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Thread: Destroyers - Fletcher Class

  1. #3346
    Military Professional JCT's Avatar
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    It's not uncommon today to do the same, cut holes in the deck or side of the hull to remove or embark large items. Computer racks are usually cabled and filled on shore, getting them through the tight passageways, and particularly the ladder wells is very difficult if not impossible. Server rooms are usually located below decks for protection.

  2. #3347
    Senior Contributor Builder 2010's Avatar
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    Well, that certainly answers that question. To a layman, opening up the ship to get something out would freak you out, but to the experienced shipyard workers it would just be another day at the office.

  3. #3348
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    New Fletcher Model

    While at my local hobby shop yesterday (Scale Reproductions Inc., Louisville, KY) I was introduced to a new Revell Germany model; a 1:144 large scale Fletcher Class DD Platinum edition that came included with a comprehensive set of PE and machined brass parts with total count at 1,300 pieces, all for about $150.00. I now know the next plastic model I'm going to build. Stay tuned.

    The scale allows for beautiful detailing of the smaller guns, the Depth Charge racks and guns, and all the radar and direction finders. At that scale an Iowa ship would be over 6 feet long. I do not have the room to display that, but I had a nice spot for a 31" Fletcher.

    Here's some pictures:

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    Name:  Fletcher Plastic.jpg
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    I don't know about you, but if you've got the room for a 31" model and have the inclination to get up to your elbows in some serious detail work, this would make one heck of a Fletcher model for Fletcher lovers.

  4. #3349
    Contributor bbvet's Avatar
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    B2010,

    Well, I see that Revell did come thru - that model IS back into production. I am in the early stages of developing 2D CAD drawings for my 3D parts designer (Model Monkey @ Shapeways) to design modified deckhouses for that kit to be converted to a 4-gun FLETCHER (1950s-1960s). I got one of the original kits earlier this year from a fellow modeler in AZ who wasn't going to build it and am now putting together a small cache' of 3D printed parts for use in converting this kit to a later 1960s USS STODDARD (DD-566). We are also working with a researcher/author on getting the correct documentation (photos/plans) in order for these parts to be accurate.
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    The Revell model is of one of the many round-bridge FLETCHERs - mine will be a square-bridge (Seattle built) version. So, this will be another long-term modeling project for me. The photo was taken before the model arrived at it's new home port!

  5. #3350
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
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    another Fletcher keel is laid ????

    Quote Originally Posted by bbvet View Post
    B2010,

    Well, I see that Revell did come thru - that model IS back into production. I am in the early stages of developing 2D CAD drawings for my 3D parts designer (Model Monkey @ Shapeways) to design modified deckhouses for that kit to be converted to a 4-gun FLETCHER (1950s-1960s). I got one of the original kits earlier this year from a fellow modeler in AZ who wasn't going to build it and am now putting together a small cache' of 3D printed parts for use in converting this kit to a later 1960s USS STODDARD (DD-566). We are also working with a researcher/author on getting the correct documentation (photos/plans) in order for these parts to be accurate.
    Name:  DSC03116.jpg
Views: 271
Size:  421.4 KB

    The Revell model is of one of the many round-bridge FLETCHERs - mine will be a square-bridge (Seattle built) version. So, this will be another long-term modeling project for me. The photo was taken before the model arrived at it's new home port!
    bbvet, this will make an interesting addition to the Fletcher thread as we follow your construction skillset in the many months to come.... please keep us snap together modelers posted....

  6. #3351
    Military Professional JCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Builder 2010 View Post
    Well, that certainly answers that question. To a layman, opening up the ship to get something out would freak you out, but to the experienced shipyard workers it would just be another day at the office.
    Just found a couple photos of an LCS engine being removed.

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    Name:  1000w_q95-350x233 removing LCS engine.jpg
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  7. #3352
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    I suppose it is very infrequent to actually remove and entire prime mover from the vessel. If it was routine, they'd probably make the access points removable. Pretty impressive!

  8. #3353
    Military Professional JCT's Avatar
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    It's possible this photo is from LCS-1, a discussion of the engineering failure is in the LCS thread. I probably should have put the photos there instead of here in the Fletcher thread.

  9. #3354
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
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    CUt a hole....

    Quote Originally Posted by JCT View Post
    It's possible this photo is from LCS-1, a discussion of the engineering failure is in the LCS thread. I probably should have put the photos there instead of here in the Fletcher thread.
    Glad you did post here, it's a good illustration to the earlier question addressing the method to move, exchange, replace, repair, or drag out of the way a piece of machinery,,,,

  10. #3355
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
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    Full of turkey .....

    https://www.history.navy.mil/researc...reas-wwii.html

    This website addresses the Structural Repairs in Forward Areas during WWII.
    Three (3)Fletcher Class DD's [ Foote, Newcomb & Wadleigh] are listed and several interesting illustrations addressing the damage and repairs.
    Some interesting reading should one find themselves stuffed with turkey on a quiet Thursday afternoon.

  11. #3356
    Senior Contributor Builder 2010's Avatar
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    I can't believe I just read that entire document. First of all the guts and creativity applied to bring those vessels back in service is astounding. Second, it's frankly unbelievable that those vessels didn't sink and there were enough hardy souls alive in them after the mayhem to be able to take the necessary actions to prevent further destruction and save the ships long enough so further help can be had. And all of this occurred in wartime. It's hard to conceive of the damage those weapons could do to structural steel.

    Thanks for sharing.

  12. #3357
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
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    Tin Can sailors....

    Quote Originally Posted by Builder 2010 View Post
    I can't believe I just read that entire document. First of all the guts and creativity applied to bring those vessels back in service is astounding. Second, it's frankly unbelievable that those vessels didn't sink and there were enough hardy souls alive in them after the mayhem to be able to take the necessary actions to prevent further destruction and save the ships long enough so further help can be had. And all of this occurred in wartime. It's hard to conceive of the damage those weapons could do to structural steel.

    Thanks for sharing.
    A short recap http://www.destroyers.org/LD-Images/...rs-Damaged.htm
    of six (6) DD's and their WWII battle damage.... ( yes the turkey left overs are all gone!)

  13. #3358
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    Interesting... it also showed the horrible death toll that those attacks caused. The damage treatise didn't mention the casualties at all, just the mechanicals as if there were no people on board when these things happened. Suicide attacks were very effective. Depressingly so.

  14. #3359
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    Quote Originally Posted by Builder 2010 View Post
    Interesting... it also showed the horrible death toll that those attacks caused. The damage treatise didn't mention the casualties at all, just the mechanicals as if there were no people on board when these things happened. Suicide attacks were very effective. Depressingly so.
    In Jim Hornfischer's spectacular Neptune's Inferno I found out an interesting fact I had never known: The USN lost 3 times as many sailors at Guadalcanal than the Marines lost...approx. 5,000 to 1,600 KIA.

    At Okinawa the USN again suffered more KIA than either the Marines or Army.

    Iron Ships and Iron Men
    “Loyalty to country ALWAYS. Loyalty to government, when it deserves it.”
    Mark Twain

  15. #3360
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albany Rifles View Post
    In Jim Hornfischer's spectacular Neptune's Inferno I found out an interesting fact I had never known: The USN lost 3 times as many sailors at Guadalcanal than the Marines lost...approx. 5,000 to 1,600 KIA.

    At Okinawa the USN again suffered more KIA than either the Marines or Army.

    Iron Ships and Iron Men
    Reading some of the damage summaries above, when a ship went down or was hit hard, often a large percentage of the crew were killed or wounded. If your ship explodes when the magazines are hit, not a lot of time to get out and don a life jacket.

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