Page 1 of 153 12345678910 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 2283
Like Tree179Likes

Thread: Destroyers - Fletcher Class

  1. #1
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562

    Destroyers - Fletcher Class

    Introducing a thread for Fletcher Class Destroyers.

    A recent tour of the U.S.S. Kidd, ( DD-661) moored, Baton Rouge, LA provided the motivation to create a thread addressing a specific class of naval ship that generally is accepted by students of warships to be well designed.

    During the day long inspection of the Kidd, ( during low river stage) I was able to connect with the function of design for this class of naval vessel. Of note, many of the orginal features of the "as-built" Kidd remain today, or have been modified to "as built" condition.
    The course of this thread will extend with limits insuring that abusing bandwidth does not occur.

    Note for the academic historians, I'm not an expert on the Fletcher class, nor have I ever been charge with building a naval warship. The submittals that follow are for the viewer who desires to explore a ship they may not have access to in as great of detail as one would like (as will be provided through illustrations / pictures) or would care to join in participating with information that compliment the effort undertaken.

    Enough said:

    Step 1 : Introduction
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    05 Dec 08
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,434
    I have read, and found in my own design exercises that it is harder to design a destroyer than it is to design a larger ship, getting everything to fit and juggling things on a small displacement is the issue.

    I beleive the Fletcher class was an excellent design at the time, I look forward to your presentation
    Last edited by USSWisconsin; 01 Oct 10, at 21:58.
    "If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

  3. #3
    Military Professional dundonrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    23 Mar 07
    Posts
    616
    Quote Originally Posted by USSWisconsin View Post
    I have read, and found in my own design exercises that it is harder to design a destroyer than it is to design a larger ship, getting everything to fit and juggling things on a small displacement is the issue.

    I beleive the Fletcher class was an excellent design at the time, I look forward to your presentation

    and here we are, (have been for 30+ years) building "destroyers" that are the size of WW2 heavy cruisers.. (Arleigh Burke and Spruance class come to mind for size) and ,more firepower than any WW2 battleship could only have dreamed of (Arleigh Burke destroyers)

  4. #4
    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    05 Dec 08
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,434
    Quote Originally Posted by dundonrl View Post
    and here we are, (have been for 30+ years) building "destroyers" that are the size of WW2 heavy cruisers.. (Arleigh Burke and Spruance class come to mind for size) and ,more firepower than any WW2 battleship could only have dreamed of (Arleigh Burke destroyers)
    I suspect the Navy has found it hard to fit everything they need on a WWII destroyer displacement too But they do build the best destroyer in the world IMHO (AB).

    I was just thinking about what made the Fletchers such great destroyers, and realized the Main Gun Director and the 5"/38 with its excellent ammunition - VT and AP, were both enough to make almost any destroyer good - especially in AA duties. It will be interesting to study some of the other features that made the Fletcher such a good design.
    Last edited by USSWisconsin; 02 Oct 10, at 17:31.
    "If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

  5. #5
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562
    As the discussion of the Fletcher Class destroyer advances there will be many photographic illustrations which will provide the reader views not readily available when touring a naval warship. This is due to unique design undertaken by the USS Kidd Veterans Memorial Group in addressing the problems of silting and expense of a coffer dam when placing a ship on display with its O & M issues. The Kidd is "docked" @ Baton Rouge, Louisana on the Mississippi River. During those weeks when the River is running low, the Kidd rests on keel blocks and when the water is running high is floats while being "moored" to a structure permitting the Kidd to rise and fall. After inspecting the keel blocks I was left with the question if more ships being displayed could use this idea as a practical design to avoid the problem of resting in the mud. A significant event for a midwesterner landlocked from the sea is the opportunity to view the "as built" normally hidden below the water line.

  6. #6
    Defense Professional Dreadnought's Avatar
    Join Date
    12 May 05
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA.
    Posts
    14,659
    One mean motor scooter there.

    The best of all the destroyer classes beyongd doubt. (That is with exception to our latest)
    Fortitude.....The strength to persist...The courage to endure.

  7. #7
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562

    Keel laid

    This photo provides the starboard view of the USS Kidd's hull, roll chock and keel when the Mississippi River is low.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by blidgepump; 04 Oct 10, at 20:03.

  8. #8
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562
    On the port side the Kidd is secured fore and aft by two standards which allow the ship to rise and fall as the Mississippi River experiences seasonal stages. Orignally the design for mooring the Kidd was a cost saving effort to avoid the expense of a coffer dam. The design permits seasonal inspection of the hull and allows for scheduled repair. ( Note the barge used for painting and inspection tied off to the standard )
    This design seems to work well for display and maintenance. Would it work for larger ships? BB's, CV's ????
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by blidgepump; 05 Oct 10, at 14:01.

  9. #9
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562
    A closer examination details the tolerance for the "post & eye" permitting the Kidd to float or rest on its keel blocks while head fast.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #10
    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    05 Dec 08
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,434
    Great pictures.

    I have a question, are the small disks and block welded on the hull (post #7) anodes? If not what are they?

    Comment, The mooring system on the USS Texas looks like it is similar in principle (ring and stake) - though I beleive the hull block part is different.
    "If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

  11. #11
    Military Professional dundonrl's Avatar
    Join Date
    23 Mar 07
    Posts
    616
    no reason why it wouldn't work, except that all the BB/CV museums I know of are in salt water that dosn't rise/fall as much as the Mississippi river. Also her being in fresh water, none of the common problems you get with salt water and steel are going to happen, so she won't corrode anywhere near as fast nor will she get bottom fouling.

  12. #12
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562

    Kidd's Cradle

    From a layman's observation, it appears the manmade fenders attach to the upper ends of the Kidd's cradle. A closer inspection revealed that the centerline of the keel landed squarely. The uniform compression of the fenders indicates that some one truely understood the compound curves of the Kidd's hull and expressed that with a cradle displaying a hand in glove fit.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by blidgepump; 05 Oct 10, at 19:12.

  13. #13
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562
    Quote Originally Posted by dundonrl View Post
    no reason why it wouldn't work, except that all the BB/CV museums I know of are in salt water that dosn't rise/fall as much as the Mississippi river. Also her being in fresh water, none of the common problems you get with salt water and steel are going to happen, so she won't corrode anywhere near as fast nor will she get bottom fouling.
    The scouring of the Kidd's hull with fresh water from the melting snowpack and microfine aggregrate carried from the sandhills of Kansas & Nebraska seem to favor the destruction of micro organisms on the ships coating. No evidence of Bac - T to promote fouling was noted.

  14. #14
    Senior Contributor blidgepump's Avatar
    Join Date
    08 Jul 09
    Posts
    1,562

    More complete explanation .....

    I should of checked my photo stock of the Kidd. :smack:
    This jpeg provides a more complete explanation of the Kidd's mooring.
    At least it corrected the flatlander's use of the term dolphin in lieu of standard.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  15. #15
    Battleship Enthusiast Defense Professional USSWisconsin's Avatar
    Join Date
    05 Dec 08
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,434
    A Fletcher class destroyer even sank a battleship!

    Second Salvo at Surigao Strait
    Issue: Naval History Magazine - October 2010 Volume 24, Number 5
    By Admiral James L. Holloway III, U.S. Navy (Retired)
    Naval Historical Center
    More than six decades after the largest naval battle in history, the U.S. destroyer Bennion now can claim her rightful credit in the sinking of a Japanese battleship.
    Second Salvo at Surigao Strait | U.S. Naval Institute
    "If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees.
    If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children."

Page 1 of 153 12345678910 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. WWII Destroyers
    By Master Chief in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 23 Feb 13,, 00:29
  2. Iowa Class vs Kirov Class
    By eocoolj in forum Battleships Board
    Replies: 224
    Last Post: 12 Jun 08,, 00:02
  3. Modernized Iowa Class versus Essex WWII Carrier Class
    By talshiar in forum Battleships Board
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: 16 Aug 07,, 03:34
  4. What Should the Next Gen Destroyers....
    By Tibbetts in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 13 Jan 06,, 18:23
  5. Kidd Class vs Sovremmeney Class
    By BUFF in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 98
    Last Post: 03 Jan 05,, 04:42

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •