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Thread: Final deployment for Enterprise (CVN-65)

  1. #46
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    Rendering Honors

    By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Peter Melkus, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs

    USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- Sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) committed the remains of 11 veterans, including two former Enterprise Sailors, to their final resting place in the Atlantic Ocean during a burial at sea ceremony March 17.

    Those 'committed to the deep' included an Enterprise plankowner who served aboard the carrier during its maiden deployment in 1962, and a master chief master-at-arms assigned to Enterprise at the time of his death several months ago. All 11 service members received full military honors at the ceremony.

    "It's always a privilege to be asked to conduct a burial at sea, but this is the first one I've done involving someone I actually knew," said Cmdr. John Owen, command chaplain. "To commit a shipmate I've served with made this ceremony much sadder and more meaningful."

    Nearly all of the master-at-arms aboard Enterprise attended the ceremony to pay final respects to their shipmate and master chief.

    They were joined by a majority of the carrier's Chief Petty Officers Mess, on hand to honor a member of the Mess as his remains were committed to the deep.

    "It was an honor to pay tribute to a good shipmate and friend today," said Chief Master-at-Arms Larry Harper, a ceremony participant. "We feel like we've lost a member of our family and he has been greatly missed."

    Though they were not originally scheduled to participate in the ceremony, Harper said members of Enterprise's security team insisted on playing any roles they could.

    "I'm very impressed and moved by the way people step up and volunteer to go out of their way to honor fellow service members aboard this ship, and today's ceremony was another perfect example of that," said Owen. "I think everyone feels good about how we appropriately honored these people, and I'm always proud to be part of such a timeless naval tradition. It's through ceremonies like these that we live out what it means to be true shipmates."

  2. #47
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Randy J. Savarese, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs

    USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- The aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) traversed rough seas and high winds while transiting through the Strait of Gibraltar March 23.

    Although the passage was rescheduled for early in the morning, allowing Enterprise to transit with less traffic in the strait, weather conditions remained severe, making the transit challenging.

    "The wind can push you off course if it's strong enough and the waves and sea state are obviously going to be affected," said Quartermaster Seaman Robert J. Stallcup, a master helmsman, who was supervising and training junior quartermasters while piloting Enterprise through the strait.

    In order to be a master helmsman, Sailors must complete an extensive qualification process. The Enterprise uses opportunities such as the strait transit to train Sailors using the full range of challenges presented.

    "Five minutes into the transit, the quartermaster at the helm got a feel for the ship, and based on what the sea was doing, he was able to counteract it and kept the ship as straight as possible," said Stallcup.

    Although this was a successful transit, problems can arise from both weather conditions and high traffic. Stallcup is no stranger to either challenge.

    "It's one of the easier transits, but I've always done it through bad weather," said Stallcup. "I can never get a good day. It's pretty challenging and you have to stay focused. You can't look at the strait or the mountains. You have to pay close attention to what you're doing."

    Something Quartermaster 3rd Class Thomas J. Sanborn, the chart petty officer, reinforces from a navigational standpoint.

    "The weather changes your winds and it changes the water running under the ship; so it changes where we're getting pushed around," said Sanborn. "So any turns that we make, we need to make sure are on time. Any slight mistake could be bad."

    Navigating a ship this large through the strait is a coordinated effort that requires input from many different specialties including the Aerographer's Mates (AG), the ship's weather forecasters and observers, who are especially vital on days like today.

    It is the AG's job to analyze meteorological and oceanographic data from satellites, radar and the vast amount of meteorological and oceanographic products and charts.

    "They use this data to predict weather conditions and how they may affect operations, and then present this data to not only Enterprise, but all the ships and units attached to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1," said Aerographer's Mate 1st class Craig P. Hawkins, a forecast duty officer aboard Enterprise.

    "Today's event called a 'Levante' caused very strong funneling of easterly winds through the Strait of Gibraltar," said Hawkins. "It's not uncommon to see funneling in this gap, but certain meteorological conditions this morning favored a very strong 'Levante' wind event."

    Weather observers aboard Enterprise recorded wind gusts as high as 46 knots during the transit, but when added to the ship's speed, the gusts felt closer to 50 plus knots on the flight deck.

    "Winds in combination with rough seas made this transit more challenging than usual," said Hawkins. "Forecasting the strong winds days in advance helped the strike group better prepare for what was to come and plan accordingly."

    Proper planning and quick reflexes by the ship's crew made the recent transit successful.

    "I think the transit went really well despite the weather," said Sanborn. "This was well thought out by the chain of command and everyone involved did a great job.
    http://www.navy.mil/view_single.asp?id=120165
    Last edited by surfgun; 28 Mar 12, at 02:03.

  3. #48
    Regular drivinfool's Avatar
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    I took some pictures of Big E leaving Norfolk, and I will post them up as soon as I am allowed.

  4. #49
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    A sad way to bump a thread.

    Sailor found dead aboard carrier Enterprise
    Staff report
    Posted : Saturday Jun 9, 2012 14:40:05 EDT
    An enlisted sailor aboard the aircraft carrier Enterprise, which is currently deployed to 5th Fleet and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, was found dead Friday, the Defense Department said Saturday.

    Master Chief Petty Officer Richard J. Kessler Jr., 47, of Gulfport, Fla., was found in his berthing compartment, officials said. He was assigned to Enterprise as a logistics specialist.

    No further information was immediately available.

  5. #50
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    So, the Navy has now figured that Enterprise is on her 25th deployment.
    By USS Enterprise Public Affairs
    USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- Aug. 3, marks the 50th anniversary of the first deployment of USS Enterprise (CVN 65), and historians recently discovered the actual number of deployments is higher than commonly reported.

    Now as the Big E continues her final deployment, scores of Sailors and historians are reviewing and double checking all aspects of the carrier's storied career.

    The number of arrested landings, historic milestones, major evolutions, and, yes, even number of deployments are being checked and double checked for accuracy. As the Navy entered into the digital age, many of the historical documents associated with the carrier were made available online.

    Cases in point are the command history reports, which outline the milestones and accomplishments that occur over each calendar year. Research into these and other documents have led researchers to a startling new discovery.

    Tracing the number of deployments that Enterprise has completed would seem like a relatively easy task - simply tally up the number from the command history reports. Unfortunately, a few format changes over the years made for a task a bit more challenging than expected.

    According to retired Navy captain Todd Creekman, executive director of the Naval Historical Foundation in Washington D.C., researchers at the foundation have unearthed some surprising news.

    "In reviewing Enterprise's operational history, we made an interesting discovery" Creekman said. "All the current reports say that the ship is on her 22nd deployment. Actually, it is on the 25th deployment."

    Research from the Naval Historical and Heritage Command's (NHHC) online database and other reports reveal that the carrier has "been there, done that" more often than commonly thought.

    "We've run it by NHHC historian Mark Evans and it matches his data," Creekman said.

    As researchers worked to piece together what happened, it appeared that a focus on the ship's WestPac deployments led to the error.

    In a number of accounts, including command history reports, a particular deployment would be listed, for example, as "the tenth WestPac deployment," which would be accurate counting from the ship's first 1965-66 epic "first nuclear carrier in combat" deployment to the Vietnam War.

    The carrier completed its fourteenth and last sequential WestPac in 1990, before entering Newport News Shipyard in 1990 for the ship's third refueling.

    Following the final refueling, Enterprise made Norfolk, Va., her homeport once again and only made deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean and Arabian Gulf.

    "The problem began when later history reports used the same number sequence but dropped "WestPac" from the description," Evans explained. "The refueling reports failed to re-account for the three deployments Big E made to the Mediterranean Sea between 1962-1964."

    One example is the command history report from the ship's historic 2001 deployment, which reads: "On April 25, the Enterprise Navigation Department set Special Sea and Anchor Detail to begin a historic 17th deployment for operations in the Mediterranean Sea, Arabian Gulf and North Arabian Sea."

    This was, in fact, the ship's 20th deployment.

    As the 51-year-old carrier steams along today on its 25th and final deployment, researchers continue to verify and cross reference important facts and milestones to ensure accuracy.

    "It's already exciting to be a part of Enterprise's final deployment, but each day we are discovering more and more about the rich history of which we are a part," said Capt. William C. Hamilton, Enterprise's commanding officer. "We estimate over 200,000 Sailors and Marines have served aboard the Big E, and every one has helped in making her the legend we serve aboard today. We are a very, very proud crew."

    The eighth ship to bear the name Enterprise is scheduled to inactivate from service on December 1, 2012, in a Ceremony in Norfolk, Va., in preparation for her defueling and decommissioning in 2016.

    For more information about Enterprise and a detailed account of her history, visit Welcome to Navy Forces Online Public Sites.
    >

  6. #51
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Thanks, I really appreciate the updates you provide on the Big "E" ...

  7. #52
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    From Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs
    NORFOLK (NNS) -- After 51 years of distinguished service, the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) will inactivate on Dec. 1, 2012, in a ceremony to be held at Norfolk Naval Station, in Norfolk, Va.

    The inactivation ceremony will be the last official public event for the ship, and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 Sailors who served aboard. Details of the actual ceremony are still being finalized; however, numerous dignitaries and thousands of veterans of the ship are expected to attend the event.

    Commissioned on November 25, 1961, the eighth ship to bear the illustrious name Enterprise, the "Big E" was the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

    A veteran of 25 deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, Pacific Ocean, and the Middle East, Enterprise has served in nearly every major conflict to take place during her history. From the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962 to six deployments in support of the Vietnam conflict through the Cold War and the Gulf Wars, Enterprise was there. On Sept. 11, 2001, Enterprise aborted her transit home from a long deployment after the terrorist attacks, and steamed overnight to the North Arabian Sea. Big 'E' once again took her place in history when she launched the first strikes in direct support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

    All Enterprise veterans, their families, shipyard workers, and friends of Enterprise are invited to register to attend the inactivation week events and the ceremony on the ship's website, Welcome to Navy Forces Online Public Sites. Tickets to the events will be on a first available basis.

    For more information on USS Enterprise, her legendary history, and Inactivation Week events, please visit Welcome to Navy Forces Online Public Sites.

  8. #53
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    Looks like Enterprise is heading home.

    By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class (SW) Brian G. Reynolds, Enterprise Carrier Strike Group Public Affairs
    USS ENTERPRISE, At Sea (NNS) -- Aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65) has been the first to do a lot of things. The "Big E" was the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the first carrier to respond to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

    On April 29, 1986, Enterprise did something that no other nuclear-powered carrier had ever done - she transited the Suez Canal, the world's largest man-made canal, adding another first to an already long list of accomplishments.

    The 1986 transit brought Enterprise back into the Mediterranean for the first time in 22 years, as she shifted homeports from Alameda, Calif., back to Norfolk, Va., where she was originally commissioned in 1961.

    Twenty-six years later, on Oct. 12, the "Big E" passed through the Suez Canal for the final time as she transitioned from the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) to U.S. 6th Fleet AOR, entering the Mediterranean Sea for the last time.

    The transit marks the beginning of the last leg of the carrier's historic 25th and final deployment, after seven months of operations at sea.

    The Suez Canal is a 120-mile long, 79-foot-deep canal that runs through Egypt's Sinai Peninsula, allowing mariners to transit from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea, and vice versa.

    Because the canal is so shallow and narrow, the transit puts the skills of even the most seasoned helmsman to the test, as the canal was not originally designed to accommodate ships the size of an aircraft carrier. In fact, the evolution usually takes anywhere from 14-20 hours to complete.

    "Planning for this type of evolution starts months out to try to minimize any hiccups," said Chief Quartermaster Craig J. Bowman. "We (Navigation department) lay out the ship's planned track with proposed or planned times to be at certain places. Other departments on the ship take the information we provide and plan when and where they can or can't do evolutions - or when they need to shut off or stop certain services."

    Because Enterprise was the first to make the historic journey through the Suez Canal, those involved in its current transit believe that there is a bit of reverence in having the honor to take the "Big E" through "the Ditch" for the final time.

    "To bring Enterprise through the Suez Canal for the last time is certainly an honor," said Cmdr. Donald Kennedy, Enterprise's navigator. "For more than 50 years, Big E Sailors have expertly stood the long watches required to navigate Enterprise safely. To be among the last to see her through the Suez Canal will no doubt be one of the most memorable experiences of my career."

    Many "Big E" crewmembers agree that it is an honor to be involved with the final cruise and Suez Canal transit of the world's first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The cruise marks a milestone in not only their careers, but their lives as well.

    "Being involved in the planning of the transit is something that no one can take away from me or anyone else on the Navigation team," said Bowman. "I went through as a QM1 (quartermaster first class) and I am coming out as a QMC (chief quartermaster). Just adding that to the transit makes this that much more memorable for me."

    Enterprise is scheduled to return to its homeport of Norfolk at the end of its current deployment to begin its inactivation process after 51 years of service.

  9. #54
    In Memoriam/Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
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    I didn't see a picture here and thought this thread and the ship deserved one:
    Attachment 30482
    "If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

  10. #55
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    So apropo...

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    Even more so, since ex-Long Beach was just sold for scrap last month.

  12. #57
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
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    Task Force 1. Both Bainbridge and Long Beach have gone to the scrappers.

    And look. F-8s on the flight deck.
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

  13. #58
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Besides Crusaders, Phantoms and Skyhawks are those a bunch of Vigilantes at the stern...

  14. #59
    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Besides Crusaders, Phantoms and Skyhawks are those a bunch of Vigilantes at the stern...
    Yes those are.

    But remember "When your out of F-8s, your out of Fighters" The last of the gunslingers
    Its called Tourist Season. So why can't we shoot them?

  15. #60
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    Some more pictures of Enterprise

    A more eclectic collection of ships you will be hard pressed to find.
    Attachment 30509

    Enterprise remembers Task Force One
    Attachment 30510

    Just a damn fine looking ship
    Attachment 30511
    Far better it is to dare mighty things, than to take rank with those poor, timid spirits who know neither victory nor defeat ~ Theodore Roosevelt

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