Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Navies News from around the world.

  1. #1
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651

    Navies News from around the world.

    Hoping to bring this sub ssection back to proper life I will be doing my best to keep us all up to date with whats happening around the world with regards to Naval Warfare



    US. is preparing to sell German-made submarines to Taiwan.

    German-made submarines in latest US arms package


    The United States is preparing to sell German-made submarines to Taiwan as part of its latest arms package. That's according to the US-based Foreign Policy magazine, which was quoted on the website of Hong-Kong newspaper Singtao.

    Foreign Policy reported that the United States may make an announcement on its latest arms deal to Taiwan before next Friday, when President Barack Obama will attend the UN Climate Change summit in Copenhagen. The package is not expected to include F-16C/D fighter jets but should include 60 Black Hawk helicopters.

    News agency Reuters also quoted remarks by US state department official Robert Kovac that the United States would sell four Type 214 submarines to Taiwan. The Type 214 submarine is developed and built in Germany and is currently operated by navies including South Korea and Turkey. It features an Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP) system to run at reduced noise and avoid detection.

    Militarium
    Last edited by Stan; 17 Dec 09, at 12:12.
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  2. #2
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    Third french BPC to be named "DIXMUDE"

    http://combatfleetoftheworld.blogspot.com/
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  3. #3
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    The Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in Pearl Harbor, HI awarded 6 indefinite-delivery/ indefinite-quantity multiple-award contracts worth up to a combined $140.4 million to provide maintenance, repair and modernization of submarines homeported or transient through Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  4. #4
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    Development of strategic nuclear fleet under threat?

    The unsuccessful Bulava missile test calls into question the entire development strategy Russia has chosen for its strategic nuclear forces. At present the Russian Navy plans to introduce eight Project 955 submarines armed with 16 R-30 Bulava ballistic missiles for strategic nuclear purposes in the next 10 to 12 years. The failed missile test calls these plans into question.

    At present, the first Project 955 ballistic missile submarine, the Yuri Dolgoruky, is being tested, while another two - the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh - are expected to be launched in 2010 and 2011 respectively. Construction is slated to begin on the fourth submarine in the series - called the Svyatitel Nikolai according to some sources - on December 22, 2009.

    After the failed Bulava missile test on December 9, 2009, the issue was raised once again of the feasibility of the current plan and possible alternatives to the Bulava. On December 11, Nikolai Kalistratov, the director of the Sevmash plant that builds the Project 955 nuclear submarines, said that it was necessary to consider the practicality of building a fourth Project 955 ballistic missile submarine in the absence of a "flying" missile. Some media sources have reported that initial construction of the new ballistic missile submarine had been postponed, although the Russian Defense Ministry denied these reports. Nevertheless, unnamed sources in the ministry subsequently reported that initial construction on the fourth Project 955 submarine had been postponed until the first quarter of 2010.

    The Bulava tests are expected to resume in the first quarter of next year: in March 2010 to be exact. A number of experts see a connection between these two events and believe the decision to continue building Project 955 submarines will depend on the results of the next missile launch.

    The Bulava is currently the only ballistic missile that can be deployed on the new submarines. There has been some discussion of refitting the Project 955 submarines to carry the liquid-fueled Sineva missile, but this would require considerable time and additional funding. Reviving the Bark Project, which was mothballed after work began on the Bulava, will take even more time, and, because of the size and weight of the missile, refitting the new submarines for the Bark would be even more difficult, if not outright impossible.

    There is also the option of using the Project 955 submarines that have already been built or are under construction as cruise missile submarines before they can be modified for the Bulava, similarly to how the U.S. Navy uses four out of its 18 existing Ohio-class nuclear submarines. This option would require the least amount of time and resources, but cruise missiles cannot serve as a satisfactory replacement for ballistic missiles.

    The core of Russia's strategic nuclear forces currently consists of 11 ballistic missile submarines armed with Makeyev Design Bureau missiles - five Project 667BDR nuclear submarines armed with R-29R missiles and six Project 667BDRMs nuclear submarines armed with R-29RM and R-29RMU Sineva missiles. Nevertheless, these vessels will be decommissioned in the near future due to their physical aging; the Project 667BDRs will be retired in the next five to seven years and the Project 667BDRMs in 10 to 20 years.

    Consequently, it is possible to predict the following scenarios if the next Bulava test is a failure:

    1. Missile submarine construction could be put on hold until the missile is finished or a new project of similar dimensions is developed. The completed Yuri Dolgoruky and the nearly-completed Project 955 nuclear submarines could be temporarily converted into cruise missile submarines similar to the refitted American Ohio-class missile submarines.

    2. Construction on the series could be halted until an upgraded Project 955 capable of carrying the Sineva can be developed. The completed Yuri Dolgoruky and the nearly completed Project 955 nuclear submarines could also be refitted for the Sineva by replacing the missile compartment, as was done during the Soviet era when a series of Project 667A missile submarines were upgraded.

    Both options would take a long time, and so the new fleet of strategic nuclear submarines could not actually be deployed until after 2015, which would require prolonging the service lives of the Project 667BDRM and possibly the Project 667BDR submarines. In addition, due to their age, considerable resources would have to be spent on overhauling and modernizing these older submarines to extend their service lives for the more or less long term.

    It is apparent that a failure to bring the Bulava missile to a state of operational readiness would entail spending many billions of rubles to ensure the combat readiness of the strategic nuclear fleet. Moreover, the possibility cannot be ruled out of a breakdown in the strategic nuclear fleet's capabilities in the second half of the 2010s or the early 2020s. This would increase the burden on the two remaining pillars of the security triad - the Strategic Missile Force and long-range aviation. In this case, additional spending would be required to increase the combat strength of these two pillars in light of decreasing naval capabilities.

    The reasons for such a situation are myriad, but Kalistratov clearly expressed the main reason in the aforementioned statement on December 11: "In both sports and in military hardware, you have to practice constantly. And we haven't practiced in this in our country for 15 years."

    MOSCOW. (RIA Novosti military commentator Ilya Kramnik)
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  5. #5
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    An Important Varyag Update
    December 17, 2009: For seven years now, China has been tinkering with a half finished Russian aircraft carrier. Obviously, progress has been slow. But there has been steady progress. The latest development is the construction of a radar mast on the carrier. Officially, the Chinese say nothing. But the dockyard workers keep at it.

    Earlier this year, China moved its aircraft carrier, the Shi Lang, into dry dock, apparently to install engines and other heavy equipment. A year ago, this ex-Russian aircraft carrier, Varyag, was renamed the Shi Lang (after the Chinese general who took possession of Taiwan in 1681, the first time China ever paid any attention to the island) and given the pennant number 83.

    The Chinese have been refurbishing the Varyag, one of the Kuznetsov class that Russia began building in the 1980s, for a long time, with no announcements of what they are up to, or what to expect. However, it appears that the ship could be ready for sea trials in less than a year. Maybe. No one is sure exactly what plans the Chinese have for the Shi Lang, although work has been going on for years. Currently, it's widely believed that the carrier will eventually be used to train the first generation of Chinese carrier aviators and sailors. Or maybe not. No one who really knows anything about the plans for the Shi Lang, is speaking up. All is observation (from a distance, but good pix are numerous) and speculation.

    The Varyag has been in a Chinese shipyard at Dailan since 2002. While the ship is under guard, it can be seen from a nearby highway. From that vantage point, local military and naval buffs have noted the work being done on the ship. Few visible signs of this work are visible; like a new paint job (in the gray shade used by the Chinese navy) and ongoing work on the superstructure (particularly the tall island on the flight deck.) Many workers can be seen on the ship, and material is seen going into (new stuff) and out of (old stuff) the ship. Shipyard workers report ever tighter security on the carriers, and stern instructions to workers to not report details of what is happening on the carriers.

    Originally the Kuznetsovs were to be 90,000 ton, nuclear powered ships, similar to American carriers (complete with steam catapults). Instead, because of the high cost, and the complexity of modern (American style) carriers, the Russians were forced to scale back their plans, and ended up with the 65,000 ton (full load ) ships that lacked steam catapults, and used a ski jump type flight deck instead. Nuclear power was dropped, but the Kuznetsov class was still a formidable design. The thousand foot long carrier normally carries a dozen navalized Su-27s (called Su-33s), 14 Ka-27PL anti-submarine helicopters, two electronic warfare helicopters and two search and rescue helicopters. But the ship can carry up to 36 Su-33s and sixteen helicopters. The ship carries 2,500 tons of aviation fuel, allowing it to generate 500-1,000 aircraft and helicopter sorties. Crew size is 2,500 (or 3,000 with a full aircraft load.) Only two ships of this class exist; the original Kuznetsov, which is in Russian service, and the Varyag.

    The Chinese have been in touch with Russian naval construction firms, and may have purchased plans and technology for equipment installed in the Kuznetsov. Some Chinese leaders have quipped about having a carrier by 2010 (this would have to be a refurbished Varyag). Even that would be an ambitious schedule, and the Chinese have been burned before when they tried to build new military technology in a hurry.

    Late last year, China announced that its first class of carrier aviators had begun training at the Dalian Naval Academy. The naval officers will undergo a four year course of instruction to turn them into fighter pilots capable of operating off a carrier. China already has an airfield, in the shape of a carrier deck, built at an inland facility. The Russians have warned China that it may take them a decade or more to develop the knowledge and skills needed to efficiently run an aircraft carrier. The Chinese are game, and are slogging forward.
    http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htn.../20091217.aspx
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  6. #6
    Official Thread Jacker Senior Contributor gunnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    27 Jan 06
    Location
    DPRK, Demokratik People's Republik of Kalifornia
    Posts
    22,621
    This made me chuckle...

    17 déc. 2009
    Gorshkov price is settled with Russia at 2.3 billion $

    The price of aircraft carrier Gorshkov has been finally settled at 2.3 billion $ (delivery by 2012).

    Notwithstanding some bitterness, the Indian side finally agreed to pay this price after being told by the Prime Minister's Office that the high level of friendship with Russia has to be maintained and an agreement had to be worked out, preferably before Manmohan Singh left for Moscow Dec 6.

    The original agreement with the Russians signed in 2004 was for....974 million $ for the carrier's refurbishment and upgrade, Gorshkov itself being offered free of cost. The delivery was then set for...2008 (article source: hindustantimes)
    Combat Fleet Of The World: Gorshkov price is settled with Russia at 2.3 billion $
    "Only Nixon can go to China." -- Old Vulcan proverb.

  7. #7
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    U.S. Navy Discloses LCS Mine-Sub Cost Spike

    The total cost of a U.S. Navy remotely piloted submarine has grown so much that top service officials notified Congress this week that it could end up more than 85 percent above original estimates, the Navy said Dec. 18.

    Navy officials say the Remote Mine-hunting System, which includes an unmanned submarine and its AN/AQS-20 sonar, could together cost about $22.4 million per copy, a spike of 85.3 percent over the original estimate, said Navy spokesman Cmdr. Victor Chen.

    The mini-sub, the Remote Multi-Mission Vehicle, by itself could cost $12.7 million per copy, or almost 52 percent more than the original estimate.

    Navy Secretary Ray Mabus's office told Congress about the cost increase Dec. 17, Chen said, as required by a law that mandates the Pentagon notify lawmakers about such spikes. The rule, known as Nunn-McCurdy after the law that created it, means Congress must review the program in question, although very few Nunn-McCurdy breaches result in Congress or the Pentagon canceling projects.

    Officials said the increase in cost for the RMS was caused by the Navy's decision to delete the unmanned sub from the anti-submarine mission packages designed for littoral combat ships. The RMS will remain a part of the mine countermeasure mission modules. The revised goal of buying 54 such mini-subs, instead of 108, caused the unit costs to increase, Chen said.

    Engineers also discovered the RMMV had reliability problems in tests, which forced the Navy to spend more to resolve them, Chen said. He declined to say more about the reliability problems - as in, how many hours the Navy required an sub to operate, as opposed to the number it actually did - because service officials are reviewing those requirements. The sub did meet eight of nine major goals.

    The Navy initially experimented with fielding RMS gear aboard its Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, six of which were modified with a door on their starboard sides to launch and recover the mine subs. But destroyers will no longer carry them, so the Navy's review is to see what changes are needed to adapt the subs exclusively to LCS, Chen said.

    Technicians are also determining what will take the place of the RMS in the LCS anti-submarine mission modules.
    U.S. Navy Discloses LCS Mine-Sub Cost Spike - Defense News
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  8. #8
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    Construction Begins on USCG Fast Response Cutters

    Work has finally begun on the U.S. Coast Guard's latest Deepwater addition: the fast response cutter.

    Bollinger Shipyards of Lockport, La., began construction in late November on Sentinel, the first in a class of 58 cutters. The Coast Guard awarded a contract option for about $141 million to Bollinger Shipyards on Dec. 15 to begin production on three additional fast response cutters. The second cutter will be called Guardian, but the third and fourth hulls have not been named, said Laura Williams, a spokeswoman for the acquisitions directorate at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington.

    The design for the 154-foot patrol boats successfully cleared a critical design review in mid-November and the Homeland Security Department's Acquisition Review Board earlier this month.

    In September 2008, the Coast Guard awarded Bollinger an $88 million contract for the lead Sentinel. The initial patrol boat, which will be homeported in Miami, is expected to be delivered to the Coast Guard in the third quarter of fiscal 2011.

    The Sentinel-class contract is worth up to $1.5 billion if all options for 34 cutters are exercised. The 154-foot patrol boats will replace the aging 110-foot Island-class patrol boats. The longer boats allow for larger crews - 23 people versus 16 - which the Coast Guard felt were needed, said Lt. Cmdr. Herb Eggert, the sponsor's representative. The larger cutters also handle better in 8-foot seas and have centralized berthing, which reduces crew fatigue in stormy weather, he said. The cutter will be outfitted with communications and computer equipment that will allow the crew to communicate with the cutter's rigid-hull inflatable boat team beyond the horizon - another advantage over the Island class.

    The other capabilities will remain the same - the fast response cutters will have a flank speed of 28 knots and be able to perform independently for a minimum of five days at sea. The cutters will be used in drug and migrant interdiction, fisheries enforcement, search and rescue, and port security.
    http://www.defensenews.com/story.php...82&c=SEA&s=TOP
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  9. #9
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    Coast Guard orders three more Sentinel class cutters from Bollinger

    Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. announced today that it has been awarded a contract valued at over $142,000,000 to build an additional three SENTINEL Class, 154 foot patrol boats, for the U. S. Coast Guard. The initial contract for the design and construction of the lead ship in the class was awarded to Bollinger in September 2008. Under the current contract options, the Coast Guard can buy up to thirty-four patrol boats with Bollinger for a total value of over $1.6 Billion.



    The SENTINEL Class cutters will replace the 110 foot ISLAND Class that Bollinger built in the 1980's.

    Chris Bollinger, Executive Vice President of New Construction for Bollinger Shipyards said, "We are very pleased with this award and very proud to continue to build patrol boats for the Coast Guard."

    Bollinger has built every patrol boat in the U. S. Coast Guard's fleet. This award will increase the total number of Coast Guard patrol boats that the shipbuilder has built to one hundred and twenty six in the last quarter century. "This is really a tribute to our design team and our shipyard workers who have proven themselves to be the best. These new cutters will provide the Coast Guard with more capability than the Coast Guard has ever had, and they need the best to perform their missions", said Bollinger.

    The vessels are scheduled to be built at Bollinger's Lockport, Louisiana facility.

    The cutters will have a top speed over twenty-eight knots and will be able to perform seven day patrols with their crew of twenty-two. The cutter will also have a 40 knot rigid inflatable boat, RIB, that can be rapidly deployed using an innovative stern launching system that was first presented to the Coast Guard by Bollinger aboard the 87 foot MARINE PROTECTOR class cutters.
    USCG orders three more Sentinel cutters at Bollinger
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  10. #10
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    Russia Discussing Amphib Deal With 3 Nations

    MOSCOW - Russia is in talks with Western countries other than France as it seeks to purchase an advanced helicopter-carrier assault ship, the head of the Russian Navy was quoted as saying Dec. 21.

    "Yes, we are holding talks, and not just with the French, but with the Netherlands and Spain, about the acquisition of a ship of this class," said Russian Navy chief Vladimir Vysotsky, quoted by Russian news agencies.

    Russia has been in talks with France about the purchase of a Mistral-class warship aimed at helping modernize the ageing Russian navy, despite criticism of the deal from Russia's East European neighbors and Georgia.

    A Mistral-class ship, which can carry about a dozen heavy helicopters along with various types of beach-landing craft, can be used to land special forces onshore and other operations in local conflicts.

    Last month, a Mistral docked in St. Petersburg for inspection by Russian officials. Under the terms of the deal being discussed, Russia would buy one ship along with a license to produce at least four itself.

    A source close to the negotiations said earlier that Moscow was also in talks with the Damen Schelde shipyard in the Netherlands and with Spanish shipbuilder Navantia about buying amphibious assault ships.

    For Russia, which has insisted for decades on producing all of its military hardware itself, any such deal with a NATO member country would be unprecedented.

    Moscow would make a decision on the purchase by the end of the year, Nikolai Makarov, the top commander of the Russian armed forces, said in early December.
    Russia Discussing Amphib Deal With 3 Nations - Defense News
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

  11. #11
    Senior Contributor
    Join Date
    14 Mar 08
    Posts
    1,696
    At this point I just wonder why they haven't also considered the PLAN's 071 Yuzhao, even if it's a bit smaller than the Mistral.

  12. #12
    Defense Moderator
    Defense Professional
    Lei Feng Protege
    xinhui's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 06
    Posts
    7,980
    View from Russia, buying from the lowly Chinese is worst than buying from the French, in the face factor.
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

  13. #13
    Patron Sea Toby's Avatar
    Join Date
    24 Jan 06
    Posts
    225
    Recent amphibious ship news:

    Chile buys an Enforcer 8000 to replace their aging former Newport LST.

    The Netherlands buys their first JSS for around 300 million Euros.

    Sweden intends to build two new combat support ships of the L-10 type for around 60-65 million Euros each.

  14. #14
    Contributor Tin Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Jun 07
    Location
    In the `shires.
    Posts
    658
    Stan, just seen this pic of a proposed FSC component for the RN. Looks interesting.
    Credit to original pic owner.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    "Liberty is a thing beyond all price.

  15. #15
    Contributor Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Jul 06
    Posts
    651
    hey tin man - its been around for a while - it is very interesting.

    follow the link below to see more pictures of it -- Royal Navy FSC - Key Publishing Ltd Aviation Forums
    Naval Warfare Discussion is dying on WAB

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. A View from the Eye of the Storm
    By tim52 in forum International Economy
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14 Feb 06,, 04:03
  2. Challenges Ahead of the Islamic World: OIC Convention
    By Ray in forum International Economy
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07 Dec 05,, 05:55
  3. World War Three
    By Commando in forum Europe and Russia
    Replies: 225
    Last Post: 10 Nov 05,, 00:10
  4. World Navies Edited and Updated
    By rickusn in forum Naval Warfare
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 26 Mar 05,, 02:02
  5. Aiding and Abetting the Enemy: the Media in Iraq
    By Leader in forum Europe and Russia
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22 Jan 05,, 02:53

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •