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Thread: Destroyers - Fletcher Class

  1. #3571
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    BM9 Wrote:
    Thanks for chiming in bbvet! It does clarify the the bilge blocks, however it raises another question, does the print mention the keel blocks? Or perhaps they were fleeted or removed say for example every third one removed and then the next dd they would shift to another third and so on. Or does the print a different docking position entirely?
    Here is another clip from the same drawing that shows the description of the three block positions and this is typical for all sets of blocks thruout the drawing:
    Name:  Docking Position_1.JPG
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    Somewhere recently I've read that the three positions allowed for a complete painting of the hull but obviously not during the same drydock period.

    Here is the Position #1 Table of Offsets for Side Blocks & Bilge Keel (there are 3 of these tables):
    Name:  Dock Position 1 Table of Offsets.JPG
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    These show the blocks at 12' intervals. There are also 3 tables for the blocks at 8' intervals and a table showing the hull openings below the DWL.

    I would love to attach the entire drawing, but it is LARGE!!!

    Hank
    Last edited by bbvet; 20 Jun 18, at 14:12.

  2. #3572
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbvet View Post
    BM9 Wrote:


    Here is another clip from the same drawing that shows the description of the three block positions and this is typical for all sets of blocks thruout the drawing:
    Name:  Docking Position_1.JPG
Views: 51
Size:  150.7 KB
    Somewhere recently I've read that the three positions allowed for a complete painting of the hull but obviously not during the same drydock period.

    Here is the Position #1 Table of Offsets for Side Blocks & Bilge Keel (there are 3 of these tables):
    Name:  Dock Position 1 Table of Offsets.JPG
Views: 53
Size:  66.6 KB
    These show the blocks at 12' intervals. There are also 3 tables for the blocks at 8' intervals and a table showing the hull openings below the DWL.

    I would love to attach the entire drawing, but it is LARGE!!!

    Hank
    Thank you for this it is great info and answers the question, They set the ship down in a different position each time they dry dock it. Thanks again!

  3. #3573
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    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    A look down into the Underwater sound room.. I think this is at Frame 26?
    Thank you bilgepump, I have a booklet of general plans for the Kidd from the 1950s and I attached 2 photos of the 2 levels of the sonar space. The computer and other equipment are on the third platform and the unit itself is in the hold. It appears that they installed a dogged hatch with a Top Hat, perhaps over the unit itself and was used to service it as moving around the hold area would not be very easy/ to confined....this would be a guess on my part but makes sense. In center photo you see a vent pipe with a valve on it. I imagine/not sure that valve remains closed until someone needs to enter the space at which time they open it to allow fresh air to circulate. I also imagine during GQ someone would have to come down there, to insure that valve is closed, as it has direct access to ships vent system.
    Does anyone have a photo or info on the unit itself? It would be interesting to know the reason for the Top Hat. my guess there is a rod or something skinny and tall on top of the unit..again a guess.Name:  IMG_6855.jpg
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Size:  821.9 KBName:  IMG_6856.jpg
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  4. #3574
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    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    The B & W photo illustrates well the cribbing used to rest the hull of a Fletcher DD. Thank you for posting this photo.
    The Kidd @ Baton Rouge is on my punch list to revisit and work my way under the hull to inspect the sea chest and scoops.

    Also a mention of the sonar in the previous post made me search for a couple of pictures... i.e. the sonar dome and the hatch to access the under water sound room, located A-4041/2 -C.
    bilgepump the images of the Kid on her cradle is fantastic...it shows the turn of the bilge where the hull forms to a vertical position, they show the bilge keel which is that length of steel kinda like a step on the hull that is attached to the hull right at the turn of the bilge and goes aft toward the propeller at a downward angle. This is one is on the Starboard side and there is one identical to this on the Port side. Note; the intent of the bilge keel is to improve the stability by arresting the ships roll as she made way through the ocean, these ships could heel over quite far before they righted themselves especially in confused sea or in storms.

    The caps/blanks with eyes on them are the hard blanks that I was referring to in a previous post. Bilgepumps's photos show the actual style blanks the navy required to seal the hulls of all inactive ships! Some were pretty large as shown in the second image the square hat which I believe os the #1 main condenser overboard. Any way it was quite a process to fabricate install and identify these things...the docking plan was very useful! I bet if one asks the Kidd curators they might find a docking plan that identifies the things in there files or the 6 part folder.

    An interesting point...in the days before cathodic protection when these ships were originally layed up the navy had a program where they would DD these ships periodically not sure but I beleave every 5 yrs of so. The hulls were cleaned and the systems tested. Since they had to remove the blanks to test the systems they attached rope or change to the eyes of the cap and the eyes on the hull so when the cap/blank was washed (burned) off the hull the cap would remain where it belonged so that it was easier to weld back up. Now this info read about and heard stories from older Philadelphia Shipyard workers, however it makes sense to tie up the caps. The Navy did go to great expense in those days to maintain ships that were "mothballed" (layed up) especially the ones that were in good condition. When I was stationed there the reserve fleet had cathodic protection, dd was considered an unnecessary expense Any way I digress.

    In that same image looking back by the propeller one will find the Strut the tail shaft/the tapered propeller shaft, goes through the strut bearing which is actually lined with wood ..lignum vitae. Not visible in the photo is a second smaller strut closer to the stern tube/where the tail shaft penetrates the hull. This wood was cut into staves and is installed in the bearing housings the strut bearings, are slid into the strut housings, and the shaft slid through the bearing. Lignum Vitae was a very dense wood that performed very well immersed in salt water. Believe it or not the lubrication for all these bearings is water. The the tail shaft journals were sleeved with a phosphor bronze sleeve I believe to retard/prevent corrosion and the shaft painted. Because of the war shortages perhaps the first shaft sleeves were steel however I am not sure of that. I do know that copper is way to soft and stainless or crescent was not really available during the war. In any case most ships got phosphor bronze in later years. Today Lignum Vietae is no longer used a special process rubber and special nylon staves are substituted.

    attached is the stern section of the outboard profile of the Kidd which clearly shows the the 2 struts and the tail shaft and propeller that pointy cap in the propeller is called a Dunce Cap. I does anyone have a drawing or an image of the stern tube castings on the fletcher. I will go out on a limb here and say that the gearings and sumner had the same arrangement since they have the same propulsion plant and are the same relative shp. My curiosity is getting the better of me.
    Name:  IMG_6857.jpg
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    Last edited by Boilermaker9; 20 Jun 18, at 21:45.

  5. #3575
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    Color pictures....

    [QUOTE=Boilermaker9;1042521]bilgepump the images of the Kid on her cradle is fantastic...it shows the turn of the bilge where the hull forms to a vertical position, they show the bilge keel which is that length of steel kinda like a step on the hull that is attached to the hull right at the turn of the bilge and goes aft toward the propeller at a downward angle.

    That blueprint of a Fletcher stern compliments the two attached pictures from the USS KIDD.
    The year that I visited the DD, the Mississippi River was staging high that Fall.
    Thus, the soft mud made a close inspection of the hull challenging.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  6. #3576
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    [QUOTE=blidgepump;1042529]
    Quote Originally Posted by Boilermaker9 View Post
    bilgepump the images of the Kid on her cradle is fantastic...it shows the turn of the bilge where the hull forms to a vertical position, they show the bilge keel which is that length of steel kinda like a step on the hull that is attached to the hull right at the turn of the bilge and goes aft toward the propeller at a downward angle.

    That blueprint of a Fletcher stern compliments the two attached pictures from the USS KIDD.
    The year that I visited the DD, the Mississippi River was staging high that Fall.
    Thus, the soft mud made a close inspection of the hull challenging.
    That is a beautiful view bilgepump of the Tail Shaft, entering the Strut Bearing, the Strut as it is attached to the hull, the Propeller, and the Dunce Cap. Under the dunce cap is a large nut that presses the propeller on to the keyed tapered end of the tail shaft.

    Also in he image is the rudder. The Rudder is hollow actually. The square plate under the Rudder Fairing is the access plate to the rudder nut..also it is a rather large nut with a fine thread. This nut holds the rudder up on the rudder post taper and key. The rudder post goes up through the stern frame and into the steering gear room/flat where it is attached to the steering engine/gear.

    Every ship I have been involved with carried the wrench needed to remove the propeller. Usually bolted to a bulkhead some where aft, this is a rather large wrench. Not all ships had the same size propeller nut, hence most ships carried their own. The rudder nut was easier to come across with.

  7. #3577
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    Another one of bilge pumps photos is the Steam Drum Head which shows clearly items I described before.

    1.The gage glasses I believe they were 6"and 12" glasses. Each window glass itself was 6 inches. The check man stayed glued to these glasses for his entire watch! To me it is oe boring job..but necessary back then.

    2.The [Baily single element feed water regulator ,which was used during GQ/Battle Stations, is the diagonal tube infront of the manhole painted silver with a fin attached to the tube that aids in cooling the tube.

    3. The Angle valve on the right side of the image is the surface blow valve. They generally blew down the the boiler once a watch to remove all the surface scum that accumulated. In those days they used NBC Navy Boiler Compound to treat the water and although it was simple to use and almost built proof it did leave contaminants behind therefore surface blowing was key. This valve discharged in to the bottom blow system for the fireroom and then exited the hull at about the turn of the bilge. This system was used for each boiler in the fireroom. Upon securing they would bottom blow each boiler through the same system.
    the side wall header center wall header and mud drum each had a similar valve that performed the action. I will get into a better explanation at a later time.

    4. In the upper right of the image is the economizer which is a large heat exchanger that raises the incoming feed water temp buy another 100 or so degrees.

    5. The black handled valve wheels are for the boiler drum vents.

    Sorry guys I loaded the wrong image! will find and post the correct one later today. again I apologize
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Boilermaker9; Today at 18:37. Reason: wrong image

  8. #3578
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    BM9, etc.

    Here is a clip from DD566's 1968 BoGP - 3rd Platform showing the same area (underwater sound room) as the KIDD plan view a couple posts back:
    Name:  DD566 1968 UW Sonar Rm.JPG
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    Compare this to the other one of KIDD during her war years - some differences, but still relatively similar. This view of STODDARD's 3rd platform from the 60's would have been typical of that arrangement for the FLETCHER's of that era.


    Hank

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    Name:  Aft_Fireroom_Steam_Drum_DSC02839.jpg
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    All-This is the image of bilgepump's that I was describing above, however the image I actually posted above (that shows the sides of the gage glasses) does show the the nuts, stud and the strong backs/dogs of the steam drum manhole cover described in an earlier post.

    This ship was decommissioned later in its life as the sheet metal covering over the drum insulation has been removed. After the war there was a ship alt to remove the sheet metal. I would also say that some of those studs on some flanges far exceed the 4 threads allowed! Not criticizing just saying!

    One other thing is the silver ball directly in front of the vertical grey 1" pipe is the datum chamber for the remote water level indicator(Yarway) on the lower level. I can not stress enough the importance of the water level and being maintained properly.

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    Name:  DSCN1255.JPG
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    In another one of bilgepumps images which by the way are extremely clear and just great images, we have the fuel oil heater described in an earlier post but the long and the short of it is this is a heat exchanger that runs on aux steam. It heats oil to burning temp somewhere around 235 degrees F. The sooner the the FOSH is put on the line and starts heating fuel oil the better it is for everyone. This is true especially lighting off from cold iron.

    You will also note there is a fuel oil meter that registers gallons it is that round object in-between the 3 red valve wheels. yep the navy was conscious of all the fuel they burned.

    When the temp was hard to maintain it was time to clean it...that was a chore. and a real dirty one at that. no one liked to clean the FOH , or do fire sides, or watersides. A lot of very dirty work

  11. #3581
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boilermaker9 View Post
    Name:  Aft_Fireroom_Steam_Drum_DSC02839.jpg
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    All-This is the image of bilgepump's that I was describing above, however the image I actually posted above (that shows the sides of the gage glasses) does show the the nuts, stud and the strong backs/dogs of the steam drum manhole cover described in an earlier post.

    This ship was decommissioned later in its life as the sheet metal covering over the drum insulation has been removed. After the war there was a ship alt to remove the sheet metal. I would also say that some of those studs on some flanges far exceed the 4 threads allowed! Not criticizing just saying!

    One other thing is the silver ball directly in front of the vertical grey 1" pipe is the datum chamber for the remote water level indicator(Yarway) on the lower level. I can not stress enough the importance of the water level and being maintained properly.
    I found a web site for the Uss Abbot that has a booklet of general plans, from the USS Sigsbee that shows the "Sound room" and the lower platform has " supersonic projectors". I do not know anything about this things this is contained in the "rod meter" compartment, rod meter is I believe a speed log called a "Pit Sword" that was raised and lowered entering and leaving port.
    Didn't sonar development take off in the late 60's early 70's and get pretty sophisticated?

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