Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 18

Thread: Canada: A global energy superpower

  1. #1
    Defense Moderator
    Defense Professional
    Lei Feng Protege
    xinhui's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 06
    Posts
    7,980

    Canada: A global energy superpower

    Canada: A global energy superpower

    Canada: A global energy superpower

    Joe Oliver, Financial Post · Jan. 17, 2012 | Last Updated: Jan. 17, 2012 5:17 AM ET

    Today, the oil sands account for one-10th of 1% - that is one, one-thousandth - of total global greenhouse gas emissions. Studies have shown that life-cycle GHG emissions from the oil sands - the well-to-wheels calculation - are similar to, and in some cases lower than, several of the heavy crude oils produced elsewhere in the world, including California.

    Close to 90% of the water used in the oil sands is recycled.

    Scientists with my department are working with a consortium of oil sands companies to develop new technologies to deal with tailings. Rather than sitting in open ponds, we may soon see the day where tailings are reduced and compressed into dry, stackable blocks.

    Yes, it takes time to reclaim land that has been used for oil sands mining, but it is being done. I walked through a forest in northern Alberta last summer. You would never know it had once been part of an oil sands project.

    The key point is that all land must be reclaimed. It's the law.

    These are megaprojects, but the maximum total mineable oil sands area would impact just one-10th of 1% of Canada's boreal forest. That is about 4,800 square kilometres altogether - we're protecting nearly 10 times that much land in Alberta's Wood Buffalo National Park alone.

    These are facts that we need to communicate - to Canadians and to the world - to dispel myths that opponents are propagating. Our government will not sit back and have Canada's international reputation sullied by people who cannot or will not acknowledge the facts.

    The oil sands are just too important to Canada and the world to do otherwise - uninformed criticism and, on occasion, ideologically motivated opposition is putting the timely development of this globally strategic asset at risk.

    As a result we must also develop a regulatory system that balances efficiency with effectiveness; one that positions our economy for jobs and growth in a social and environmentally responsible manner.

    The existing regulatory regime was developed and expanded over the course of many years, and in numerous jurisdictions with little consultation among them. As a result, it is complex. There are numerous instances of duplication and overlap. We often see both federal and provincial environmental assessments for one project, and these processes can be out of sync.

    We have implemented a number of innovations to enhance the performance of the regulatory system for major projects. They are no more than first steps. We must, and will, do more.

    Clear timelines from beginning to end of the regulatory process are needed to improve the timeliness and predictability of the regulatory environment, and further support investment and planning decisions.

    The really fundamental modernization we need cannot happen without system-wide legislative changes and these have to be introduced together with greater collaboration with provincial and territorial governments.

    That process is underway. I met with my provincial and territorial counterparts for the first time last July. We reached broad agreement on the need to step up our co-operation in the essential area of regulatory improvement.

    The ultimate goal is simple: one project, one review, in a clearly defined time period.

    At meetings with my provincial and territorial counterparts, we also established a strong consensus on what I might call the big picture - the need for a collaborative approach to energy, supporting one clear objective: To do what needs to be done to ensure Canada is recognized around the world not only as an energy superpower, but as a secure, reliable, and responsible producer, supplier and consumer of energy.

    Canada is an energy superpower, and all Canadians have the right to enjoy all the benefits that status can provide - prosperity that can and will continue to fuel the dreams of generations.

    - Joe Oliver is Canada's Minister of Natural Resources. These remarks, from a speech titled Canada: A global energy superpower, were made Monday at the Hart House Alumni Committee Dinner Series in Toronto.
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

  2. #2
    Contributor mustavaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    09 Dec 09
    Location
    Northern Finland
    Posts
    317
    I really hope that the latest innovations in the use of new oil and gas reserves shall change the way world acts together with the renewable sources and nuclear power. We need to get rid of/marginalize the Middle Eastern energy sources.

  3. #3
    Contributor
    Join Date
    16 Sep 10
    Posts
    303
    Canada is very lucky to have a Minister of Natural Resources that seems to have a well balanced, long term, and success oriented perspective. Both refreshing and uplifting. Thanks Xinhui. Gotta love them Canadians!
    Don't listen to me, I'm a wack job.

  4. #4
    Contributor mustavaris's Avatar
    Join Date
    09 Dec 09
    Location
    Northern Finland
    Posts
    317
    Yeah, no one is perfect but from EU-USA p.o.v. Canada seems to be a doing the right thing.

  5. #5
    Global Moderator
    Military Professional
    Chogy's Avatar
    Join Date
    28 Apr 09
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,752
    With a low population density and massive energy reserves, Canada is poised to become a fossil fuel giant.

    Perhaps in 50 years, we'll see every Canadian receiving a subsidy check, and every house will have 3 or 4 maids from the Philippines, while the young adults drive their Jaguars to college.

  6. #6
    Officer of Engineers
    Guest
    Oh God, I hope not.

  7. #7
    Patron Nightowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    22 Mar 11
    Location
    Hilversum, the Netherlands
    Posts
    155
    With such a huge landmass there's bound to be plenty of opportunities for renewable energy sources as well. More energy to export! Think of the billions you could make exporting that to the US. The influx of clean energy could help the US reduce their carbon emmissions.
    "Football is war."

    -Rinus Michels

  8. #8
    Canadian again at last! Military Professional
    Join Date
    17 May 05
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    1,421
    The US looks to be doing it's best to force us to sell that oil to China. I would rather see it go to our best friend and ally to the South but I also don't want to see Canada screwed over by politicians with an agenda.

    I work in the resources industry and it looks like the next boom is going to be Saskatchewan. I hope to get into Saskatoon early and be one of the first in on a boom.
    Quote Originally Posted by GVChamp View Post
    College students are very, very, very dumb. But that's what you get when the government subsidizes children to sit in the middle of a corn field to drink alcohol and fuck.

  9. #9
    Defense Moderator
    Defense Professional
    Lei Feng Protege
    xinhui's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 06
    Posts
    7,980
    Quote Originally Posted by Chogy View Post
    With a low population density and massive energy reserves, Canada is poised to become a fossil fuel giant.

    Perhaps in 50 years, we'll see every Canadian receiving a subsidy check, and every house will have 3 or 4 maids from the Philippines, while the young adults drive their Jaguars to college.
    Kids, time to sign up for ROTC (run off to Canada)
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

  10. #10
    Defense Moderator
    Defense Professional
    Lei Feng Protege
    xinhui's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 06
    Posts
    7,980
    Quote Originally Posted by Repatriated Canuck View Post
    The US looks to be doing it's best to force us to sell that oil to China. I would rather see it go to our best friend and ally to the South but I also don't want to see Canada screwed over by politicians with an agenda.

    I work in the resources industry and it looks like the next boom is going to be Saskatchewan. I hope to get into Saskatoon early and be one of the first in on a boom.

    I don't normally comment on US politics but the whole Keystone pipeline project is a cluster f without leadership from Obama, Such strategic important project should have managed better, especially from the top.
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

  11. #11
    S2
    S2 is offline

    Military Professional
    Military Professional S2's Avatar
    Join Date
    11 Sep 06
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    10,446

    Repatriated Canuck Reply

    "The US looks to be doing it's best to force us to sell that oil to China..."

    You've been vocal in your disdain but there's been little substantive discussion on this issue here. That's a shame. These are some nice thoughts, wouldn't you agree-

    "...Today, the oil sands account for one-10th of 1% - that is one, one-thousandth - of total global greenhouse gas emissions. Studies have shown that life-cycle GHG emissions from the oil sands - the well-to-wheels calculation - are similar to, and in some cases lower than, several of the heavy crude oils produced elsewhere in the world, including California.

    Close to 90% of the water used in the oil sands is recycled.

    Scientists with my department are working with a consortium of oil sands companies to develop new technologies to deal with tailings. Rather than sitting in open ponds, we may soon see the day where tailings are reduced and compressed into dry, stackable blocks.

    Yes, it takes time to reclaim land that has been used for oil sands mining, but it is being done. I walked through a forest in northern Alberta last summer. You would never know it had once been part of an oil sands project.

    The key point is that all land must be reclaimed. It's the law..."


    Canada's concern for its environment in the midst of a massive energy expansion is commendable. I'm sure you'd agree those same concerns should exist in America with Nebraska's Ogailala aquifer. TransCanada has the opportunity, should it wish, to revisit and revise its proposal. Your own papers report as much-

    Obama Rejects Canada-U.S Oil Pipeline-Winnipeg Free Press Jan. 19, 2012

    "...When he called Prime Minister Stephen Harper to break the news, Obama took pains to point out that TransCanada was free to submit an amended plan -- one that would reroute the Alberta-to-Texas pipeline around an environmentally sensitive aquifer in Nebraska.

    "The president explained that the decision was not a decision on the merits of the project, and that it was without prejudice, meaning that TransCanada is free to reapply," Harper spokesman Andrew MacDougall said.

    Though Harper "expressed his profound disappointment" at the decision, MacDougall said, "he indicated to President Obama that he hoped that this project would continued given the significant contribution it would make to jobs and economic growth both in Canada and the United States of America."

    Keystone XL is more delayed than dead: The move lets the White House reclaim control of the approval process after Republican lawmakers attempted to force Obama into green-lighting the politically charged project in late December.

    TransCanada was not surprised by the announcement, and quickly confirmed plans to submit an amended proposal..."


    There's a lot at stake involving both jobs on either side of the border and also the environment inside our border. I know you won't begrudge American concerns about a extremely sensitive resource like a freshwater aquifer amidst the high plains. I don't expect this an easy answer regardless of poliitical inclinations but I do expect that a solution will be found given the magnitude of opportunity.
    "This aggression will not stand, man!" Jeff Lebowski
    "The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you're uncool." Lester Bangs

  12. #12
    Canadian again at last! Military Professional
    Join Date
    17 May 05
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    1,421
    Disdain only over time. I'm impatient and it seems to be easy to have that pipeline make a right turn to Kitimat BC and sell to China. At a time when both our countries could really use a massive project like this to delay it is frustrating. I would say you down South need it even more than we do.

    I don't begrudge America wanting to protect it's environment but the problem is no one wants this pipeline anywhere near them. Someone will always cry, protest and threaten no matter where it goes. America is rather large and the pipeline will be going through some area that are "pretty" no matter which direction it takes. If you guys want to listen to the whiners and drag it out for years at the cost of jobs and money in my country I say screw you guys. :P

    China would LOVE our oil and perhaps building that pipeline would make your politicians and citizenry get their shit together. Buy from us or we sell it elsewhere and you can keep buying Saudi crude. No loss to us it's our oil and we can do with it as we please.

    I'd like to see the pipeline built to BC now. If and when you guys decide where it's okay to have a crucial pipeline go we will build that too. This allows options for the future when some sort of dispute happens over trade between us. I know I don't understand all aspects on the political side I just see it from my point of view. A resources industry blue collar worker getting shafted by an American political decision. My view from that angle is narrow.

    I really like America so it's not a usual I hate America rant. I just like boom economies and I'm one of those that will move anywhere to get in on it. Plus it's been a rough road returning to Canada.

    Like I said; I'm sure you understand the politics better than I and I'm open to hearing about it. Not sure you'll change my mind but people have done so in this forum many times over the years.
    Last edited by Repatriated Canuck; 23 Jan 12, at 17:15.
    Quote Originally Posted by GVChamp View Post
    College students are very, very, very dumb. But that's what you get when the government subsidizes children to sit in the middle of a corn field to drink alcohol and fuck.

  13. #13
    Defense Moderator
    Defense Professional
    Lei Feng Protege
    xinhui's Avatar
    Join Date
    17 May 06
    Posts
    7,980
    would make your politicians and citizenry get their shit together.
    I admit, I am colored by own exp as a project lead and managing workflows. Such important project would need leadership and planing directly from the top with timelines and impact statements out infront. Very basic first year MBA stuff and I am not seeing that from the US government.
    “the misery of being exploited by capitalists is nothing compared to the misery of not being exploited at all” -- Joan Robinson

  14. #14
    Canadian again at last! Military Professional
    Join Date
    17 May 05
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    1,421
    According to the news today our Prime Minister is heading to China within a month over talks on our oil sands. If I can use my experience in Western Australia with the Chinese it's that they like to invest with big, big money. They would help pay for the pipeline and the port upgrades. They have already spent billions here last year alone from what I've heard on the radio.

    Looks like the US is going to miss out on having a bigger stake.

    http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/bus...137910258.html


    I especially liked the part of the article I quote below.

    The issue surfaced on the weekend in the U.S. Republican primaries when GOP presidential contender Newt Gingrich denounced a possible Canada-China energy partnership as "truly a danger" to American interests.





    So don't screw us around, let's do business and create jobs for Canada and the US. I know who I'd rather do business with anyway.
    Last edited by Repatriated Canuck; 24 Jan 12, at 02:16.
    Quote Originally Posted by GVChamp View Post
    College students are very, very, very dumb. But that's what you get when the government subsidizes children to sit in the middle of a corn field to drink alcohol and fuck.

  15. #15
    Officer of Engineers
    Guest
    I really see no advantage either way whether the US buys our oil or China does. Oil prices are determined globally. Yeah, there might be +10 or -10 dollars between Saudi and ours per barrel because of infrastructure but really, the Chinese will be paying exactly the same price as the Americans for our oil.

    Where the Americans would have an advantage is the pipeline that they WERE going to build and their transport costs were going to be way lower than the Chinese freighter costs ... but that is neither here nor there for Canadian oil wells. The Chinese and the Americans will be paying the exact same price either way.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24 Jan 11,, 10:31
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 29 Nov 08,, 01:06
  3. Will India Be Superpower Until 2020?
    By tck in forum International Politics
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 06 Apr 08,, 02:24
  4. Can't this Superpower make its own weapons??
    By MIKEMUN in forum International Economy
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 30 Apr 05,, 21:16
  5. By 2020 no clear superpower!!!!
    By Commando in forum Europe and Russia
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 01 Mar 05,, 05:37

Share this thread with friends:

Share this thread with friends:

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •