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Thread: USS Hornet blog

  1. #16
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    hand scrapping

  2. #17
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Was down at the ship at 7:30 this Sunday morning. Never down there on Sunday anymore since having a little boy who is 2 1/2 years old and the need to watch him on Sunday from 1:00 PM onward. Rusty asked a favor of me and so I needed to go down to leave a message on the door of Rick in charge of volunteers. Can't rely on the phone message system and getting him on the phone, Monday, could be hit or miss. The taped message will be hard to miss.

    After that went to the machine shop as I was sure Tom would be in there. He was finishing some work on a gutter cover ( first two shots) to put up in Mount 51 when we place the 3"/50 cal twin in place. Started talking about O11 and Pri-Fly which got him up to take a look. Brought the saw to cut out some metal lip ( next two) in areas to create drainage to minimize standing water. The Navy didn't design these flat areas with the idea that there would be standing water and the ship not rocking. Cut six areas: 3-4" sections, 1-6" section, 1-14" section and 1-18" section. The large sections will get metal welded back in complete with a water diverter. Those I'll grind flat on Wednesday when back.

    The fifth shot shows where water collects and the rust it creates. This particular area is pretty thin and when you hit it with a hammer and the debris jumps into the air. All other places are 1/4" steel deck. Last shot shows the leak in Pri-Fly. Tom saw the caulking used by the ships paid crew. He wanted the stuff off to see under. Sure enough these were thin patches by the Navy and two of the four patches managed to get dime size holes. I needed to leave at that point and Tom was going to grind them flat and weld 3 x3 square plates on top to seal for good.

  3. #18
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    next 2

  4. #19
    Senior Contributor Stitch's Avatar
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    Mike, was that you working on top of the island with a hand grinder about 9:30 AM Sunday? You guys were making an awful lot of noise! We were that stupid group down at the front starboard 5/38" playing with the 5" shells. One of the docents, Phil, took us down to the rear of the 3rd Deck to see the gyroscopic compass room (behind the main galley); was that room right next to it where they worked on Sidewinders? I saw a plaque on the wall that said something about working on the nose and guidance system of Sidewinders.
    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

  5. #20
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Yes, that was Tom and I up there. Also, yes, to that room for working on the guidance system of sidewinders next to the gyro compartment.

    Talked with Tom today and he tells me those four patches covered cut off stuffing tubes. Ah ha. Seems those were there during the Apollo recoveries to power some special equipment mounted up there at the time. Then the equipment was removed with the tubes cut, and according to Tom, a patch just less than 1/16" thick was welded on top. Tom's patch is 1/4" thick.

  6. #21
    Senior Contributor Stitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Yes, that was Tom and I up there. Also, yes, to that room for working on the guidance system of sidewinders next to the gyro compartment.
    I ALMOST took a picture of you guys up there working, but I figured he chances of it being you up there were about 10-to-1, so I didn't; I am NOT going to Vegas!

    Any idea if the 5" upper shell handling room is on "the list"? It could use some attention. The shell hoists (from the armory) are still in place, but that's about it; the shell racks themselves are a shadow of their former self.

    BTW, the work you do is excellent; I am something of a pefectionist myself so, a lot of times, things simply don't get finished because "they're not good enough". Keep up the good work!
    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

  7. #22
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    I do have the mount area outside the room on my list. Strip the deck, the splinter shields, the bulkheads and the overheads of bad paint and then repaint using two part hardened paint. The inside is not on my list as it isn't in the Island and it isn't in immediate danger of damage from the elements.

    Here's an example of good enough. Three weeks ago the guys restoring the FM-2 Wildcat were riveting on a new end cap for one of the elevators. I looked at the backside and saw that the rivets weren't bucked either correctly or all the way. Pointed it out and was told the plane isn't going to fly and no one will see. Said that I have seen it and it only takes a few more seconds. They just looked at me and I walked away. Now when I built three new cowling panels from scratch for the TBM without any prior experience in anything having to do with planes I researched it first. Got the correct tools to cut out the panels and form the curve. Bought the correct Zeus fittings to attach them and tools from a guy in Fresno to make the countersink holes. Then after cutting out the holes for small access points, such as for oil, Tim and I riveted in the doors I made. He is A&P and me just a novice and I told him I want them to pass inspection. They did and the only people to see them is Tim and me.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Here's an example of good enough. Three weeks ago the guys restoring the FM-2 Wildcat were riveting on a new end cap for one of the elevators. I looked at the backside and saw that the rivets weren't bucked either correctly or all the way. Pointed it out and was told the plane isn't going to fly and no one will see. Said that I have seen it and it only takes a few more seconds. They just looked at me and I walked away. Now when I built three new cowling panels from scratch for the TBM without any prior experience in anything having to do with planes I researched it first. Got the correct tools to cut out the panels and form the curve. Bought the correct Zeus fittings to attach them and tools from a guy in Fresno to make the countersink holes. Then after cutting out the holes for small access points, such as for oil, Tim and I riveted in the doors I made. He is A&P and me just a novice and I told him I want them to pass inspection. They did and the only people to see them is Tim and me.
    The "Half A$$ed is good enough" attitude drives me crazy because it's usually a carryover of what they do for everything else in their life.

  9. #24
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    While we were standing just outside the pier area watching the Iowa, before we were invited inside, the Pacific Battleship board member was asking me what I was working on. Told him and he asked how I was dealing with removal of the rust and paint? Then asked what I was using for coatings to protect the areas against long term UV damage. Of course, he mentioned the use of a needle gun which I don't use. I am about 600 feet from a compressor down near the tire shop at the stern of the ship. Plus, since my ears already ring on a daily basis, I didn't need any long term loud noises around me. Of course the Iowa has been sitting less time than the Hornet and with less coats of paint so no rust bubbles from what I saw. Below is a shot of the rust thickness on the O11 Level and how I remove it inch by inch.

  10. #25
    Senior Contributor Stitch's Avatar
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    For those who care; here are my pictures from my visit onboard the Hornet last month:

    Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket
    "There is never enough time to do or say all the things that we would wish. The thing is to try to do as much as you can in the time that you have. Remember Scrooge, time is short, and suddenly, you're not there any more." -Ghost of Christmas Present, Scrooge

  11. #26
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    Here is a couple of shots of an aft trunk in the Island from at the O5 Level. This was not done by me but by another group of volunteers 4 years ago. That was the same time I had just finished the Flag Level after 2 /12 years. This group was not supposed to be up here by the Head of Restoration sent them up anyway. It wasn't long after this that there was a confrontation between the very elderly Head of Restoration, the COO, the Head of Volunteers on my side and me. The first two weren't happy with my go it alone method as other volunteers complained I was too particular. The Head of Restoration reminded me I signed a paper to follow his procedures and I told him I signed it to get him out of my hair. The COO said maybe I should leave the ship and I told him it would be better if he left so I could finish what I was doing. The Head of Volunteers backed me up all the way and so did the CEO in the end. The Head of Restoration challenged me to show him where my work was better than his guys which I did. He hasn't been in my hair since.

    One shot of a 21MC that they considered restored. Another shot of the restored bulkhead and cables. Note paint is ever scraped off by them. The left shows a smooth area where I would scrap smooth to see if they would follow my lead the next day. Never did. This is the epitome of get it done and get it done fast.

  12. #27
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    My version. Strip the bulkheads when possible as in Flag. Strip paint from sound proofing fabric in the trunks. Restore all the chromate yellow boxes right down to the screws and name tags. Most name tags missing and what was left were terribly damaged so I had a trophy shop make them up for me. Put blanks in, so no bare spots, and when we figure out was it said I will bring them to the trophy shop. Last a 24MC that was taken home and disassemble for restoration. Missing most indicator lights, all name tags, brass hex cap nuts and a general mess at the time.

  13. #28
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    The toughest project I did on the ship. Cutting out and forming new engine panel covers for the TBM was easier than this. This was a sound proofing ceiling put in Flag Bridge for Nixon's visit during Apollo 11. Another quick and dirty job. Put plywood over the removable overhead panels and drill holes through the wood and the panels. Put a rubber washer and nut on the outside. Do this 60 times and then let sit 28 years in Bremerton. Result major water leaks and the tiles falling off soaking wet. Which is why they never wanted to open this Level to the public. In fact I was told to leave it alone. So I worked her for 2 years before the ship (COO), other than docents, knew about it. Today the ship hold small classes in here now on Naval history.

    First had to rip all the tiles off of which there are a lot. This job was actually done by my wife in 2003 her first year in the United States. Next remove bad plywood which was fit like a jigsaw puzzle. Then go outside and locate all screws and seal them. Last, buy the tiles and one by one cut and fit through the entire bridge. Of course this was after removing all the paint covering the brass clamps that hold down the removable panels. That was done with one small screwdriver as a paint scraper. Gently I might add.

  14. #29
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    Last for 11/17 is of weather decks. No one does anything for them over the years. Just the other day, our irascible old Navy ship electrician, came to me the other day and said the decks in the Island look good. Whoa, coming from him I was shocked. He too is very particular in his work and very vocal when electrical work isn't done right. The Island has lots of outside decks to work with along with bulkheads and overheads and cables. I need much more free time to catch up and finish. Below a deck untouched on port side and a deck on starboard side where I work. No visitors allowed on port side.

  15. #30
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Just ran across this 8mm home film of the Hornet in the 50's moving through San Francisco Bay. No hurricane bow yet, straight deck, twin 3"/50 mounts can be seen and a deck of Panthers and Skyraiders. Film says early 60's but clearly it isn't. Has to be between 1954 and no later than 1956 when she went in for her SBC-125 modernization. The fishing boat is sailing one direction and the Hornet is steaming the other.





    Obviously I still don't know how to embed the photo. Well I tried the video link anyway.
    Last edited by TopHatter; 16 Dec 11, at 21:57.

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