Page 234 of 249 FirstFirst ... 225226227228229230231232233234235236237238239240241242243 ... LastLast
Results 3,496 to 3,510 of 3731

Thread: Destroyers - Fletcher Class

  1. #3496
    Global Moderator
    Military Professional
    Defense Professional
    Albany Rifles's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Apr 07
    Location
    Prince George, VA
    Posts
    8,802
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinytop View Post
    Boy am I glad I was in the Army!
    Ever been in a Bradley Fighting Vehicle in MOPP 4 in the Mojave in August?

    ;-)
    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

  2. #3497
    Regular
    Join Date
    11 May 14
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by FlankDestroyer View Post
    I was on a Sumner Class that did the conversion in 1969 during a yard availability. We did this fuel swap in concert with adding probe refueling (instead of pigtail in a trunk). Maybe that is a quick way to discern if the Fletchers had the conversion? I suspect there were very few if any 445s that got the fuel change as I outlined earlier. The money went to the Sumner/Gearing Class conversions as they had a longer shelf life.

    Basically do you want to spend the money if you are going to decommission in the near term? Probably not!

    Beyond the soot, one of the prime advantages of the fuel was Boiler Technician (BT) retention as the workload and nature of the work changed somewhat with the reduced maintenance requirements. As a side note we lost some range with the fuel conversion and obviously more refining is more expensive.
    Thank you FlankDestroyer! I forgot all about the probe change out, which would need to be accomplished by a repair facility due to the piping mods. And of course the BT Retention! More time on liberty less time doing watersides and fireside! Didn’t BUPERS do away with or substantially reduce the BT reinlistment bonus as well during that time?

  3. #3498
    Regular
    Join Date
    11 May 14
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    and some more pictures...
    The good, the pretty & the robbed...
    Great photos! Lots of memories!

  4. #3499
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    2,669

    Pictures.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Boilermaker9 View Post
    Great photos! Lots of memories!
    Lots of pictures....
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  5. #3500
    Global Moderator
    Military Professional
    Defense Professional
    Albany Rifles's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Apr 07
    Location
    Prince George, VA
    Posts
    8,802
    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    Lots of pictures....
    Seeing all of that insulation....my Dad died of Myelodysplastic Anemia back in 2000 at age 72. He had been a snipe on the USS Cabot 44-46. I can't but help wonder if exposure to asbestos in the fire room could have been the cause. When the ship was hit a kamikaze on 25 NOV 44 the whole hull rang. Dad said the engine spaces were filled with dust which seemed to come off all the insulation.

    One wonders....

    Again, a tip of the hat to the Bluejackets who manned these ships.

    BTW, I started a book called Tin Can Titans: The Heroic Men and Ships of World War II's Most Decorated Navy Destroyer Squadron by John Wukovits. It's the story of DESRON 21. I'll let you know how it goes.
    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

  6. #3501
    Regular
    Join Date
    11 May 14
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    Lots of pictures....
    . I believe one of the several reasons it is difficult to open fire rooms and engine rooms in the museum ships is the asbestos removal or encapsulation is very expensive. The Navy went through a program to remove the asbestos however it became cost prohibitive and decided to encapsulate those ships remaining that had asbestos lagging. As piping and valves were repaired that asbestos lagging, and valve pads were replaced non asbestos material and the disturbed asbestos that remained was encapsulated. When I was a boilermaker we used an insulating material "monkey s..t" to fill in the gaps between the insulating block and the steel inner casing. That material was dry. We mixed it with water by hand and just slapped in in the crevices. At 71 I guess I am one of the lucky ones...at least so far.
    On another note the center photo is very interesting as is shows the I believe, main steam valve with the scissors type mechanical advantage arrangement used to open the valve. Even with that these were very difficult to operate and back in the day most of the crew had their own "Crows Foot". to assist in the opening closing and tightening. Sometimes if one did not maintain the scissors they would bind and it would take 2 guys to operate the things. The remote operating cable looks like it is attached to the turbo steam, not sure. another note the crew would sometimes disconnect the remote operating cable to make the valves easier to operate. The navy at the time shied away from automation and the use of hydraulics or electrics to assist in opening and closing these valves. All done by hand except for the large capital ships where they had no choice the volume of steam was to great and necessitating valves too large to operate without some assistance.

  7. #3502
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    2,669

    ...and pictures...

    A few more pictures from the after engine room of a Fletcher class DD.
    The forward engine room has been used for parts.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  8. #3503
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    2,669

    ... parts room ...

    ...an example of the forward fire room, (unrestored).
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  9. #3504
    Regular
    Join Date
    11 May 14
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by blidgepump View Post
    ...an example of the forward fire room, (unrestored).
    is it possible that these images may be the engine room as opposed to the fire room? I believe both fire rooms have wing tanks between the boilers and hull on top of which the forced draft blower rooms sit. If I were to guess I would say this is one of the engine rooms. judging from the size of the gate vale and attached piping in the first image I would guess is the main condenser overboard and the lower image appears to have the head of an aux condenser discharge to the seacheast. That said these images give new meaning to the term " cannibalization". During my tenor at NISMD Philadelphia I assisted and my self cannablized many a engine room and fire room, however in those days one had to keep the place clean unless it was a strike ship then we just had to keep it safe. I will say the removed diamond plate is a safety hazard! Just sayn! Quick story though not of Philadelphia but of Boston. I was stationed in Fleet Maintenance Assistance Group in Newport RI. We were tasked to remove drum internals from a Dealey Class DE that was being prepared for scrap at the BNSY south Annex. Not a bad gig right? Wrong it was middle January and the ship was to say the least..cold.... Crawling into the steam drum required one to shed the warm jackets and work furiously to maintain warmth. Chipping ice off lines and hammering off frozen nuts (Rust Frozen). No torches allowed --fire hazard. I will say that was the second coldest experience of my 20 years in the Navy. By the time I removed all the internals I was COLD from head to foot and could barely move my fingers! An experience I shall never forget!!! Needless to say I did not carry the peaces out of the fire room my compares did! Note: we did not spend time cleaning up!!! Quickly headed for the nearest watering hole for some liquid heat!

  10. #3505
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    2,669

    Pictures...

    Boilermaker 9,

    Yes in deed, the photos just could be as you say.
    The collection of jpegs from the three Fletcher-DD have yet to be successfully cataloged, ( my fault and laziness ).
    I am enjoying your recitals as the depth of field has suffered with the loss of "Rusty and our resident "O-6".
    With your USN background in the recycling of parts, I'm glad your around to explain things.
    Last edited by blidgepump; 09 May 18, at 16:10. Reason: typo's ....

  11. #3506
    Contributor bbvet's Avatar
    Join Date
    19 Apr 14
    Location
    near Wallburg, NC
    Posts
    332
    BM9,

    I also am enjoying the engineering lessons on the FLETCHERs. As BP points out, a couple of our resident experts have gone to Davy Jones Locker and aren't around to provide answers when needed. I also thank BP for his nice collection of pictures.

    WELL DONE to both of you!

  12. #3507
    Regular Cruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    16 Feb 16
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama. In the Southeastern United St
    Posts
    69
    I want to thank you for joining in also, Boilermaker9. As Blidgepump and Bbvet stated, we've been sorely missing two highly esteemed members here.

    Seeing as how my own experience is limited to just four years, all on one ship, thirty-three years ago, I very much enjoy learning about how things are/were on other ships. Especially in engineering sections on steam driven ships. Although I also read all I can on the newer stuff.

    A belated "Welcome" to you, Boilermaker9. I'm glad you're here!

  13. #3508
    Global Moderator
    Military Professional
    Defense Professional
    Albany Rifles's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Apr 07
    Location
    Prince George, VA
    Posts
    8,802
    Ditto what these guys have said. I have learned a ton on this thread.

    BTW, I just finished Tin Can Titans: The Heroic Men and Ships of World War II's Most Decorated Navy Destroyer Squadron
    Book by John Wukovits
    , the story of DESRON 21 which included the Fletcher & O'Bannon. Has anyone else read that book? If so I'd like your thoughts on it.

    Thanks gang.
    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

  14. #3509
    Regular
    Join Date
    11 May 14
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    138
    Thank you guys for the acceptance and the kind words. I too love those ships. I always thought of them as well proportioned, sleek, fast and pleasing to the eye. Un like many of the ships of the period. The fletchers were very fast with 60k shaft horse power (SHP). 30-35 its out of the box! Not much could beat them! The Sumner 692 and the Gearing 710 classes of DD used the same propulsion plant as the Fletchers and I have to say it but they were just as fast. It is a shame they did not have the technology to automate the boilers but even so this ships lasted 40-50 years some of them with the same propulsion plants, which in my mind is a testament to the people who designed and built them and the people who steamed them! Robert Sumrall" Sumner-Gearing Class Destroyers" is an excellent read. A bit pricy though 44 bucks on amazon. Another is Us Destroyers by Norman Friedman. Also a bit pricy on Amazon. Both excellent books. I read them a long time ago.

  15. #3510
    Regular
    Join Date
    07 Jan 18
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by Boilermaker9 View Post
    Thank you guys for the acceptance and the kind words. I too love those ships. I always thought of them as well proportioned, sleek, fast and pleasing to the eye. Un like many of the ships of the period. The fletchers were very fast with 60k shaft horse power (SHP). 30-35 its out of the box! Not much could beat them! The Sumner 692 and the Gearing 710 classes of DD used the same propulsion plant as the Fletchers and I have to say it but they were just as fast. It is a shame they did not have the technology to automate the boilers but even so this ships lasted 40-50 years some of them with the same propulsion plants, which in my mind is a testament to the people who designed and built them and the people who steamed them! Robert Sumrall" Sumner-Gearing Class Destroyers" is an excellent read. A bit pricy though 44 bucks on amazon. Another is Us Destroyers by Norman Friedman. Also a bit pricy on Amazon. Both excellent books. I read them a long time ago.
    Here here!

    Indeed the 445s were fine looking ships and my favorite "looker". The Charles Adams DDG class would be next? The 692/710s did have basically the same propulsion performance. Although post treaty Destroyers, the Fletchers and the following Sumners, were not really clean slate designs in the sense that production constraints were just as important as war fighting. However the United States did an admirable job of balancing production with best of breed war capabilities and the Fletchers are testimony to that. And we built some 175 of them! Frankly as best as I can remember only one mass production USA war machine, the Sherman Tank, was not near the top of the rung on the war fighting ladder.

    The 692s did pickup some modest but significant upgrades on the engineering front to include more electrical power and an additional emergency diesel generator. Importantly they crammed in an another evaporator as well. Water on a steam ship is important I hear! The twin mount ships could also turn better with twin rudders although after the War the Fletchers were configured with a larger rudder. The 710 did have some much need gas...handy for the Pacific.

    While automatic boiler/combustion controls (ABC/ACC) did not make it to the destroyer M types these destroyer could be managed by hand/eye. We found out later the "superior" 1200 psi plants all but made these ABC systems mandatory as humans for all intents and purposes could not keep up with the boiler ... so hand checking was over! On other ships, to a smaller degree some boiler/feed water control was added to the venerable M type years later. Many wonder if the 1200 follow on plants were really an advantage all things considered. Boiler Techs (BTs) paid the price for the new technology almost like the NSFO cleaning days.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by FlankDestroyer; 13 May 18, at 00:50.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Modernized Iowa Class versus Essex WWII Carrier Class
    By talshiar in forum Battleships Board
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 30 Apr 18,, 11:24
  2. WWII Destroyers
    By Master Chief in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 23 Feb 13,, 00:29
  3. Iowa Class vs Kirov Class
    By eocoolj in forum Battleships Board
    Replies: 224
    Last Post: 12 Jun 08,, 00:02
  4. What Should the Next Gen Destroyers....
    By Tibbetts in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 13 Jan 06,, 18:23
  5. Kidd Class vs Sovremmeney Class
    By BUFF in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 98
    Last Post: 03 Jan 05,, 04:42

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •