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Thread: USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1)

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    JRT
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    USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1)

    The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command has accepted delivery of the Navy's first joint high-speed vessel, USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1).


    Link to Austal's JHSV product webpage.

    Link to Austal's JHSV data sheet (pdf).





    Navy takes delivery of JHSV-1

    06 December 2012
    Marine Log

    The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command yesterday accepted delivery of the Navy's first joint high-speed vessel at Austal USA's Mobile, Ala., shipyard.

    Craig Perciavalle, Sr. Vice President of Austal USA, represented the shipbuilder at the signing event.

    Austal USA Interim President and CFO Brian Leathers commented: "The delivery of the USNS Spearhead is a significant achievement for Austal and adds to the rich history of Mobile as a hub of shipbuilding activity in the United States. Austal USA has delivered 12 ships in 11 years, certainly a major contributor to the shipbuilding legacy of Mobile, Alabama."

    MSC will own and operate Spearhead and the eight other JHSVs that are under contract, with the option of a ninth additional vessel, to be built for the Navy. Spearhead is crewed by 22 civil service mariners working for MSC who will operate, navigate and maintain the ship.

    "Flexibility may be the best attribute of this ship," said civilian Capt. Douglas D. Casavant, Jr., Spearhead's civil service master who has been sailing for MSC for 23 years. "Our 20,000-square-foot mission bay area can be reconfigured to quickly adapt to whatever mission we are tasked with, for instance, carrying containerized portable hospitals to support disaster relief or transporting tanks and troops."

    The JHSVs are capable of transporting approximately 600 tons of military troops, vehicles, supplies and equipment 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots, and can operate in shallow-draft, austere ports and waterways, providing U.S. forces added mobility and flexibility.

    The JHSVs' aviation flight deck can support day and night flight operations for a wide variety of aircraft, including CH-53 Super Stallions. Each JHSV has sleeping accommodations for up to 42 crew members and 104 mission personnel; and airline-style seating for 312 people.

    As MSC assets, all of the JHSVs will be civilian-crewed. The first four of the 10 projected vessels, including Spearhead, will be crewed by civil service mariners, while the next six are slated to be crewed by civilian mariners working for a private company under contract to MSC. Military mission personnel will embark as required by mission sponsors.

    Following delivery to the Navy, Spearhead will participate in operational testing before sailing to its layberth in Little Creek, Va. The Navy expects the ship to begin conducting missions in the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

    The ships of the JHSV 1 class are designed to commercial standards, with limited modifications for military use. The vessel is capable of transporting 600 short tons at least 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots and can operate in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interfacing with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-loading a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank. Other features include an aviation flight deck to support day and night aircraft launch and recovery operations. JHSV 1 has airline-style seating for 312 embarked forces, with fixed berthing for 146.

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    Australia: Austal Wins USD 313 Million JHSV 6 and 7 Contract

    01 July 2011
    Industrial Marine Power



    The U.S. Navy has exercised contract options funding the construction of the sixth and seventh Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV), as part of a ten-vessel program potentially worth over US$1.6 billion. The construction contract for both vessels is valued at approximately US$313 million.
    Austal Chief Executive Officer, Andrew Bellamy, noted that this contract demonstrates the U.S. Navy’s confidence in Austal as a leading defence prime contractor.

    “With options remaining for a further three vessels, the JHSV program is expected to deliver a predictable revenue stream of AUD$330 million per annum from 2012 to 2015, which is approximately 60 per cent of Austal’s historical revenue.”

    As prime contractor, Austal was awarded the construction contract for the first 103-metre JHSV in November 2008, with options for nine additional vessels between FY09 and FY13. The Austal JHSV team includes platform systems engineering agent General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems who is responsible for the design, integration and testing of the ship’s mission systems, including internal and external communications, electronic navigation, and aviation and armament systems.

    Austal received authorisation from the Navy to start construction on the first vessel of the contract, Spearhead (JHSV 1), in December 2009 after completing the rigorous design over a 12-month period. Spearhead is scheduled for launch in August 2011 and delivery in December 2011. Construction on Vigilant (JHSV 2), began at Austal’s Mobile, Alabama, USA shipyard on September 13, 2010.

    Austal USA’s President and Chief Operating Officer Joe Rella remarked, “this award facilitates the continued development and growth of our U.S. operations, as well as the expansion of our Alabama workforce from over 2,000 to nearly 4,000.”

    Austal is also currently building a second Independence-variant 127-metre Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the U.S. Navy, Coronado (LCS 4), which is scheduled for launch in September 2011. As prime contractor, Austal recently received a U.S. Navy contract for construction of up to an additional 10 Littoral Combat Ships, including Jackson (LCS 6) and Montgomery (LCS 8), to be appropriated in the following five years, with a total value in excess of $3.5 billion. Once commissioned, these 10 vessels will join the Austal-built USS Independence (LCS 2) which was commissioned in January 2010.

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    Austal releases more JHSV details


    09 February 2009
    Marine Log

    Austal has now released some more details of its winning design for the Joint High Speed Vessel.



    The JHSV Program will provide high speed, shallow draft transportation capability to support the intra-theater maneuver of personnel, supplies and equipment for the U. S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Army.

    Austal was awarded a contract for the first JHSV on November 14, 2008. With options for up to nine additional ships and associated shore-based spares, the program is worth a potential $1.6 billion.

    The Austal JHSV is a round bilge, bulbous bow, catamaran with a length of 103.0 m (337.9 ft) and beam of 28.5 m (93.5 ft) and draft of 3.83 m (12.57 ft)..It features a 1,863 sq m (20,053 sq ft) mission bay-- an open plan deck that provides space for a range of military hardware, vehicles and small boats. Containerized and palletized cargo can also be transported on the deck.

    Though broadly similar to Austal designs such as the slightly larger Hawaii Superferry, it offers quite a few features not found on its commercial counterparts, weapons mounts among them.



    .


    The US Navy -- Fact File: Joint High Speed Vessel - JHSV

    Description
    The Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) is a shallow draft, all aluminum, commercial-based Catamaran capable of intra-theater personnel and cargo lift providing combatant commanders high-speed sealift mobility with inherent cargo handling capability and agility to achieve positional advantage over operational distances. Bridging the gap between low-speed sealift and high-speed airlift, the JHSV will transport personnel, equipment, and supplies over operational distances with access to littoral offload points including austere, minor and degraded ports in support of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT)/Theater Security Cooperation Program (TSCP); Intra-theater Operational/Littoral Maneuver and Sustainment; and Seabasing. The JHSV will enable the rapid projection, agile maneuver, and sustainment of modular, tailored forces in response to a wide range of military and civilian contingencies such as Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations, humanitarian assistance, and disaster relief.

    The JHSV is designed to transport 600 short tons of military cargo 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots in sea state 3. The ship is capable of operating in shallow-draft ports and waterways, interfacing with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-loading a combat-loaded Abrams Main Battle Tank (M1A2). The JHSV will includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that will allow vehicles to quickly drive off the ship. The ramp will be suitable for the types of austere piers and quay walls common in developing countries. JHSV�s shallow draft (about 13 feet (3.92 m)) will further enhance littoral operations and port access. This makes the JHSV an extremely flexible asset for support of a wide range of operations including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport.

    JHSV is a commercial-design, non-combatant transport vessel, and does not require the development of any new technology. JHSV is being built to American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) High Speed Naval Craft Guide HNSC 2007. Systems onboard will be based on commercial design and certified in accordance with ABS rules. As such, it does not require the survivability and ability to sustain damage like the LCS. It has no combat system capability and no ability to support or use LCS mission modules. It leverages non-developmental or commercial technology that is modified to suit military applications. Select military features include Aviation; Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and (Military) Intelligence; Firefighting for the Mission Bay; and four (4) .50 Caliber Machine Guns. NVR does not apply to any part of JHSV.

    JHSVs will have a crew of 22 people, but will have airline style seating for more than 312 embarked troops and fixed berthing for104. Military Sealift Command (MSC) will operate and sustain the JHSVs. JHSV will be allocated via Global Force Management (GFM) for Theater Security Cooperation (TSC), service unique missions, intra-theater sealift, and special missions.

    Background
    On Nov. 13, 2008, the Navy awarded Austal USA, Mobile, Ala., a $185,433,564 fixed-price incentive contract modification for detail design and construction (DD&C) of one Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV). The contract modification also includes options for the construction of up to nine additional ships and associated shore-based spares.

    Navy exercised options for JHSV 2 and JHSV 3 on January 28, 2010, JHSV 4 and JHSV 5 on October 12, 2010, JHSV 6 and JHSV 7 on June 30, 2011, and JHSV 8 and JHSV 9 on February 24, 2012. Start of construction of JHSV 2 began on September 13, 2010, JHSV 3 start of construction began on September 2, 2011 and construction on the JHSV 4 began May 7, 2012. JHSV 1 was christened USNS Spearhead September 17, 2011 and the Navy accepted delivery the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2013. . JHSV 2 was christened USNS Choctaw County September 15, 2012 and is expected to be delivered during the first half of 2013. The program initially divided the 10 prospective ships of the JHSV class into five ships for assignment to the Army and five ships for assignment to the Navy. However, both services agreed to transfer the Army's five JHSVs to the Navy at the Army/Navy Warfighter Talks in December 2010. Both departments signed a memorandum of agreement May 2 transferring all five of the Army's joint high-speed vessels to the Navy. All 10 JHSVs will now be assigned to the Navy.

    Point Of Contact
    Office of Corporate Communication (SEA 00D)
    Naval Sea Systems Command
    Washington, D.C. 20376

    General Characteristics

    Primary Function: The JHSV Program will provide high speed, shallow draft transportation capability to support the intra-theater maneuver of personnel, supplies and equipment for the U. S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Army.
    Builder: Austal USA

    Propulsion: Water Jet
    Length: 103 Meters (338 feet)
    Beam: 28.5 meters (93.5 feet)
    Displacement: 2500 metric tons (2460 long tons)
    Draft: 13 feet (3.92 meters)
    Speed: 35-40 knots
    Range: 1,200 nautical miles
    Crew: 22 civilian mariners
    Homeport: Not yet determined.
    Ships:
    USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), under construction - no homeport
    USNS Choctaw County (JHSV 2), under construction - no homeport
    Millinocket (JHSV 3), under construction - no homeport
    Fall River (JHSV 4), under construction - no homeport

    Last Update: 4 November 2012


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    NavSource Online: Service Ship Photo Archive
    USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1)
    Last edited by JRT; 07 Dec 12, at 00:24.
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  2. #2
    Senior Contributor Stitch's Avatar
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    So, it's basically a high-speed RO-RO?

    "Yeah. See, we plan ahead, that way we don't do anything right now. Earl explained it to me." - Tremors, 1990

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    Senior Contributor surfgun's Avatar
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    In addition to ro/ro it can carry marines. These could have been used in a theater such as Grenada or humanitarian efforts like Haiti. They would also be useful for the evacuation of US citizens from unstable countries.
    These ships may be deployed with LCS ships in non-traditional operations.
    Last edited by surfgun; 07 Dec 12, at 23:26.

  4. #4
    Senior Contributor Stitch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfgun View Post
    In addition to ro/ro it can carry marines. These could have been used in a theater such as Grenada or humanitarian efforts like Haiti. They would also be useful for the evacuation of US citizens from unstable countries.
    These ships may be deployed with LCS ships in non-traditional operations.
    I DO like the fact that it has a fairly large heli-deck on the rear (kinda like the LCS-2) large enough to handle a -53.

    "Yeah. See, we plan ahead, that way we don't do anything right now. Earl explained it to me." - Tremors, 1990

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