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Thread: Naval Quiz

  1. #5971
    Military Professional JCT's Avatar
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    Ok, going to try and get this going again with an easy one:

    So how did Naval Station North Island, San Diego, get it's name? It's part of Coronado and isn't an island.
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  2. #5972
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    It wasn't officially called a peninsula until 2010 by decree of the Coronado City Council. Up till then people called it Coronado Island. I called it Coronado Island in 1968. Consequently I could see it easily being called North Island since it was at the end of Coronado Island. It was truly an island 7,000-14,000 years ago after a glacial period. After that it was protected by Point Loma during winter storms but in the summer, storms from the south, would push sand to form the Silver Strand connecting it to Imperial Beach of today. Yet even in the 1900's the Silver Strand would flood and cut off access to the south and leaving just the Coronado Ferry. The Navy Base located there in 1917 when most called it Coronado Island. So I'm going to say it was called that because that is what residents called Coronado and even today many residents are still fuming it is now called a peninsula. So tradition...?

    Now looking back in time at geology for maps of the area I find that North Island was separated from "South Island" where the Hotel Del Coronado is. That lead me to look for other clues and I found this. Note the map calling it Peninsula of San Diego. The spit of sand is pretty obvious.

    On November 11, 2017, Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) celebrated 100 Years of Naval Aviation. NASNI has been coined the Birthplace of Naval Aviation, specifically, “on August 15, 1963, the station was granted official recognition as the ‘Birthplace of Naval Aviation’ by resolution of the House Armed Services Committee.” (Wikipedia) How did it get that name? In 1910, Coronado was still separated by the Spanish Bight, creating a desolate North Island and a developing South Island that included the Hotel del Coronado. The US Army was the first to claim the open north area for aviation training purposes. A few years later the Navy then made North Island an operating airfield.
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  3. #5973
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    It wasn't officially called a peninsula until 2010 by decree of the Coronado City Council. Up till then people called it Coronado Island. I called it Coronado Island in 1968. Consequently I could see it easily being called North Island since it was at the end of Coronado Island. It was truly an island 7,000-14,000 years ago after a glacial period. After that it was protected by Point Loma during winter storms but in the summer, storms from the south, would push sand to form the Silver Strand connecting it to Imperial Beach of today. Yet even in the 1900's the Silver Strand would flood and cut off access to the south and leaving just the Coronado Ferry. The Navy Base located there in 1917 when most called it Coronado Island. So I'm going to say it was called that because that is what residents called Coronado and even today many residents are still fuming it is now called a peninsula. So tradition...?

    Now looking back in time at geology for maps of the area I find that North Island was separated from "South Island" where the Hotel Del Coronado is. That lead me to look for other clues and I found this. Note the map calling it Peninsula of San Diego. The spit of sand is pretty obvious.
    Good! Back in the day North Island was indeed separated from the rest of Coronado. As seen from this aerial photo from 1935, a line of breakers and a bridge separated North Island from the rest of Coronado. At some point this was filled in and developed.
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  4. #5974
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    Turkey Fan,

    Are you going to post anything?
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  5. #5975
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Give me 24 hours. I've been gone and just returned last night.

  6. #5976
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    Guns up!!!
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  7. #5977
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    During the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal several US ships located the Japanese using radar which was fairly new to them. Getting the information over to Adm. Callaghan was fraught with many problems. In the meantime, when he gets information, Callaghan is trying to see the range and bearing information with his limited sight vision not to mention his suspicion of this new technology. The confusion of coordinating the new technology and it's information, while in battle, lead to WHAT being created on Navy ships in 1943?

  8. #5978
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    Combat Information Centers (CICs)
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  9. #5979
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    Correct.

    Many might have thought that CIC was a given. Then I read an after action battle report of the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and saw the recommendations concerning a place for coordinating all incoming information and realized the concept would be CIC.

  10. #5980
    Military Professional JCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbm3fan View Post
    Correct.

    Many might have thought that CIC was a given. Then I read an after action battle report of the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and saw the recommendations concerning a place for coordinating all incoming information and realized the concept would be CIC.
    Sort of a funny anecdote. The Naval services often tend to spell out acronyms when spoken aloud (although often not true), CIC is usually pronounced "C-I-C" instead of "siss". Army ops centers are often called Tactical Operations Centers, pronounced "Tock" instead of "T-O-C" like I would tend to say it. The USMC has its own variant though, we call our ops centers Combat Operations Center and pronounce it "C-O-C". While in Djibouti, I was showing one of the Army Company Commanders my COC, he walked in, saw the sign on the door, laughed, and said, "So you work in a C0ck?"

    Ok, score one for the Army.

  11. #5981
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCT View Post
    Sort of a funny anecdote. The Naval services often tend to spell out acronyms when spoken aloud (although often not true), CIC is usually pronounced "C-I-C" instead of "siss". Army ops centers are often called Tactical Operations Centers, pronounced "Tock" instead of "T-O-C" like I would tend to say it. The USMC has its own variant though, we call our ops centers Combat Operations Center and pronounce it "C-O-C". While in Djibouti, I was showing one of the Army Company Commanders my COC, he walked in, saw the sign on the door, laughed, and said, "So you work in a C0ck?"

    Ok, score one for the Army.

    Ahh, I do miss the emojis!!!
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  12. #5982
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    What unusual honor was conferred on the USS O'Bannon?
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  13. #5983
    Defense ProfessionalSenior Contributor tbm3fan's Avatar
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    All I know is that she had more battle stars than any destroyer and she also found good use of her potatoes. I am still trying to picture, to this day, ammunition ready lockers filled with potatoes to throw.

  14. #5984
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    Bingo on the taters!

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    From the wiki...

    Retiring from such a run early 5 April, O'Bannon sighted the Japanese submarine Ro-34 on the surface and made to ram it. At the last moment, the officers decided that the sub may be a minelayer, and the rudder was turned hard to avoid the collision. This action brought the destroyer directly alongside the sub. As the Japanese sailors attempted to man their three-inch deck gun, the O'Bannon's deck hands, not having side arms, grabbed potatoes from nearby storage bins and pelted the Japanese with them.[2] Thinking the potatoes were hand grenades, the submarine's sailors were too occupied with throwing them away from the sub to fire. This gave the O'Bannon the opportunity to distance itself to fire its guns at the sub and damage the conning tower. Although the sub still managed to submerge, O'Bannon used depth charges to finally sink it. During this period, the O'Bannon also splashed at least two enemy aircraft in various attacks.
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

  15. #5985
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    TBM Fan, you're up!
    We must be...increasingly on the alert to prevent them from taking over other mineshaft space, in order to breed more prodigiously than we do, thus, knocking us out in superior numbers when we emerge! Mr. President, we must not allow...a mine shaft gap!
    - General Buck Turgidson

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