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Thread: 11 November

  1. #31
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    ^^^^outstanding!!!

  2. #32
    Defense Professional Dreadnought's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RustyBattleship View Post
    Actually, from my point of view, it turned out all right. We were near the head of the Parade with the Nevada in tow and had to make a real tricky U-turn at 56th street to go North after our Southbound march. But we did it without backing up as the Navy unit ahead of us with a prime mover and a trailer loaded with mines and torpedos. By the time we got back up to Houghton Avenue to turn right for destaging, the Freedom marchers were just passing us on their Southbound leg. There was no screaming, ranting or raving from either them or the on-lookers.

    However, many of the on-lookers were already dispersing to either go home or go to Houghton Park where Military bands (including a Civil War band from Long Beach City College) were to entertain us. There were a number of booths set up for various city agencies and some food concessions. The Lieutenant Governor was there and mixing among the people, especially the reinactors in vintage uniforms.

    Overall, it was a good parade.

    YES! I did put up our flag today on a 15-foot high flagpole I have near the corner of our house.
    Glad to see you guys had a good day out there. You deserved it.
    Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

  3. #33
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    I wish to honour the memory of my Great Great Grandfather who served in the British army in WW1. He won a medal for his courage and on the 11th day of the 11th month I honour his memory. He survived the War but he never forgot his experiences.

  4. #34
    In Memoriam/OAF-Old Aggravating Fart Senior Contributor Shamus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
    Lest We Forget. To my old friend, and loader Steve Tancock R.I.P. (Iraq 2003)
    Quote Originally Posted by great one View Post
    I wish to honour the memory of my Great Great Grandfather who served in the British army in WW1. He won a medal for his courage and on the 11th day of the 11th month I honour his memory. He survived the War but he never forgot his experiences.
    May they both rest easy now.

    I would add my father-United States Army,Korean War....my uncle,Melvin C. Rowley,7th Infantry United States Army,WWII and my grandfather Nelson A. Christenson,United States Army,WWI....may they also rest in peace.
    "Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories." Thomas Jefferson

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamus View Post
    May they both rest easy now.

    I would add my father-United States Army,Korean War....my uncle,Melvin C. Rowley,7th Infantry United States Army,WWII and my grandfather Nelson A. Christenson,United States Army,WWI....may they also rest in peace.
    True heroes.

  6. #36
    Military Professional Shiny Capstar's Avatar
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    For my good friend David Hicks, a great mate.
    Also for Chris Hickey and Anthony Wakefield of my own regiment, who died serving their country.

    Lest we forget.
    Nulli Secundus
    People always talk of dying for their country, and never of making the other bastard die for his

  7. #37
    In Memoriam/OAF-Old Aggravating Fart Senior Contributor Shamus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shiny Capstar View Post
    For my good friend David Hicks, a great mate.
    Also for Chris Hickey and Anthony Wakefield of my own regiment, who died serving their country.

    Lest we forget.
    May they rest in peace Captain.
    "Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories." Thomas Jefferson

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shiny Capstar View Post
    For my good friend David Hicks, a great mate.
    Also for Chris Hickey and Anthony Wakefield of my own regiment, who died serving their country.

    Lest we forget.
    And to Rifleman Yubraj Rai, 2nd Batt Royal Gurkha Rifles, flown back from the Stan yesterday.

  9. #39
    In Memoriam/OAF-Old Aggravating Fart Senior Contributor Shamus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaobam Armour View Post
    And to Rifleman Yubraj Rai, 2nd Batt Royal Gurkha Rifles, flown back from the Stan yesterday.
    Rest in peace
    "Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories." Thomas Jefferson

  10. #40
    In Memoriam/OAF-Old Aggravating Fart Senior Contributor Shamus's Avatar
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    For our Canadian Veterans

    Forward brave soldier, standing tall,
    To foreign lands where duty calls.

    Far from lakes and streams you know,
    To where the desert winds doth blow.

    Red maple leaf held close to heart,
    Honor, duty yours from the start.

    We mourn with tears not yet dry,
    Stare silent at the starlit sky.

    O' Canada you've lost a son,
    Rest easy soldier, your battle done.




    I wrote this after reading of some recent casulties from the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Afghanistan.May they all rest in peace.

  11. #41
    In Memoriam Military Professional dave lukins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiny capstar View Post
    for my good friend david hicks, a great mate.
    Also for chris hickey and anthony wakefield of my own regiment, who died serving their country.

    Lest we forget.
    Quote Originally Posted by chaobam armour View Post
    and to rifleman yubraj rai, 2nd batt royal gurkha rifles, flown back from the stan yesterday.
    Present Arms....RIP

  12. #42
    Pocket Ashley's Mom Military Professional Southie's Avatar
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    On this day I'd like to honor and remember one of our former students, PFC Roberto Baez, who died in the line of duty on 3 October 2005. May he rest in peace!

    http://www.sptimes.com/2005/10/06/Hi...too_soon.shtml
    Last edited by Southie; 11 Nov 08, at 23:49.
    “When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace.” ~ Jimi Hendrix
    "No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7thsfsniper View Post
    Golden corral restaurants wants to honor vets as well on veterans day and will give all vets who come, a free meal. Tomorrow morning I will be attaching my BIG flag to my bike, rolling out in the 30f weather and going to work. Around 4:30pm I'll be heading down to the local Golden Corral in Joplin, to meet a couple friends. We eat last, but in the mean time we hold the door and help any disabled or frail vets throught the crowd and make sure they are taken care of. The line is usually down the walk and around the corner.

    I've met men who stormed the beaches of Normandy, a couple survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor. One who was on the Iowa. Men with metal plates in thier head who lost part of thier skull in the bitter cold of Korea. Men who have served in every conflict and every branch of service.

    The conversations that take place during this gathering are priceless indeed. Thats why I go back every year. No matter how cold it gets.
    Well imagine my surprise when I roll up there this eve and no one around. I call my buddy Jim and he says, "hey dummy, its NEXT MONDAY!"

    But I did put my big flag on the bike and rode proudly. Just a few horn honks and thumbs up there and back. Patriotism isn't dead, but I do think its in a recession(overall) Too bad.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamus View Post
    Forward brave soldier, standing tall,
    To foreign lands where duty calls.

    Far from lakes and streams you know,
    To where the desert winds doth blow.

    Red maple leaf held close to heart,
    Honor, duty yours from the start.

    We mourn with tears not yet dry,
    Stare silent at the starlit sky.

    O' Canada you've lost a son,
    Rest easy soldier, your battle done.




    I wrote this after reading of some recent casulties from the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Afghanistan.May they all rest in peace.
    Shamus that was very moving indeed I am sure those beautiful words will be appreciated by the Canadian WAB members. God bless

  15. #45
    Military Professional Ray's Avatar
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    The Indian Army in World War I

    http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/ARMY/Images-1914a.html

    One and a half million volunteers came forward from the estimated population of 315 million in the Indian subcontinent (present-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka - henceforth referred to, for convenience, as ‘India’). 9th Hodson's Horse near Vraignes, April 1917
    © Imperial War Museum

    Of these 140,000 saw active service on the Western Front in France and Belgium - 90,000 in the front-line Indian Corps, and some 50,000 in auxiliary battalions. Indians were in action on the Western Front within a month of the start of the war, at the First Battle of Ypres where Khudadad Khan became the first Indian to win a Victoria Cross. After a year of front-line duty, sickness and casualties had reduced the Indian Corps to the point where it had to be withdrawn. Nearly 700,000 then served in the Middle East, fighting with great distinction against the Turks in the Mesopotamian campaign. Indians served on the Gallipoli peninsula, and others went to East and West Africa, and even to China.

    Participants from the Indian subcontinent won 13,000 medals, including 12 Victoria Crosses. By the end of the war a total of 47,746 Indians had been reported dead or missing; 65,126 were wounded.

    Some 100,000 Gurkhas from Nepal took part in fighting during the First World War. Two Victoria Crosses – the supreme award for valour – were won by Gurkhas.

    Their Own Stories
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    Sepoy Khudadad Khan VC, 129th Battalion, Duke of Connaught’s Own Baluchi Regiment Subadar Khudadad Khan VC

    Khudadad Khan was born in the Punjab (now in Pakistan) in 1887. His family were Pathans who had moved to the Punjab from the North-West Frontier between India and Afghanistan. He joined the army as a sepoy or private soldier for the sake of regular pay and a chance of honour and glory.

    In October 1914, almost immediately after arriving in France, the 129th Baluchis were among 20,000 Indian soldiers sent to the front line. Their job was to help the exhausted and depleted soldiers of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) to prevent the advancing Germans from capturing the vital ports of Boulogne in France and Nieuwpoort in Belgium. If the Germans could manage to take Boulogne and Nieuwpoort, they would choke off the BEF’S supplies of food and ammunition, and the Allies would lose the war.

    Troops of the 129th Baluchis man a trench during the First Battle of Ypres, October 1914
    Troops of the 129th Baluchis man a trench during the First Battle of Ypres, October 1914
    © Imperial War Museum

    The 129th Baluchis, with whom Khudadad Khan was serving as a machine-gunner, faced the well-equipped German army in appalling conditions - shallow waterlogged trenches in which to take cover, a lack of hand grenades and barbed wire, and a dire shortage of soldiers to man the defensive line. They were also outnumbered five to one. When the Germans attacked on 30 October, most of the Baluchis were pushed back. But Khudadad Khan’s machine-gun team, along with one other, fought on, preventing the Germans from making the final breakthrough. The other gun was disabled by a shell, and eventually Khudadad Khan’s own team was over-run. All the gunners were killed by bullets or bayonets except the badly wounded Khudadad Khan. He pretended to be dead until the attackers had gone on - then, despite his wounds, he managed to make his way back to his regiment.

    Thanks to his bravery, and that of his fellow Baluchis, the Germans were held up just long enough for Indian and British reinforcements to arrive. They strengthened the line, and prevented the German army from reaching the vital ports.

    Sepoy Khudadad Khan recovered from his wounds in an English hospital, and three months later was decorated by King George V at Buckingham Palace in London with the Victoria Cross, Britain’s highest award ‘For Valour’. He was the first Indian to receive the award.

    Khudadad Khan returned to India, and continued to serve in the Indian Army. In 1971 he died at home in Pakistan, aged 84. Several of his descendants now live in England.


    Subedar Manta Singh: 2nd Sikh Royal Infantry
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    Manta Singh was born in the Punjab, northern India. In 1907, as soon as he left the village school, he joined the 2nd Sikh Royal Infantry. By August 1914, when the German army invaded Belgium and France, Manta held the rank of Subedar, and his regiment was part of the Indian Expeditionary Force sent to France.
    Manta Singh
    In March 1915 the Allies attacked Neuve-Chapelle and broke through the German front line. On the first day of the battle, British and Indian troops captured the town. Then the Germans counter-attacked with 16,000 reinforcements. In three days’ fighting, the British and Indian troops suffered 13,000 casualties. The Allies’ ammunition ran out, and the troops had to retreat. 5,021 Indian soldiers - about 20 per cent of the Indian contingent - were killed in heavy fighting, and Manta Singh was injured in action after helping to save the life of an injured officer, Captain Henderson. (In the Second World War, the sons of both of these men served side by side and became lifelong friends.)

    Manta Singh was sent back to England, to a hospital in Brighton. The doctors told him that he would have to lose both his legs, as they had become infected with gangrene. Manta refused to think about going back to India with no legs - what use would he be to his family? Unfortunately, he died from blood poisoning a few weeks later. He was cremated in a ghat, according to Sikh beliefs.

    In 1993 Manta Singh’s son, Lt Col Assa Singh Johal, was part of a delegation of the Undivided Indian Ex-Servicemen’s Association that visited the Indian war memorial at Neuve-Chapelle. Assa Singh said, "It was a moving visit of great sentimental value to us. We were able to remember and pay homage to the fallen in foreign lands."

    http://www.mgtrust.org/ind1.htm


    "Some have learnt many Tricks of sly Evasion, Instead of Truth they use Equivocation, And eke it out with mental Reservation, Which is to good Men an Abomination."

    I don't have to attend every argument I'm invited to.

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