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Thread: Sino US Military Exchanges

  1. #61
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    US says reached dual-use trade deal with China
    http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssT...37694320090113

    WASHINGTON, Jan 13 (Reuters) - The United States has reached a deal with China clearing the way for full implementation of a trade program for dual-use technology goods, the Commerce Department said on Tuesday.

    "We are pleased to have reached this milestone agreement," Commerce Under Secretary Mario Mancuso said in a statement just one week before the Bush administration leaves office.

    "U.S. exporters now have a more streamlined way to export to companies in China who have a record of using U.S. technology responsibly," Mancuso said.

    The agreement is good news for U.S. aircraft manufacturer Boeing Co. (BA.N) and Applied Materials Inc. (AMAT.O), the world's biggest supplier of machines used to make semiconductors.

    The two companies have partners in China cleared to import certain advanced technology goods that also have potential military uses.

    The Commerce Department in 2007 imposed new export controls on a targeted list of high-tech goods sought by China's military, such as lasers, high-performance computers, extreme temperature telecommunications equipment and airborne communication and inertial navigation systems.

    At the same time, it established a new "validated end user" program to allow pre-screened civilian companies in China to import certain controlled items without having to obtain an individual Commerce Department license.

    Last month, Mancuso said the Commerce Department was considering suspending the program because it had not reached an agreement covering surprise inspection procedures for the five companies in China approved to participate.

    The two countries have now reached a pact that "will maximize the security and trade-enhancing benefits of the VEU program and continue a promising chapter in civilian U.S.-China high technology trade," Mancuso said.

    (Reporting by Doug Palmer)

  2. #62
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    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...illage/?page=3

    China-US Military exchanges

    Thursday, January 8, 2009


    The Pentagon's most senior China policy official went to Beijing last month to discuss resuming military exchanges that were halted by China over the announced $6.5 billion arms package to Taiwan.

    Defense officials said David Sedney, deputy assistant secretary of defense, was in China from Dec. 17-19 and sought to convince Chinese military officials that resuming the exchange program will be in the interest of U.S.-China relations.

    However, according to the officials who declined to be named because of the sensitivities of the exchanges, China is continuing its halt of the military exchange program, which is a centerpiece of Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates' policy of seeking to develop confidence-building ties to the Chinese military.

    Asked about the meetings, Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman did not address the Chinese halt in an e-mail response. He said discussions between Mr. Sedney and Chinese Lt. Gen. Chen Xiaogong, assistant chief of the general staff, and Maj. Gen. Qian Lihua, director of the Defense Ministry Foreign Affairs Office, included "regional and global defense issues and U.S.-China defense relations."

    "The discussions were candid, productive and constructive and will serve as a foundation upon which our two militaries can build toward a stronger relationship," Mr. Whitman stated.

    China halted the exchanges, which have been under way since the late 1990s, after the Pentagon notified Congress in October that it planned to sell Taiwan $6.5 billion in arms, including advanced Patriot missile defenses, Apache attack helicopters and submarine-launched anti-ship missiles.

    Mr. Whitman said the meeting was an important time to "reflect upon the course of development of U.S.-China military-to-military relations over the past 30 years, highlighting more recent developments that have contributed to improved communications and enhanced understanding."

    The two sides also tried to "look forward" and "explore areas where we can improve cooperation," he said.

    Without addressing the Chinese halt in exchanges, Mr. Whitman said Mr. Sedney told the Chinese that the U.S. side "welcomes the progress in military-to-military relations during 2008." He noted the launch of a Pentagon-to-Defense Ministry telephone hot line and the first round of talks on nuclear weapons policy and strategy.

    Additionally, the two sides talked about "setting a framework" for developing and planning the 2009 military-to-military contacts, he said.

    "They encouraged greater substance and the PLA movement toward transparency, both in our defense exchanges as well as globally," Mr. Whitman said. "They encouraged more substantive interactions at a strategic and policy level, as well as among mid-grade and junior officers and between military educational institutions."

    Topics of mutual concern during the talks included regional security and transnational security, including terrorism, arms proliferation, and piracy in South and Central Asia, Iran and the Horn of Africa.

    "Overall, we agreed with the Chinese that it is important to move forward in our defense relations," Mr. Whitman said.

    Asked if the Pentagon will cancel its arms sale to Taiwan as a condition for resuming military exchanges, Mr. Whitman said: "With respect to Taiwan arms sales, the U.S. policy is longstanding, well-understood, and will continue. The policy has contributed to peace and stability - both foundations for shared prosperity - for almost 30 years."

    The Chinese military's official newspaper Liberation Army Daily reported Dec. 19 that "China-U.S. military relations are currently going through a difficult period, and the onus is not on the Chinese side."

  3. #63
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    China, U.S. Reach Accord on Advanced Technology Trade Program
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    By Mark Drajem

    Jan. 13 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. and China reached an agreement on a trade program for advanced technology that may aid companies such as Boeing Co. and Applied Materials Inc.

    The agreement clears the way for American officials to conduct surprise inspections of the facilities of Chinese companies that want to be pre-screened for the program. If approved, the companies can receive advanced technology for civilian use, such as aircraft parts and computer hardware, which could be exploited for military purposes.

    The Commerce Department had threatened to suspend the existing program without an agreement on surprise inspections.

    “We are pleased to have reached this milestone agreement with China, one of our nation’s most important trading partners,” said Mario Mancuso, the top Commerce Department official for the export controls.

    Saving the program would help Boeing, the world’s No. 2 commercial-plane maker, and Applied Materials, the largest maker of chip-production machinery, which had partners in China cleared to buy their equipment.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Mark Drajem in Washington at mdrajem@bloomberg.net

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    No thaw yet in U.S.-China military ties - U.S. admiral
    Fri Feb 6, 2009 2:16am IST

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    By Andrew Gray

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The head of U.S. forces in the Pacific said on Thursday China had made no overtures to revive dialogue with the U.S. military since President Barack Obama took office but he was optimistic ties would improve.

    China broke off high-level contacts with the U.S. military in October after the United States agreed a $6.5 billion arms sale to Taiwan, which Beijing considers a renegade province.

    "I have seen no change since the new administration came in," Navy Admiral Timothy Keating, the head of U.S. Pacific Command, told Reuters in an interview at the Pentagon.

    "We do have ongoing dialogue with ... certain folks in China," Keating said. "We would much prefer it to be a more formal, a more regular and a more frequent dialogue than it is right now and that's what we're working to achieve."

    The United States has repeatedly called on China to explain the intentions behind the modernization of its armed forces and large increases in its military budget in recent years.

    Beijing has stated it is committed to a "peaceful rise" alongside its rapid economic development and rejected U.S. accusations it has not been transparent.

    Keating said the United States wanted to encourage "responsible behavior" by China.

    He said he was heartened by Chinese participation in international anti-piracy efforts off the coast of Somalia. Chinese vessels were in contact with U.S. Navy ships there, he said. "There is ongoing dialogue at the tactical level so we are encouraged by that," Keating said.

    "We think that there are ways for China to integrate into naval coalitions, to help with humanitarian disaster relief, so as to reflect a willingness to cooperate and collaborate," he said. "I'm optimistic about it."

    U.S. and Chinese military officials exchanged visits throughout 2007 and 2008 until the Taiwan arms deal was announced, said Keating, who visited China twice as Pacific Command chief.

    He said he hoped such contacts could resume as part of a return to more dialogue with the Chinese military.

    http://in.reuters.com/article/worldN...090205?sp=true

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    China, US to resume military talks: report

    1 hour ago

    BEIJING (AFP) — China and the United States will resume military consultations this month that were postponed last year when Washington announced a planned weapons sale to Taiwan, state press said Sunday.

    The defence consultations will be held in Beijing on February 27-28, the People's Daily reported on its website, citing an unnamed official with the US Department of Defence.

    "We want to continue exchanges with China and are seeking positive cooperative ties," the official was quoted as saying.

    The defence talks will resume only days after US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton makes her first visit to China from February 20-22 as the top envoy of the new administration of US President Barack Obama, the report said.

    The talks will take place once a year and could include discussions on the fight against global terrorism, it said.

    China called off high-level military exchanges last October after the Pentagon notified Congress that it planned to sell 6.5 billion dollars of military hardware to Taiwan.

    Beijing said the sales threatened Sino-US defence cooperation.

    But defence ministry spokesman Colonel Hu Changming said last month that China was willing to resume military cooperation with the Obama administration.

    "In this new period we hope that both China and the US could make joint efforts to create favourable conditions and improve and promote military-to-military relations," Hu said.

    "We call on the US to remove the obstacles to the growth of military relations between the two countries and to create favourable conditions for the healthy growth of military relations."

    Subsequently the navies of China and the United States have shared information in the fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia, where both nations have sent military vessels, the report said.

    Since the end of a civil war in 1949, China has viewed Taiwan as a breakaway territory awaiting reunification, by force if necessary, while the United States has pledged to defend the island.

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    China, US to restart military dialogue in Feb.

    China, US to restart military dialogue in Feb.By Cui Xiaohuo (China Daily)
    Updated: 2009-02-16 07:33
    The mainland and the US will resume their military talks with a defense policy dialogue in Beijing on Feb 27-28, both countries' officials have said.
    The dialogue between the countries' senior military officers was postponed in November after the former George W. Bush administration announced in October to sell $6.5 billion worth of arms to Taiwan despite the mainland's protest.

    The dialogue will be informal, Defense Ministry spokesman Hu Changming said yesterday.

    The talks, a routine yearly meeting between Washington and Beijing since 1997, is likely to be hosted by a US deputy defense minister and a deputy chief of the mainland's army, military analysts said.

    Japan's Kyodo News Agency quoted a US Defense Department official as having said over the weekend that David Sedney, US assistant secretary of defense for East Asia, will lead the US team at the talks.

    The talks will focus on the expansion of bilateral military cooperation and joint implementation of measures to address security concerns across the world, especially in East Asia, the official said.

    "The (Barack) Obama administration has set a positive tone to work with the mainland," said Rear Admiral Yang Yi, senior military expert with the University of National Defense. "So the US Defense Department must have worked closely with the State Department to schedule the dialogue right after Secretary of State Hilary Clinton's visit."

    "If one sees the dialogue from this perspective, it is not just about the military (because) it indicates that defense policies will play a vital role in bilateral ties in the near future," Yang said.

    On the eve of her first overseas tour as secretary of state, Clinton said her administration would use "smart power" to work with historic allies and emerging countries in order to find regional and global solutions to common global problems.

    "And we look forward to improved relations across the Straits," Clinton said while addressing a gathering of Asia Society in New York.

    She said the US and the mainland would resume mid-level military discussions by this month. She will arrive in Beijing on Friday to discuss the global financial crisis, regional security and climate change.

    Military talks are usually the first to be called off during strained Sino-US ties and are last to resume after normalization, analysts said. And this time it is no exception.

    The Obama administration, which has asked Robert Gates to continue as the defense secretary, is clear that the US and the mainland have common interests in key areas, said Luo Yuan, a military expert with the Academy of Military Science.

    "Since the security situation across the Straits has taken a significant and positive turn, the two militaries can discuss more far-reaching issues, including non-traditional security," Luo said. "It's a great time to start real dialogue."

    Peng Kuang and Zhang Haizhou contributed to the story

    http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2...nt_7478350.htm

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    Rights may take second place on Clinton China visit
    http://uk.reuters.com/article/worldN...51J3TM20090220
    By Arshad Mohammed

    BEIJING (Reuters) - The United States will press China on human rights but this will not keep them from working together on the financial crisis, climate change and North Korea, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Friday.

    Clinton, who openly criticized China's human rights record in a 1995 speech in Beijing, told reporters there is a certain predictability to U.S.-Chinese disagreements on political freedoms, U.S. arms sales to Taiwan and the status of Tibet.

    The United States has long accused China of human rights abuses, has pressed Beijing to grant greater autonomy to Tibet and has sold arms to Taiwan, which Beijing views as a renegade province.

    Making her first trip abroad as secretary of state, Clinton said three of her top priorities in Beijing will be addressing the global economic crisis, climate change and security challenges such as the North Korean nuclear weapons programme.

    "Now, that doesn't mean that questions of Taiwan, Tibet, human rights, the whole range of challenges that we often engage on with the Chinese, are not part of the agenda," Clinton told reporters in Seoul before flying to Beijing. "But we pretty much know what they are going to say.

    "We have to continue to press them but our pressing on those issues can't interfere with the global economic crisis, the global climate change crisis and the security crises," she added. "We have to have a dialogue that leads to an understanding and cooperation on each of those."

    Making her final stop on a week-long tour of Asia that earlier took her to Tokyo, Jakarta and Seoul, Clinton said she hoped to sound out the Chinese leadership on what more it may do to push North Korea to abandon its nuclear programmes.

  8. #68
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    dammit,

    vacation is over :(
    There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there has always been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "My ignorance is just as good as your knowledge."- Isaac Asimov

  9. #69
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    talking again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWFalcon View Post
    I don't understand these types of military exchanges. What do we gain from letting China come to the Pentagon, and look at our systems and such?
    because,it is US,not China,want a more transparent military of China.and we said "it is unfair",we show know more about each other.not the style I show fact to you,but you won't show fact to me.

  11. #71
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    Oh, US knows alot more about Chinese military than you think. Have you read some of the works by major US thank tanks? I will take their analysis over PLA daily anyday. China was so impressed by the works done by US Naval War College, one of its researchers, Andrew Erickson was invited to China to give lectures.

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    U.S., China End Talks With Plans for More
    Military Dialogue Described as Frank and Open

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...022801868.html




    BEIJING, Feb. 28 -- China and the Obama administration concluded their first military consultations Saturday without setting a timetable for high-level exchanges while agreeing to begin working-level talks Monday.

    The discussions reflected the Chinese military's greater international role and followed Beijing's suspension of most military contacts in October after the United States announced a $6.5 billion arms sale to Taiwan, which China considers a wayward province.

    Factors including the new U.S. administration, the depth of the American financial crisis, China's increased confidence, and growing instability in Afghanistan and Pakistan have combined to produce the most frank and open talks in years, experts and participants said.

    "These were the best set of talks that I have ever been part of," said David Sedney, deputy assistant secretary of defense for East Asia, who co-chaired the annual Defense Policy Coordination Talks. "Not because we pretended that everything was fine and everything was resolved, but because we worked very seriously to address the obstacles while at the same time engaging in some discussions in some of the new areas like counterpiracy."
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    China's Defense Ministry declined repeated requests for comment. "China-U.S. military relations remain difficult," Maj. Gen. Qian Lihua, director of the ministry's Foreign Affairs Office, told state-run media as the talks began Friday. "We expect the United States to take concrete measures for the resumption and development of our military ties."

    But by Saturday, both sides had agreed to continue the exchange.

    Sedney's entourage included representatives from the U.S. Pacific Command, the Joint Staff, the State Department and the U.S. Central Command, which briefed the Chinese on President Obama's recent decision to send 17,000 additional troops to Afghanistan.

    "The kinds of discussions we had about Pakistan and Afghanistan, that was an area where we had a new level of dialogue that we hadn't had before," Sedney said.

    China has been holding military exercises with other countries and trying to see whether it has the leverage to push the United States to make concessions on Taiwan, analysts say. Since 1990, the People's Liberation Army has also sent 11,063 military personnel to participate in 18 peacekeeping operations, according to a recent government white paper on the military.

    "They're able to communicate with other navies out there. They're participating in the contact group on piracy and being a little more cooperative with other naval forces than I had expected," said Phillip Saunders, a senior research fellow at National Defense University. "They're trying to be seen as making a broader contribution. They don't want to be seen as only protecting their own interests."

    But the PLA's main goal remains defending the position and interests of the Communist Party leadership, a purpose unaltered by the military's active new diplomacy and recent improvements in China's relationship with Taiwan.

    "Washington wants transparency and confidence-building, which are threatening from the perspective of the Chinese Communist Party, so Beijing engages in military-to-military dialogues for appearance' sake but uses them as a battle ground to wrest political concessions from Washington," said Rick Fisher, senior fellow with the International Assessment and Strategy Center.

    Others say the resumption of military talks less than two months after President Bush left office demonstrates China's hopes for a fresh start.

    "Because of self-confidence, because of the bad U.S. economy, because of domestic unrest, China has become harder to almost everyone who makes trouble: to France, to the Russians, to the E.U.," said Shi Yinhong, who runs the Center for American Studies at People's University in Beijing. "In this context, with the cooperation of [Secretary of State] Hillary Clinton, who had an almost perfect visit, China is saying it desires a good beginning with the Obama administration."

    Researcher Zhang Jie contributed to this report.

  13. #73
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    yes,US know alot about Chinese military.but they get those infos by analyzations of their experts.not the cooperation of both sides.it's very different.

    you know more from experts when you recognize a nation as enemy,you know more from idea exchange when you recognize a nation as ally.I bet US know more infos of UK army than China.it is because US is the richest nation in the world,they can pay a lot of money to experts for what they want to know,that they get so much infos about China.but in fact,it is a much expensive way.

  14. #74
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    One word: Verification.

    I'd agree that improved communication and CBM will serve everyone involve better. But, is this what the "transparency" US and pretty much everyone are calling for?
    Last edited by xinhui; 01 Mar 09, at 19:44.

  15. #75
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    Must be the tea, they put something into the tea.



    US notes positive transformation in Chinese army

    The Associated Press
    Wednesday, March 4, 2009

    WASHINGTON: A senior Obama administration defense official on Wednesday described a changing Chinese military that is increasingly interested in cooperating with the United States to tackle crises around the world.

    But David Sedney, just back from high-level military talks in Beijing, also noted U.S. worries about the world's largest military force, including huge amounts of opaque defense spending, a weapons buildup across from rival Taiwan and arms sales to Iran that the Obama administration believes are hurting stability in the Middle East by fueling terrorism.

    "We believe that China, as a responsible international actor, should not be exporting conventional arms to Iran when Iran continues to supply arms to extremist groups in countries on its borders," Sedney, deputy assistant defense secretary for East Asia, told the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. He said Beijing signed arms agreements worth about $400 million with Iran over the last four years.

    Sedney had just returned to Washington after what he said were "positive" talks in Beijing with top Chinese military officials, the first formal dialogue between the People's Liberation Army and the new U.S. administration. China canceled or suspended nearly a dozen military exchanges with the United States last year, infuriated by a $6.5 billion U.S. arms sale to Taiwan.

    Sedney's comments before the congressional advisory commission came as Beijing announced a nearly 15 percent rise in military spending. That's a smaller boost than in previous years, and China's $70 billion military budget is dwarfed by U.S. military expenditures. But it is still a large amount of spending on a military whose intentions the United States wants to know more about.

    Sedney said he looks forward to answers from Beijing about why it continues to invest so much money in its military even as it tells Washington about the need to address massive social and economic problems within China. The United States, he said, has not seen a change in China's huge military buildup opposite Taiwan, the self-governing island that China claims as its own.

    But Sedney also talked more broadly, and more positively, about what he called the beginning of a transformation in the Chinese army's leadership — from a sharp focus on internal stability and the actions of its neighbors, to a willingness to participate in international relief, anti-piracy and peacekeeping efforts and in military-to-military exchanges with other countries.

    Sedney said that during his meetings in China he saw "real signs" that a new generation of military leaders are "grappling with the issue of how does China work together with the United States, and others, to address common problems."

    Sedney also sought to ease Chinese worries about U.S. intentions, saying the United States is "not interested in containing China."

    "China's interests will continue to expand," Sedney said. "That's normal, that's natural, and we welcome that."

    Also Wednesday, the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank released a report, co-chaired by former Defense Secretary William Cohen, that questioned whether the world's most serious economic, security and climate issues could be solved without joint U.S.-China action.

    The two countries must overcome the "strategic mistrust" each feels as it pursues policies meant to boost its own welfare and security. Those goals, the report said, can best be met through diplomatic, economic, military and political cooperation, not by acting alone.
    http://www.iht.com/bin/printfriendly.php?id=20591252

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