort guided activation events onboard DDG 1000 including energizing the high voltage power system, lighting off the port AIM utilizing shore power to demonstrate operation of the propulsion motor system, and continual testing of the engineering control system responsible for the automated control of the engineering plant. Most recently, successful testing of the fuel oil service and transfer system allowed for the onload of fuel utilized in the light-off event.

    Test and activation of the ship’s systems will steadily continue, with activation of the ship’s computer system, the Total Ship Computing Environment planned for later this fall. Zumwalt will begin at-sea testing in 2015 off the coast of Maine and is expected to arrive in San Diego in the 2016 timeframe for an extensive period of operational integration with the fleet.
    SEAPOWER Magazine Online

  2. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfgun View Post
    Posted: September 25, 2014 3:35 PM

    Destroyer Zumwalt Completes Generator Light-Off

    BATH, Maine — The Navy’s Zumwalt-class (DDG 1000) destroyer program continues to make significant progress achieving key shipbuilding milestones, completing ship generator light-off on Sept. 23, for the first-of-class ship, the future USS Zumwalt, a Naval Sea Systems Command spokesman said in a Sept. 25 release.

    The lead ship, DDG 1000, is 92 percent complete and currently in the test and activation phase of construction at General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works. The ship is successfully activating its fuel systems, advanced induction motors (AIM) and generators with fuel onload and AIM light-off completed in July. The generators are used to produce the electricity required to operate the ship — the first Navy surface combatant to employ and innovative Integrated Power System (IPS). Key design features that make the IPS architecture unique include the ability to provide power to propulsion, ship’s service and combat system loads from the same gas turbine generators.

    “Light-off of DDG 1000’s generators is a critical step forward in the activation, test and trials of the ship’s systems,” said CAPT Jim Downey, the Navy’s DDG 1000 program manager. “With deliberate and incremental test and activation, the DDG 1000 team is systematically retiring risk and preparing this highly complex ship for at-sea testing and eventual transfer to the fleet.”

    Completion of generator light-off represents the latest electrical system milestone in an effort that began years ago with early prototype testing at the Naval Ships Systems Engineering Station Land Based Test Site in Philadelphia. Lessons learned from this effort guided activation events onboard DDG 1000 including energizing the high voltage power system, lighting off the port AIM utilizing shore power to demonstrate operation of the propulsion motor system, and continual testing of the engineering control system responsible for the automated control of the engineering plant. Most recently, successful testing of the fuel oil service and transfer system allowed for the onload of fuel utilized in the light-off event.

    Test and activation of the ship’s systems will steadily continue, with activation of the ship’s computer system, the Total Ship Computing Environment planned for later this fall. Zumwalt will begin at-sea testing in 2015 off the coast of Maine and is expected to arrive in San Diego in the 2016 timeframe for an extensive period of operational integration with the fleet.
    SEAPOWER Magazine Online
    Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!! There people, in uniform yet, using the term "light off" in a totally inappropriate manner. There is only one type of equipment that one can "light off," and that's a boiler. Everything else, you "start."

  3. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertswo View Post
    Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!! There people, in uniform yet, using the term "light off" in a totally inappropriate manner. There is only one type of equipment that one can "light off," and that's a boiler. Everything else, you "start."
    LOL, I could see this coming after I saw it earlier...

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertswo View Post
    Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!! There people, in uniform yet, using the term "light off" in a totally inappropriate manner.
    Damn four-stripers!
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor, timid spirits who know neither victory nor defeat ~ Theodore Roosevelt

  5. #125
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    BATH, MAINE — The ship is plainly visible from Front Street, across the Route 1 bridge in downtown Bath. Nothing like this angular, almost hulking giant has ever been seen here, even after well over a century of shipbuilding at Bath Iron Works.

    The futuristic shape of the Zumwalt, DDG 1000, has become familiar after more than a decade of graphics presentations and artist drawings, and models of the destroyer have been a staple at naval expositions for years. But now the whole ship is coming together, all construction blocks assembled and set afloat. People walk her decks and she rises and falls with the tide as all that planning turns into a real thing. She’ll take to the sea for the first time in the spring.

    The epitome of naval stealth design, Zumwalt’s sleek shapes belie a ship filled with new features. Walking aboard, one of the first impressions is one of size — she is by far the largest ship ever called a “destroyer.” So, one would think, she must be roomy inside.

    “You know, she is almost 16,000 tons, 610 feet long, about 81 feet abeam, you imagine that everything must be spacious,” said Capt. James Kirk, Zumwalt’s prospective commanding officer. “But when you get on her, you realize she is packed full of the equipment necessary to operate her and give her the capability to fight.”
    Below decks, a main deck passageway is large and wide, designed to quickly and easily move supplies and ammunition to storage rooms below. But the forward hull is also taken up with the automatic reload equipment and shell magazines for the ship’s two 155mm advanced gun systems — the biggest guns built into a naval ship since World War II.

    The guns own the centerline real estate that, on other missile ships, is taken up by vertical launch systems. On Zumwalt, missile cells flank the guns, lining the sides of the hull fore and aft in a peripheral arrangement. Between the guns and the missile, that pretty much takes up the forward hull.

    Amidships, the knife-like bow turns into a full, wide hull, crammed with power equipment. Zumwalt is an electric ship, with 78.5 megawatts of installed power — an unheard-of feature in a destroyer. Power units are arranged throughout the ship, reminding everyone of the different nature of its integrated power system, able to shift power from propulsion to sensors to weapons.

    The bridge sits low on the superstructure on the O2 level, and will be staffed by a minimum of three watchstanders. During a visit this summer, shipbuilders were busy installing the windows, specially designed to withstand the green water expected to come as the narrow bow slices through, rather than rides, over waves.

    DDG 1000: In pictures

    Behind the bridge, the ship mission center is taking shape, but scaffolding rose through the space’s two levels. More crew members will be assigned here than any other place, some working in a mezzanine area on the O3 level.

    As expected, the machinery spaces are big — but surprisingly crowded. The power plant features two large MT-30 main turbine generators, two MT-5 auxiliary turbine generators and two advanced induction motors to generate all that electrical power.

    Aft, a large boat bay sits under the flight deck, able to stow two 11-meter rigid-hull inflatable boats on a ramp with a third parked in the overhead. Doors in the transom open to extend the ramp to launch and recover boats at ship speeds of up to 13 knots.

    Throughout, Zumwalt features systems that open or retract or lift or lower, many of them classified or restricted. A towed array system and towed torpedo countermeasures system will be installed aft. Side doors to handle underway replenishment will open to extend handling gear, special radars will rise on retractable masts.

    Except for the flight deck, sailors will rarely appear topside when the ship is underway. Foredeck lifelines will be retracted when the ship is at sea. Embarkation and mooring stations are hidden behind doors in the hull.

    One concession to conventionality has been to install a small mast at the forward end of the superstructure to carry the national ensign, a change made more convenient when a small conical structure carrying sensors was deleted.

    While Zumwalt certainly looks like no other destroyer, Kirk insists she’ll be able to mix easily with the fleet.

    “From a lot of different aspects, she is a multimission destroyer capable of doing the same kinds of missions that the cruisers and the Arleigh Burkes [destroyers] can do,” he said.

    “What makes her unique is the power she generates, the survivability that is inherent within lots of her features, and then that gun. That is a unique aspect for this ship.”

    The guns, however, while not designed to shoot at moving targets, will give the three ships of the Zumwalt class an entirely new capability, Kirk insisted.

    “When you are carrying hundreds of rounds, your ability to influence what is going on is significantly greater,” he explained. “If you are carrying so many Tomahawk missiles and 600 rounds of long-range land-attack projectiles, you have a significant advantage. I think that is pretty unique.”

    One area in which the ship will not be as capable is in its ability to provide area air defense, covering other ships over a wide area.

    “It is limited,” Kirk acknowledged. “It is not the same air defense as the cruiser. But it is still quite capable.” All indications, he said, show “that her ability to do air defense is going to be pretty capable but not with the same sort of ranges because of the deletion of volume search radar. You just do not have the same capability as on a destroyer or a cruiser with the Aegis SPY-1 radar.”

    The ship’s flight deck is considerably larger than Burke-class destroyers.

    “She has got a flight deck almost two times the size of a Burke’s,” Kirk noted. That, along with carrying a special operating force, “is pretty significant. You take it altogether. If I had a military problem that needed to be solved, there are definitely missions this ship can do that other ships would not be as well-suited to do.”

    One big question to be answered when the ship goes to sea will be how its unusual tumblehome hull — in which the hull narrows above the waterline — handles in the open ocean.

    “This hull form is going to have different stability characteristics about its maneuvering that we are going to have to be very conscious of,” Kirk said. “And I am confident, from what I see, that we are going to have the guidance and technical information we need to have in order to fly her, in order to maneuver her properly given the weather that is around us.”

    The Zumwalts will have maneuvering limitations just like any ship, he said.

    “If you have a certain wave action with certain speeds, you can have a dynamic stability that becomes compromised,” he explained. “Then you need to make sure you are using the proper amount of turn and speed to limit risks to the dynamic stability of the ship. And I am comfortable with what I see that we know how to operate the ship in whatever seas we face.”

    Design changes
    At Naval Sea Systems Command in Washington, DDG 1000 Program Manager Capt. James Downey oversees the engineering team that handles all technical matters with the ships. He ticked off several key design or concept changes that have taken place.

    “In 2010, we took out the volume search radar, the S-band sensor in the dual-band radar system, leaving the SPY-3 X-band radar, which received modifications from Raytheon to increase its volume-search capabilities. The system, installed for testing at Wallops Island, Virginia, will be tested next year on the self-defense test ship Paul F. Foster, which already has conducted a series of SPY-3 tests,” Downey said. Those earlier tests, he said, “went really well.”

    A series of other changes enabled designers to take out about 50 tons from the deckhouse, Downey added, allowing the shift from composite construction to steel in the third ship of the class, the Lyndon B. Johnson. The second ship is named the Michael Monsoor.

    Part of that weight reduction came from a change in the ship’s secondary gun system, used for close-in defense. Originally, the Mark 110 57mm gun was specified for the ship — the same weapon used as the primary gun system in littoral combat ships and Coast Guard national security cutters.

    But Downey also saw the Mark 46 30mm gun, in use aboard San Antonio-class amphibious ships, as a contender for DDG 1000. The smaller gun, he said, “was half the weight, half the cost, and had more offensive combat capability” than the 57mm. “I asked the team to go back and relook at the gun issue.”

    The analysis, he said, showed that the capability of the 57mm “was overstated in the model,” while the 30mm was understated. “They saw a system that did not meet the requirement anymore and one that did.”

    A bonus, he pointed out, was a reduction of 24 tons by using the 30mm guns.

    The size of the crew continues to be discussed. The ship is fitted with 186 racks, or berths, but the official crew size is 130, with another 28 people in the aviation detachment. Experience with other first-of-class deliveries, Downey said, could lead to a larger crew. The program already has laid out a crew organization with 17 additional crew members, for a crew total of 147, or 175 with the aviation detachment.

    The added crew members, Downey said, would come in engineering ratings, gunnery, information systems technology, network and communications areas. A decision, he added, would need to be made in time to be included in the fiscal 2016 budget request.

    Other racks have been provided for command and special operations teams. Originally, no flag — or command — facilities were to have been provided, but quarters for a destroyer squadron commodore and a small staff of six officers has been provided. A space able to accommodate 14 special operations team members and their gear is another feature of the ships.

    The Zumwalts also were to have been led by an officer at the rank of commander, in line with all other destroyers. That has now changed, and a higher-ranking captain will drive the Zumwalts, on par with cruiser commands.

    The ships, Downey explained, are a “pretty significant asset, with pretty complex capability, a very high level of training needed for the crew and officers and enlisted,” requiring a more senior officer to lead.

    A decision on whether the 1000s would be a “fleet up” command, where the executive officer is expected to succeed the commanding officer, could also become a consideration. “With the complexity of the ship, that is something I would say should certainly be considered,” Downey said. “Nothing formal has been decided there, but that is, I think, a very real possibility.”

    The DDG 1000 program is phenomenally expensive — by the time the three ships are delivered, the Navy will have spent about $22 billion on research and development (R&D), procurement and construction, funded over more than 20 years. Planners early on envisioned 28 ships, then seven, then two and finally three — all from the same R&D pool. The Navy claimed the Zumwalts would cost an average of $3.3 billion each, but numerous critics warned they could hit $5 billion apiece or more.

    So far at least, those predictions are not coming true, with costs for Zumwalt, Downey said, “around $3.4 billion.”

    For the entire program, “I am 3 percent below the [cost] objective,” Downey claimed. “The objective is the low baseline number and the threshold is at the higher end.”

    Sometime in the spring, Bath expects to take Zumwalt to sea for the first time, beginning a series of engineering and systems trials that would last through the summer, and the Navy hopes to receive Zumwalt before the end of 2015.

    Even then, the ship won’t be complete, with elements of the combat system and computing environment still requiring work. But the time is coming when the hulking ship across Front Street will head down the Kennebec River, and the world will begin to see an entirely different kind of warship.
    Meet the Zumwalt: The Navy's stealth destroyer will go to sea next spring | Navy Times | navytimes.com

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfgun View Post
    As expected, the machinery spaces are big — but surprisingly crowded. The power plant features two large MT-30 main turbine generators, two MT-5 auxiliary turbine generators and two advanced induction motors to generate all that electrical power.
    This guy is an idiot. Motors do not generate power, they are users. The motors he is referring to drive the ship's screws.

    Beyond that, there was a rather blunt admission that she can't really participate in fleet defense. That's not good. Not good at all. A big, fecking target if you ask me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertswo View Post
    This guy is an idiot. Motors do not generate power, they are users. The motors he is referring to drive the ship's screws.

    Beyond that, there was a rather blunt admission that she can't really participate in fleet defense. That's not good. Not good at all. A big, fecking target if you ask me.
    Perhaps, with time the S-Band radars will be installed, as they are in continued development for the CVN-78 Class? I think they just wanted to get the S-band off the balance sheet for this class to keep the costs somewhat under control. I guess time will tell?

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    Quote Originally Posted by surfgun View Post
    Perhaps, with time the S-Band radars will be installed, as they are in continued development for the CVN-78 Class? I think they just wanted to get the S-band off the balance sheet for this class to keep the costs somewhat under control. I guess time will tell?
    Besides ASW, which she ought to be pretty good at with those quiet motors, it appears that her greatest use is in strike warfare and NGFS. I mean, that's fine, but for a ship that size to not be at least as capable as an Arleigh Burke in AAW just seems criminal to me.

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    So the 30mm gun has more offensive capability than the 57mm gun?

    I would like to see that study.

    If its true, then why stick with the 57mm on LCS?
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    So the 30mm gun has more offensive capability than the 57mm gun?

    I would like to see that study.

    If its true, then why stick with the 57mm on LCS?
    Yet another confirmation that the LCS is a limp dick POS; and this thing is not much more than an equally limp dick missile barn for use in support of land warfare. What a waste of money and effort.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desertswo View Post
    This guy is an idiot. Motors do not generate power, they are users. The motors he is referring to drive the ship's screws.

    Beyond that, there was a rather blunt admission that she can't really participate in fleet defense. That's not good. Not good at all. A big, fecking target if you ask me.
    a modern version of the "arsenal ship"..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gun Grape View Post
    So the 30mm gun has more offensive capability than the 57mm gun?

    I would like to see that study.

    If its true, then why stick with the 57mm on LCS?
    you'd think the weight savings that is stated in that article (30 mm being half the weight) would also be a huge benefit for LCS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bfng3569 View Post
    you'd think the weight savings that is stated in that article (30 mm being half the weight) would also be a huge benefit for LCS.
    Looking at the specs for the various guns, the 30mm has to be much less than half the weight of the 57mm, unless the Mk 46 is incredibly heavy and/or they are planning on having an awful lot of ammunition on hand. The 30mm gun by itself only weighs about 350lbs. The 57mm mount empty weighs almost the same as the 76mm OTO mount.

  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertswo View Post
    Besides ASW, which she ought to be pretty good at with those quiet motors, it appears that her greatest use is in strike warfare and NGFS. I mean, that's fine, but for a ship that size to not be at least as capable as an Arleigh Burke in AAW just seems criminal to me.
    It's going to require her to operate from well outside the range of enemy aircraft or in an area where we have achieved air superiority or in a sag. Tomahawk and it's follow on replacement gives her that capability, but the AGS still puts her well within range of shore based aircraft if she is operating in the strike role. She would make an excellent asw platform, but I'd like to see her with over the side torpedoes in case a sub is able to close in with her.

    What about defense against asm's? Will the ESSMS be sufficient? Any thoughts on that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonBelt View Post
    ...would make an excellent asw platform, but I'd like to see her with over the side torpedoes in case a sub is able to close in with her.
    Why not the RUM-139C VLA (Vertical Launch Anti-submarine rocket) which carries the MK 54 Lightweight Torpedo?

    edit: Looks like RUM-139C VLA may be included. See below.

    http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/z1/zumwalt-i.htm

    "...DDG 1000: displacement 14,564; length 610'; beam 80.7'; draft 28'; speed 30 knots; complement 148; armament 20 Mk 57 Vertical Launch System modules (80 cells) for RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles, BGM-109E Tactical Tomahawks, and RUM-139C Anti-Submarine Rockets, two 155 millimeter Advanced Gun Systems, two Mk 46 30 millimeter Naval Weapon Systems, and two Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk helicopters or one Seahawk and up to three Northrop Grumman RQ-8A Fire Scout Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles; class Zumwalt..."

    Navy Fact Sheet: Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rocket ASROC (VLA) Missile
    http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_pr...00&ct=2&page=1
    Last edited by JRT; 04 Oct 14, at 23:42.
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