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Thread: South Korea naval forces

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    South Korea naval forces

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    December 23, 2008

    High-Tech Vessel On Patrol For Seoul

    South Korea deployed its first Aegis-equipped destroyer Monday as part of a program to boost its naval forces. The 7,600-ton-class ship’s Lockheed Martin-made Aegis radar and combat system will enable it to detect and trace 1,000 targets and strike 20 of them simultaneously, the navy said. South Korea shares the world’s most heavily fortified border and a disputed maritime frontier with North Korea .

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    ....

    a very capable navy..

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    http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=3892480&c=EUR
    South Korea Orders Six More Type 214 Submarines

    By THOMAS NEWDICK
    Published: 8 Jan 16:11 EST (21:11 GMT)


    BERLIN - Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft (HDW) has been contracted to provide South Korea with six additional Type 214 submarines. Announced Jan. 7, the deal has been struck between the South Korean procurement authority and a consortium comprising HDW - part of Hamburg-based ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems AG - and MarineForce International.

    The batch of six conventional submarines will be supplied as packages for assembly by local shipyards. The first of the batch is to be built by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering. Tenders for the production of the second vessel will be submitted in summer 2009.

    South Korea ordered a previous batch of three Type 214s in 2000. The first of these was delivered in 2007, and in December 2008 the second was handed over to the South Korean Navy, which designated the boats as the Son Won-il class.

    The third submarine is being completed by Hyundai Heavy Industries in Ulsan , which is responsible for construction of the first batch.

    Key features of the 1,800-ton Type 214 include an air-independent propulsion system based on hydrogen fuel cells, and a modular construction principle that can be adapted to customer requirements. According to HDW, these six submarines will be "almost identical" to the first batch.

    The Type 214 is a further development of the Type 212A used by the German Navy.

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    Administrator Tarek Morgen's Avatar
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    The Type 214 is a further development of the Type 212A used by the German Navy.
    not really true, the 214 is somewhere between the 209 and the 212 and lacks several of the features of the 212 which are not "for sale". So its rather a "downgrade" and not an upgrade from the 212.

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    still a capable design.

    i wish the u.s would buy a small fleet of 212-214"s and train on them.also the new kdx sejong the great and recent japanese atago"s and u.s ddg51"s are all awesome ships,i still prefer aegis over paams on the t45,with aegis being upgraded constantly its still supreme ,i think 105 or 108 ships total with aegis from 4 or 5 nations.heck even the chinese destroyer with the phased array panels a'la aegis looking is a good looking ship,clean lines not cluttered up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by biteasaur View Post
    i wish the u.s would buy a small fleet of 212-214"s and train on them.
    While not the same thing, the USN does train against foreign navy D/E boats, such as the Colombian Navy.
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    Resident Curmudgeon Military Professional Gun Grape's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TopHatter View Post
    While not the same thing, the USN does train against foreign navy D/E boats, such as the Colombian Navy.
    We also leased the Gotland and her crew for 2 years from Sweden.

    She was stationed in San Diego

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    I wonder how Japan feels about all of this. They're the only one who I can think of as the buildup being targeted against.

    The Norks? Don't be ridiculous. The PLA? They have much bigger fishes to worry about and the KDX is overkill for whatever the PLA has in the water up around the Yellow Sea. The Russians I could sort of see, but the fleet out of Vladivastok isn't terribly impressive.

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    hard to tell for sure but..

    i think the japanese navy is still 2 or 3 times as capable,maybe more, as south koreas at least, being a counterweight to china and all.

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    South Korea and Japan are theoretically allies. The same way as Greece and Turkey are members of Nato. Yes there are some saber rattling, but going hot is not in the books.

    JMSDF is considerable far more capable than the Korean Navy. The Korean Navy is still on its infancy regarding blue water ops. The JMSDF had been doing it for the past 100 years, with obvious interruptions after WWII. They had operated Aegis for longer and have more of them (5 vs 1). Their submarines are arguable the best SSK's in the world.

    The Korean build up is not focused on any nation. It is a build up of a country that has become fully developed. It wants a blue water navy for the same reason Japan has: they benefit from maritime trade and thus are vulnerable any maritime threats.

    On another note:

    Do you guys notice that allied Asian nations (Japan and Korea) are having an "all or nothing" approach towards their naval ships. The European and RAN are in cost cutting measures and downgraded capabilities on their ships (Hobart instead of Burke, T-45 not fully equip, etc)

    Do Japan and South Korea just have more money?

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    Military Professional maximusslade's Avatar
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    I dont think it is an issue of them having more money. I may be off in this but it may just buy they arent buying as many, and therefore can afford to put more money into them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by maximusslade View Post
    I dont think it is an issue of them having more money. I may be off in this but it may just buy they arent buying as many, and therefore can afford to put more money into them.
    That may answer for the Type 45 destroyers but for the rest.

    KDX III - 3 ships
    Atago - 2 Ships
    Hobart class - 3 ships (RAN)
    Horizon class- 4 ships (2 each Italy and France)
    F-124 - 3 ships (Germany)

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    Official Thread Jacker Senior Contributor gunnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IDonT View Post
    That may answer for the Type 45 destroyers but for the rest.

    KDX III - 3 ships
    Atago - 2 Ships
    Hobart class - 3 ships (RAN)
    Horizon class- 4 ships (2 each Italy and France)
    F-124 - 3 ships (Germany)
    Atago is a variation of the Kongo class, which Japan has 4 of, in addition to the Atago class.

    Spain has 5 Álvaro de Bazán class.

    Norway has 5 Fridtjof Nansen class.

    Both Hobart and Fridtjof Nansen classes are based on the Álvaro de Bazán.

    Fridtjof Nansen is not fully fitted out, just like the Type 45 of RN. Fridtjof Nansen only has a single 8-cell Mk. 41 launcher. At 5300t, she is also the smallest Aegis ship in existance.

    Just noticed something: Hobart the Air Warfare "Destroyer" is based on Álvaro de Bazán the "frigate."
    Last edited by gunnut; 13 Jan 09, at 01:57.
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnut View Post
    Atago is a variation of the Kongo class, which Japan has 4 of, in addition to the Atago class.

    Spain has 5 Álvaro de Bazán class.

    Norway has 5 Fridtjof Nansen class.

    Both Hobart and Fridtjof Nansen classes are based on the Álvaro de Bazán.

    Fridtjof Nansen is not fully fitted out, just like the Type 45 of RN. Fridtjof Nansen only has a single 8-cell Mk. 41 launcher. At 5300t, she is also the smallest Aegis ship in existance.

    Just noticed something: Hobart the Air Warfare "Destroyer" is based on Álvaro de Bazán the "frigate."
    Yes, Atago is a Flight IIA Burke derivative. How it and the Kongo were purchase 10 years apart, implying that they on different political and economic crisis.

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    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/...edium=textlink



    FFX: Korea ’s New Frigates

    08-Jan-2009 14:26 EST



    Related Stories: Asia - Other, Contracts - Awards, Force Structure, Issues - Political, Other Corporation, Surface Ships - Combat, Thales



    Late Ulsan Class

    (click to view full)



    South Korea currently owns some of the world’s best and most advanced shipyards. The civilian strength is beginning to create military leverage, and recent years have seen the ROK take several steps toward fielding a true open-ocean, blue water navy. Their new KDX-II destroyers, KDX-III AEGIS destroyers, LPX amphibious assault ships, and KSS-I/KSS-II (U209/U214) submarines will give the nation growing clout on the international stage, but what about the home front? North Korea ’s submarines continue to insert commandos in South Korean territory, its gunboats have launched surprise attacks on the ROK Navy twice in the last decade, and fishing rights have become a contentious issue with China and led to the murder of a Coast Guard official.



    Hence the FFX program, which aims to build upon lessons learned from shipbuilding programs during the 1980s and 1990s, and field a modern class of up 24-27 light patrol frigates that will replace 37 existing ships.



    A contract to build the lead FFX frigate was issued in December 2008…



    The FFX Class, and its Predecessors





    Pohang Class ASW

    (click to view full)



    The ROKN’s 9 small 2,200 – 2,300 ton Ulsan Class frigates were built in South Korea, and commissioned from 1981-1993. They are not designed to operate alone in high-threat areas, or to provide general fleet defense on the open seas. Instead, they are designed to serve as high-end coastal patrol vessels with a mix of anti-air (RIM-7 Sea Sparrow), anti-ship (guns, RGM-84 Harpoon), and anti-submarine capabilities. They carry a crew of 150.



    Its 24 Pohang Class 1,220 ton patrol corvettes were commissioned from 1984-1993, and have no anti-air missile capabilities. They mount 76mm, 40mm, and 30mm guns like the Ulsan Class, and are divided into 4 anti-surface warfare versions with MBDA’s Exocet ant-ship missiles, but no sonar or torpedoes; and 20 anti-submarine versions with sonar and torpedoes, but no missiles. They carry a crew of 95.



    The ROKN’s 4 low-end Dong Hae Class 1,000 ton patrol corvettes ere commissioned from 1982-1983. they are armed with guns, sonar, and torpedoes, and also carry a crew of 95.



    The new FFX frigates will have a full displacement of 3,200 tons and a crew of 170, and will follow the modern pattern of stealthier ship designs with better radars, sonars, and communications equipment. Firepower will improve with a 127mm gun, RAM Mk 31 short-range anti-aircraft missiles, an embarked Westland Lynx helicopter, and a 30mm Thales Nederland “Goalkeeper’’ system for last-ditch missile defense and small boat overkill. Anti-ship missiles and light torpedoes will also be carried, as is the case with the current Ulsan Class.



    This equipment set will provide a notable firepower upgrade over the current Ulsan Class, and its equipment and versatility will provide a very considerable upgrade indeed over the ROKN’s existing corvettes. The new frigates are expected to begin service in 2011, with the first 6 built and delivered by 2015. The ROK Navy intends to replace the Ulsan , Pohang , and Dong Hae classes by 2020.



    Contracts and Key Events





    ROKN Goalkeeper

    (click to view full)



    Dec 26/08: Hyundai Heavy Industries signs a WON 140 billion (about $106.5 million) contract to build the lead ship of the South Korean Navy’s new FFX frigate class. It is not clear whether this is a complete contract, a contract for the ship minus “government furnished equipment” like weapons, or a partial award.



    Hyundai had been in charge of the basic FFX design. There had been rumors that Korea was considering the RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow missile for medium-range air defense, to be mounted in a vertical launching system that could also host anti-submarine rockets and add new weapons over time. While the ships’ planned 4,550 nautical mile operating range might make that idea attractive, the South Korean Navy appears to have decided to contain costs, and stick to its original mission of coastal defense. Korea Times sources indicate that the new ships will not have vertical launchers. The Korea Times.



    Feb 5/07: Thales Underwater Systems announces a contract from Korea ’s STX Engine CO Ltd, for industrial cooperation aiming at the full scale development of a new Hull Mounted Sonar (HMS) for the FFX frigate program. The sonar will be based on current Thales off-the-shelf products, and final contract completion is expected in 2009.



    Additional Readings



    Global Security – FFK Ulsan class Frigate Korea (FFK)

    Global Security – Pohang (PCC Patrol Combat Corvette)

    Global Security – Tonghae / Dong Hae (PCC Patrol Combat Corvette)
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