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Thread: What has happened to al Sadr?

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    What has happened to al Sadr?

    There was a time when al Sadr was quite a big boy in Iraq. But now I haven't heard a word from him in ages? What has happened?
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    Waiting for the Americans to pull out.
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    He was ran out of Iraq and absconded in Iran. He found it difficult to run an insurgency from the outside and his influence had since diminished.
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    I'll tell you what happened to al-Sadr, his party just preformed extraordinarily well in the elections and as a single party they are second largest in parliament now (al-Iraqiyya is a list of many different parties, none has over 40 seats, like Sadr movement) and he's about to return, this time with the title Ayatollah.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kermanshahi View Post
    I'll tell you what happened to al-Sadr, his party just preformed extraordinarily well in the elections and as a single party they are second largest in parliament now (al-Iraqiyya is a list of many different parties, none has over 40 seats, like Sadr movement) and he's about to return, this time with the title Ayatollah.
    Figures are just in, Maliki's Da'awa Party won 36 (of which only 22 for his own faction), Allawis National Accord won 27, al-Hakim's Supreme Council won 17 and the two Kurdish parties: KDP (led by Kurdish President Barzani) and PUK (led by Iraqi President Talabani) won 26 and 16 seats respectively, so with 40 seats Muqtada al-Sadr has the largest party in Iraqi parliament and people were talking about his influence decreasing...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kermanshahi View Post
    Figures are just in, Maliki's Da'awa Party won 36 (of which only 22 for his own faction), Allawis National Accord won 27, al-Hakim's Supreme Council won 17 and the two Kurdish parties: KDP (led by Kurdish President Barzani) and PUK (led by Iraqi President Talabani) won 26 and 16 seats respectively, so with 40 seats Muqtada al-Sadr has the largest party in Iraqi parliament and people were talking about his influence decreasing...
    What? You do realize that there were 444 seats contested right? Meaning he has less than 10% of the seats and according to this he had only 6% of the vote...

    Iraqi governorate elections, 2009 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And what about the State of Law coalition? From what I can tell, the big ones don't like the Sadrists, politically isolated anyone?
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    Quote Originally Posted by wkllaw View Post
    What? You do realize that there were 444 seats contested right? Meaning he has less than 10% of the seats and according to this he had only 6% of the vote...

    Iraqi governorate elections, 2009 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And what about the State of Law coalition? From what I can tell, the big ones don't like the Sadrists, politically isolated anyone?
    That was last year and the Sadr Movement didn't even run, there were several pro-Sadrists lists which ran, the biggest: "The Independent free movement" got 6% of the vote, which was better than last time (2005) when Sadrists only won seats in a few provincial assemblies, this time they won seats in all Shi'a provinces.

    I'm talking about the parliamentary elections of March, this year. The coalition were Sadr was part of came out third (due to bad preformance of his coalition partners), as a single party the Sadr Movement is largest in the entire parliament with 40 seats (in total there are 325), the State of Law Coalition came in 2nd with 89 seats but it's a coalition of 10+ parties, it's main party Dawa, led by PM Maliki got just 22 seats, other factions of Dawa got 14, in total 36. Iraqiyya got 91 seats only 27 of which for Allawi's party.

    Sadr might have not built the best coalition, but his movement is the biggest among Shi'as and infact in all of Iraq, all potential Prime Ministers realise they cannot form a government without him, they're all offering him concessions, public support has put him in a position of power again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kermanshahi View Post
    I'll tell you what happened to al-Sadr, his party just preformed extraordinarily well in the elections and as a single party they are second largest in parliament now (al-Iraqiyya is a list of many different parties, none has over 40 seats, like Sadr movement) and he's about to return, this time with the title Ayatollah.
    *Doubt you will ever see that happen, especially the new "title", even Saddam used the title President. The people wont go for it and there is no way he can pull off what Iran did to her own people by cheating them. Iraq's elections and the time it took to count the votes completely reinforced that Irans people got screwed by the assahola and the votes nor their choice mattered since he handed the victory to dinnerjacket long before any of those votes could have been totaled. Iraq is much different then Iran, atleast they know their votes counted and there is no way they will accept the title assahola for their leader, they are far too advanced for that.

    IMO, Al-Sadr wont be elected leader, he is far too extreme and has too much Iranian ties where he hides and gives hate speeches about the West after his Army had their asses handed to them. A dam shame considering the West has helped turn Iraq around and the people see a new beginning. Al-Sadr can offer them no such things under his rule beside extremeist views and hate talk. Compare that to what they have now and what they will have and guess who wins the election. Hint, its not Sadir and the people more then likely view his so called army as nothing but a simular Basij under Irans extremeist rulers. When Iraq finally takes shape I'm betting she will outpace Iran in many ways.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 10 Apr 10, at 23:50.
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    Dreadnought Reply

    "Iraq is much different then Iran, atleast they know their votes counted..."

    Kermanshahi just finished calling Iraq a dictatorship in another thread while referencing in this thread Ayad Allawi, Moqtada al-Sadr, and Nouri al-Maliki, all shia, in Iraqi electoral results...and in the same paragraph.

    Just another forked-tongued Persian with an axe to grind.
    Last edited by S2; 11 Apr 10, at 10:18.
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    Quote Originally Posted by S-2 View Post
    "Iraq is much different then Iran, atleast they know their votes counted..."

    Kermanshahi just finished calling Iraq a dictatorship in another thread while referencing in this thead Ayad Allawi, Moqtada al-Sadr, and Nouri al-Maliki, all shia, in Iraqi electoral results...and in the same paragraph.

    Just another forked-tongued Persian with an axe to grind.
    *Imagine that.)
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    Dreadnought, from your post it's evident you don't even know what Ayatollah means. It's a religious title, not a political one, Sadr has gone to Qom to study to become Ayatollah (currently he is Hojatol Islam) this will give him much more status than he has now.

    Also, the elections have already and the political party led by Muqtada al-Sadr (who didn't run himself and doesn't want to be President or Prime Minister) won the most seats in parliament, this proves he is the most popular figure and al-Maliki is possibly going to accept making Jaafar al-Sadr (Muqtada's cousin) the new Prime Minister.

    S-2, I'm not Persian, I'm Kurdish. And there have been allegations of vote rigging in Iraq aswell, Maliki and the Kurds claim that Allawi and the Saudis rigged the vote, while Allawi and several Shi'a religious parties claim Maliki and the Americans rigged the vote.

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    Kermanshahi Reply

    "S-2, I'm not Persian, I'm Kurdish."

    Forgive me.

    "there have been allegations of vote rigging in Iraq aswell, Maliki and the Kurds claim that Allawi and the Saudis rigged the vote, while Allawi and several Shi'a religious parties claim Maliki and the Americans rigged the vote."

    Meaning that, of course, there was really no significant results achieved for everybody's machinations. Instead the multiplicity of parties and inability to achieve an outright victory for any one grouping suggests they'll have to hammer out coalition alliances where power will be shared.

    None of which remotely reflects a dictatorship as you suggested. Not that electoral results would be the only indication of such as compared to, say, Saddam Hussein. The mere participation of these once disfavored personages and their constituencies, nevermind Barzani and Talibani, would be a far cry from the last form of government in Iraq.

    We can be assured that Saddam never experienced these problems.
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    Quote Originally Posted by S-2 View Post
    "S-2, I'm not Persian, I'm Kurdish."

    Forgive me.

    "there have been allegations of vote rigging in Iraq aswell, Maliki and the Kurds claim that Allawi and the Saudis rigged the vote, while Allawi and several Shi'a religious parties claim Maliki and the Americans rigged the vote."

    Meaning that, of course, there was really no significant results achieved for everybody's machinations. Instead the multiplicity of parties and inability to achieve an outright victory for any one grouping suggests they'll have to hammer out coalition alliances where power will be shared.

    None of which remotely reflects a dictatorship as you suggested. Not that electoral results would be the only indication of such as compared to, say, Saddam Hussein. The mere participation of these once disfavored personages and their constituencies, nevermind Barzani and Talibani, would be a far cry from the last form of government in Iraq.

    We can be assured that Saddam never experienced these problems.
    Can you quote me saying there was a dictatorship?

    Anyway, the results mean, Maliki needs Sadr, he's already offered to release all Sadr's captured fighters (though this was officially called an offer for the police to jointly with the Sadrists investigate which prisoners are "innocent"), now there is even talk of making Muqtada al-Sadr's cousing Jaffar al-Sadr, a compromise Prime Minister.

    But aside inside this multi-party system, the fact remains that Sadr's party is the biggest, he managed to get more votes than any other prominent figure in Iraq which suggests enough about his popularity.

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    [/B]TE=Kermanshahi;729663]Dreadnought, from your post it's evident you don't even know what Ayatollah means. It's a religious title, not a political one, Sadr has gone to Qom to study to become Ayatollah (currently he is Hojatol Islam) this will give him much more status than he has now.

    *Maybe to his followers but to the rest it wont change what he already is.


    Also, the elections have already and the political party led by Muqtada al-Sadr (who didn't run himself and doesn't want to be President or Prime Minister) won the most seats in parliament, this proves he is the most popular figure and al-Maliki is possibly going to accept making Jaafar al-Sadr (Muqtada's cousin) the new Prime Minister.

    *I am very familiar with the title, yes it is a religious title and no there is no place for it among Iraq's government. The very best thing they can do is learn to seperate church/Mosque and state, that way there will not be a dictatorship such as Irans lunitic theocracy,

    *If he is in fact the most popular (which I truelly doubt) then why spirit off to Iran and preach hate against the west. Why not stay?

    *Many religious titles are a sham when you see these men preach hatred and war. As a religious figure if anything he should be preaching tolerence and peace and we both know that clown does neither of the two. His army was routed and therefore he fled to Iran.

    S-2, I'm not Persian, I'm Kurdish. And there have been allegations of vote rigging in Iraq aswell, Maliki and the Kurds claim that Allawi and the Saudis rigged the vote, while Allawi and several Shi'a religious parties claim Maliki and the Americans rigged the vote.[/QUOTE]

    *Would love to here your theory on how the "Americans" rigged the vote. Soldiers have no vote in that country only in ours. And there is no American populace in Iraq outside of soldiers and contractors.

    *Unlike Iran, they are subject to recount. Irans leaders never gave the people the chance. I would bet anything that if in fact there ever was a fair and open election in Iran, dinnerjacket would have been gone long ago.
    And we all know that as fact.

    They got screwed. And anybody with better then a second grade education can see that on its very value.
    Last edited by Dreadnought; 12 Apr 10, at 05:25.
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    Kermanshahi Reply

    "Can you quote me saying there was a dictatorship?"

    Yes-

    "Iraq War and Afghanistan War, two wars to "instal democracy" both merely replaced one dictatorhips with another..."

    Karzai's Monkey Business Post #60

    "...he managed to get more votes than any other prominent figure in Iraq which suggests enough about his popularity."

    By my count he personally controls about 12% of the parliament. By your count he does so as the third most powerful coalition.
    "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
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