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Thread: Land Forces Quiz

  1. #1171
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlvfr View Post
    The only UK-related Grand Slam I know of was the aviation 10-ton bomb...
    Not the answer I was looking for, but I'll take it. ;-)

    You're up.
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  2. #1172
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    Two operational tanks of the same nation and period used this name, for a few months, causing confusion to latter day historians. What is the name?

  3. #1173
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    Hint: both saw action before 1950.

  4. #1174
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

  5. #1175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    Nope, those have diferent names, not the same.

  6. #1176
    Senior Contributor DonBelt's Avatar
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    M-46 and M-47 Patten tanks?

  7. #1177
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonBelt View Post
    M-46 and M-47 Patten tanks?
    Nope. Same name on 2 tanks. Like Merkava, or Chieftain.

  8. #1178
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    From the UK...

  9. #1179
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlvfr View Post
    From the UK...
    Matilda I and Matilda II?
    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

  10. #1180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    Bingo! Your turn.

  11. #1181
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    A double-barrelled question featuring.... double-barrelled weapons.

    What are these weapons? Hint: they were both used during the American Civil War.



    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

  12. #1182
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    A chain shot cannon and a rather rare French built a pinfire LeMat revolver. The pinfire is more rare than the percussion and center fire variants.

    The double barrel cannon posed issues with getting both barrels to fire simultaneously (one would not like the one ball and chain to pull the other ball out of the other barrel). The concept is curious as the earlier chained demasting rounds had been used for decades.
    Last edited by surfgun; 29 May 18, at 00:19.

  13. #1183
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Correct.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LeMat_Revolver
    The LeMat revolver was a .42 or .36 caliber cap & ball black powder revolver invented by Jean Alexandre LeMat of New Orleans, which featured an unusual secondary 20 gauge smooth-bore barrel capable of firing buckshot. It saw service with the armed forces of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War of 1861–65 and the Army of the Government of National Defense during the Franco-Prussian War.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-barreled_cannon
    In 1862 Georgia dentist, builder, and mechanic John Gilleland raised money from a coterie of Confederate citizens in Athens, Georgia, to build the ultimate chain-shot gun for a cost of $350. Cast in one piece, the gun featured side-by-side bores, each a little over 3 inches in diameter and splayed slightly outward so the shots would diverge and stretch the chain taut. The two barrels have a divergence of 3 degrees, and the cannon was designed to shoot simultaneously two cannonballs connected with a chain to "mow down the enemy somewhat as a scythe cuts wheat". During tests the Gilleland cannon effectively mowed down trees, tore up a cornfield, knocked down a chimney and killed an unfortunate cow. None of the above were anywhere near the gun's intended target.

    Execution

    Gilleland's invention was a failure. When it was first tested, on April 22, 1862, and aimed at a target of two upright poles, uneven combustion of the powder and casting imperfections in the barrels gave the connected balls a spinning movement in an off-center direction, with witnesses reporting that on its first firing it "plowed up about an acre of ground, tore up a cornfield, mowed down saplings, and then the chain broke, the two balls going in different directions."[1]

    On its second firing, the chain shot across the horizon and into a thicket of pine. "[The] thicket of young pines at which it was aimed looked as if a narrow cyclone or a giant mowing machine had passed through," reported another witness.[1]

    On its third firing, the chain snapped immediately and one ball tore into a nearby cabin, knocking down its chimney; the other spun off erratically and struck a nearby cow, killing it instantly. Gilleland considered the test-firings a success.[1]

    Civil War use

    Gilleland tried to promote his invention to the Confederate States Army's arsenal in Augusta, Georgia, where it was found unfit for its purpose. He continued to try to promote his invention to other military leaders around Augusta, but failed to interest anyone. Finally his contraption was used as a signal gun in Athens to warn against advancing Yankees.

    On 27 July 1864, the cannon was fired after a report was heard of several thousand Union soldiers approaching Monroe, Georgia. However, this report turned out to be false. The cannon disappeared in 1891 and was found again ten years later.
    Your question.
    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

  14. #1184
    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    What was the standard caliber of French Military Flintlock Pistols?

  15. #1185
    Former Staff Senior Contributor Ironduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ironduke View Post
    I took the time to look up a photo of the Matilda I.

    All I can say is, wow. I want one.

    What I don't want to see is the Bills winning a Super Bowl. As long as I'm alive that doesn't happen.

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